#1
What's a ghost note? On some tabs I've seen a "whited out" number, I've been assuming that's a ghost note. Cant find anything explaining how to play it, any help would be great...thanks.
Flying in a blue dream
#2
Guess I should have searched first big dummy.

Just to be sure. Ghost note is pretty much an optional note? and the symbol for it is (8)?

Still haven't found anything on those whited out numbers though
Flying in a blue dream
Last edited by SanDune65 at Apr 20, 2016,
#3
A note which is muted with the fret hand. Not optional, they're usually important for rhythm, depending on the context.
#5
Everyone is wrong a ghost is the wrong note played, in a scale, but you can play it, but don't linger.. sometimes it sounds cool.. All lead does it, sooner or later.
#6
Quote by mycus
Everyone is wrong a ghost is the wrong note played, in a scale, but you can play it, but don't linger.. sometimes it sounds cool.. All lead does it, sooner or later.



That's called an accidental being used as a passing tone.
#7
Quote by derek8520
That's called an accidental being used as a passing tone.

Yup. You already had the correct definition of ghost notes in the first answers.
#8
Quote by mycus
Everyone is wrong a ghost is the wrong note played, in a scale, but you can play it, but don't linger.. sometimes it sounds cool.. All lead does it, sooner or later.

There are no wrong notes. There are such things as non-chord tones, however, and many artists use them to good effect.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#9
Quote by NeoMvsEu
There are no wrong notes.


Except for D#. That bastard should be struck from the records and never used.
#10
Another quick question, is it useless to even try to play something that was originally played on a 12 string acoustic if I'm playing a 6 string elec? for instance, I'm not sure but I think "she talks to angels" was done with a 12 string, maybe not a 12 string but I know there is little bit of hybrid picking going on. There are a couple section with more than one open string being struck at the same time. Is there a way around that, this type of picking is way down the road for me, but I don't want to NOT at least try to play a certain song because I cant do this or that. That's pretty much how I have been learning, by trial and error.
Flying in a blue dream
#11
Quote by copperwreck at #33942763
Except for D#. That bastard should be struck from the records and never used.
Getting out of the guitar bias, tho

Quote by SanDune65 at #33946131
Another quick question, is it useless to even try to play something that was originally played on a 12 string acoustic if I'm playing a 6 string elec? for instance, I'm not sure but I think "she talks to angels" was done with a 12 string, maybe not a 12 string but I know there is little bit of hybrid picking going on. There are a couple section with more than one open string being struck at the same time. Is there a way around that, this type of picking is way down the road for me, but I don't want to NOT at least try to play a certain song because I cant do this or that. That's pretty much how I have been learning, by trial and error.
The pitches on a 12-er are the same as on a 6, just different octaves. Basically, the difference you'll hear is layering.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#13
Quote by copperwreck
Except for D#. That bastard should be struck from the records and never used.
You could always call it, "Eb" if that sounds better to you...

Although, D# is absolutely indispensable should you elect to play a B major chord.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 27, 2016,
#14
Quote by Captaincranky
You could always call it, "Eb" if that sounds better to you...

Although, D# is absolutely indispensable should you elect to play a B major chord.


Nah, see since we get rid of the D# you can have Bm or Bsus4 but Bmajor is no longer an option. ;-)