#1
Is there anyway that I can measure my strings? I dont know what strings they are, its a fender beginner setup I bought.
#2
You talking about the strings that came stock on the guitar? Or did you get a pack of strings that have no sizes listed?

If they are the stock strings on the guitar they would be .009 - .042
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#3
9-42 is sort of standard. Or you could measure them with a digital caliper.
#4
Quote by ThunderPunk
You talking about the strings that came stock on the guitar? Or did you get a pack of strings that have no sizes listed?

If they are the stock strings on the guitar they would be .009 - .042


Ah okay, thank you mate.
#5
You should be able to borrow a digital caliper from the tech at any local guitar shop for a few seconds. Just to make sure.
#7
Yes!

I haven't been play that long myself, but unless you have a Floyd Rose bridge, it's not that bad. You want to have wire cutters handy and know how to tune and intonate at the 12th fret (also very easy stuff).

I was a little gun shy myself, so I watched some videos and read up on it beforehand. Pretty easy to do, unless you want to pay a shop $20-30 to do it every time.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#8
Changing strings is easy once you get underway. As bjgrifter said - if you watch some youtube videos then it won't take long to get to grips with it. Worst comes to worst you ruin a set of strings and have to spend a little bit to buy a new set and try again. But its unlikely!
#9
Yeah I have been watching some videos, but not sure if I should change them or not since im not a very good player yet. Maybe at the time I buy a new guitar I can try change on the old one :P
Last edited by anderssen at Apr 19, 2016,
#10
That's what I saw recommended. The big thing is getting the winding on the tuning machines set right. Mine look messy, but they seem to hold tune, and I believe I'll improve over time.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#11
Don't be afraid to change your strings. I am certain it will turn out just fine for you. It's also rewarding setting up YOUR OWN guitar!
ESP Iron Cross Sig model, Fernandes RetroRocket Sunburst, Taylor 214CE, Peavey XXX Super 40, DimeBag Crybaby from Hell, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, MXR Chorus, and a Flashback Delay and Looper.
#12
Learning to change your strings is very important. Having fresh strings will also help your tone and life of your instrument.


https://www.google.co.jp/search?q=guitar+tuner+peg+electric+drill&client=safari&hl=en-jp&prmd=ivsn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjrqMD7pKHMAhWHVZQKHYPSACYQ_AUIBygB#imgrc=nohZho3TZZMuTM%3A

I definitely recommend getting a string winder that attaches to an electric drill, cutting strings 3 inches past the pegs, insert string only slightly (like 1/4 inch at most) through peg, then wind with the electric winder. It will eliminate any slack at the peg and make the whole process easier. Otherwise, you will have to learn the ol' string wrap trick which works, but overall is a slower process
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Last edited by 21GunSalute at Apr 21, 2016,