#1
Hi everybody,

I've bought a 40-50$ acoustic guitar and it's doing fine but now after a year without touching it, the guitar is unplayable because of the action is so high and there is no truss rod to adjust.

So, is there any way to straighten it?

I heard that weather can deform a guitar but can we counter that?
#2
dont have the weather do this for you. moisture will NOT lead to the result you would like to have...it will rather become twisted in a way...

and a Nylon string guitar without truss rod is not supposed to be bent at the neck.

if you have steel strings on this poor Thing, there is no wonder that the Instrument is not playable any more...
#3
So I need to buy a new guitar? if so how do I know which acoustic guitar that sound great.
I use to play 70$ Yamaha guitar and some expensive Moris guitar and I can't tell the different.
#6
name, price and other shit is totally unimportant. important is the shape of the instrument/quality of being produced.
i own myself an 80€ epiphone AJ100 and feel perfectly happy with it.
i even think about putting a PU in it not to have to buy another one...until i can afford the one i fell in love with, i.e.

you must grab it and instantly feel being "home".

i hope i could make the point not using my mother tongue, though..
Last edited by schalk70 at Apr 19, 2016,
#7
Yamaha f335 is pretty nice on a budget. you can try filing down the saddle, but that probably won't be nearly enough to make it comfortable again.
#8
Unfortunately without anything to hold it in place (like a truss rod) I'm fairly sure the wood will quickly return back to its warped shape once you add the strings and tension back.
#9
fwiw, the truss rod isn't the "action rod". the truss rod is the "relief rod".

options:
-have it looked at and worked on if needed.
-the work will probably cost more then two of those guitars.
-buy a better guitar and spend more this time.
-try to fix it yourself.

how do you know that it doesn't have a truss rod btw? i have a $29 Rogue wall-hanger with a truss rod.
Last edited by ad_works at Apr 19, 2016,
#11
You would need a neck reset, which os considerable more expensive than your guitar is worth. They are done all the time on prewar Martins and Gibsons but they are worth thousands of dollars
#12
^^^^^The neck angle could well be bad, but it is possible that the problem is solely due to the neck having too much relief. It would need an experienced eye to tell.

If the neck has no truss rod, resetting it can be done as a DIY hack job. Here's one I did:



A fun project, if you like such things.
#13
Quote by sosxradar
So I need to buy a new guitar? if so how do I know which acoustic guitar that sound great.
I use to play 70$ Yamaha guitar and some expensive Moris guitar and I can't tell the different.


Yes, buy a new guitar. If the one you have only cost $50 and you've had it a year you've had your money's worth. It's now skip material.

You can buy a reasonably decent guitar these days for <$150.
#15
Well, here's a"Rogue" dreadnought at Musician's Friend: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/rogue-ra-090-dreadnought-acoustic-guitar

60 bucks, free shipping, and most likely no sales tax (I think they only charge sales tax in one or two states).

Now, doesn't that make you NOT want to screw around with the junk you have now?



You even get a choice of colors, natural, black, or sunburst, (shown).

EDIT: IDK if this has an adjustable truss rod. As Guitar Center and Musician's Friend are the same company, you can always check it out at GC, assuming there's one somewhere near you.

FWIW, these Epiphone DR-100's always get great reviews at this price point: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/epiphone-dr-100-acoustic-guitar If you wait for the Memorial day sale, you could most likely get it with 10% off. Again, free shipping, no sales tax.

Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 23, 2016,
#17
Quote by Tony Done
You're absolutely right, there's no logical reason for trying to fix it, but for me it is about disposability - see my attitude to neck joints.

With my interests, I would likely convert it to lap steel.
But you have working instruments, and so you have the latitude to make a hobby project out of something like this, just for the heck of it.

With that said, there have been times in my life when I didn't have a the cash or credit fer a hunnerd dollur geetar.

So I guess being "cash-di-capped", would sort of trump pragmatism at times like those...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 23, 2016,
#18
Can I fix it myself? I have 2 electric and I don't feel to need to get new guitar just to play some open chord.

It's bent around fret 12 and when I try to play something like Stairway to heaven, it's impossible to do a barre chord because the action is high and the string is 13 gauge.

If I take a photo of it, you guy might say that the action is average but it cause the string tension to somewhat really tight to bend to press down a note.
#20
Quote by sosxradar
Can I fix it myself? I have 2 electric and I don't feel to need to get new guitar just to play some open chord.

It's bent around fret 12 and when I try to play something like Stairway to heaven, it's impossible to do a barre chord because the action is high and the string is 13 gauge.

If I take a photo of it, you guy might say that the action is average but it cause the string tension to somewhat really tight to bend to press down a note.
Well, I'd say putting some .011's on it would be a start. Most of us here don't use .013's either.

As for whether or not you should lower the saddle, you should. But that's predicated on whether or the the guitar still has enough of the correct neck angle and/or saddle showing to make an improvement.

But for the purposes of determining that, see Mr. Becker's guide to setup here: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

Just one person's opinion, but the lead to "StH" has to sound like poop on a geriatric acoustic anyway. I hope you're not attempting it in public...

Then too, you need a 12 string to pull parts of it off. Which is why Jimmy Page opted for the Gibson double neck to play it live.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 23, 2016,
#21
Are you sure it doesn't have a truss rod? The adjustment is often located inside, in the neck block.

Lowering the saddle should help, but the amount of good it does will depend on the extent of the problems with neck relief and angle.

CC was kind enough not to suggest that my views on repairs and mods are a bit ivory tower. To successfully do that kind of thing needs time, experience and tools, and they all cost, one way or another. Unless you have a real interest in that kind of thing, you're better off not investing either time or money in it.

Some pics would be informative.

OK, here's an easy test for neck angle and relief:

Press the 6th string down at the 1st and body fret, and look at the gap between the string and the crown of the 5th fret. It should be about the thickness of a business card or a bit bit less, Now press down on the 9th and highest fret. There should be very little gap under the body fret, again, no more than the thickness of a business card.
Last edited by Tony Done at Apr 23, 2016,