#1
Hey guys,

Playing my Gibson Traditional 2013 Les Paul, I keep hearing this ringing sound, both unplugged and plugged in. I went to a luthier to have it checked and set up (truss rod, action, new strings). They stated they didn't hear anything. But I do...and it's bugging me.

Maybe it's a natural sound and I'm not used to hearing it because I've never had a guitar as resonant as this one.

Could you guys watch this video of me demonstrating the sound, and let me know if it's something to worry about or not? EDIT: Use headphones or crank the sound, or you won't hear it well.

https://youtu.be/xUA074Dmg0s
Last edited by Always-Ben at Apr 19, 2016,
#2
try putting something to mute the string behind the nut
ir it could just be the strings coming out of tune as the guitar continues to sustain

does the "ringing" sound come out of the amp too when plugged in?

my hearing aint so good anymore so i couldnt really hear it
#3
I don't hear anything different. I own a number of Les Paul's and I don't hear anything unusual, certainly nothing like a "ringing sound".
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#4
Quote by Rickholly74
I don't hear anything different. I own a number of Les Paul's and I don't hear anything unusual, certainly nothing like a "ringing sound".


By ringing sound, I meant the "won wom wom" high pitched sound that you can hear during and after the initial normal notes sound out. That's normal?
#5
Quote by Always-Ben
By ringing sound, I meant the "won wom wom" high pitched sound that you can hear during and after the initial normal notes sound out. That's normal?


That just sounds like the strings sustaining out. It's actually pretty normal, honestly.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#6
Quote by aerosmithfan95
That just sounds like the strings sustaining out. It's actually pretty normal, honestly.



I see. Aww man, it's like I can't unhear it now. It's so annoying, the noise is heard whenever I hit those open chords.
#7
Part of that is the beat frequencies since guitars aren't perfect pitched instruments (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(acoustics) cause I'm laxy)

You might be able to get rid of the noticability to you by very, very slightly retuning your guitar (that'll change the difference in frequency to something slight different and hopefully make it a pitch that's more friendly to your ears)

Also, note that anything less than 20hz difference should be unnoticeable to the human ear, so you might want to check your intonation a bit. By which I mean you should check your intonation anyway because it's always good to do.

I said noticeable a lot this post. Good luck! Hope this helped!
Last edited by tfizzle20 at Apr 21, 2016,
#8
Quote by tfizzle20
Part of that is the beat frequencies since guitars aren't perfect pitched instruments (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(acoustics) cause I'm laxy)

You might be able to get rid of the noticability to you by very, very slightly retuning your guitar (that'll change the difference in frequency to something slight different and hopefully make it a pitch that's more friendly to your ears)

Also, note that anything less than 20hz difference should be unnoticeable to the human ear, so you might want to check your intonation a bit. By which I mean you should check your intonation anyway because it's always good to do.

I said noticeable a lot this post. Good luck! Hope this helped!


I ended up getting a whole other setup by the best luthier in town. Everything is gravy and the guitar has never felt better...except this ringing sound from the B and high e (and sometimes the open low E), which I guess as said above, must be a natural part of the unplugged sound that my keen ears pick up. I guess I'll just have learn how to tune it out. -_-
#9
It's hard to tell from the video, but in the past I've had trouble with pickups vibrating or 'resonating', especially inside Gibson-type guitars. Sometimes a bit of foam underneath a pickup helps to dampen the sound. Usually it's caused by a particular note (perhaps something to do with resonant frequencies?)
#10
You really should learn how to do your own setups rather than throwing money away on what is most a 30 minute job of adjusting some screws and allen bolts.

This way you could identify and fix the problem yourself rather than wasting money on these "luthiers" (do they actually build guitars from scratch or just do setups and repairs? If they just do the latter then they are just a guitar tech using false advertisement)
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