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#1
A couple recent threads got me thinking about this. Did yours effect your life or upbringing in any way? Do you care or even know what yours is? Is it a source of pride or just something you never think about?
#2
My family had money and status and my grandmother drank it all away. It meant I grew up with an upper middle-class attitude and no money, which was an interesting mix.
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'....even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked...."

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#3
no
know what it is, don't really care that much
don't really think about it much
#4
Quote by Herr Rararr
My family had money and status and my grandmother drank it all away. It meant I grew up with an upper middle-class attitude and no money, which was an interesting mix.


That's interesting. Status how? Like on a community level or historical, lineage thing?
#5
Quote by mastodon1919
That's interesting. Status how? Like on a community level or historical, lineage thing?


Both. Without giving too much personal information out, my family historically go directly back to Simon de Montfort, whilst in more recent times my great-great grandfather was an Oxbridge Solicitor, my great-grandfather was a Lt-Col in the British Army, was an OBE, CIE, Croix de Guerre and a few other honours, my grandfather was a British Expat, who lived all over the Empire, my mother was born in Singapore and grew up in a house with servants.

I did not.

My wife's mother was adopted and they recently did the Ancestry.com blood test and found blood relatives and such. They got obsessed with looking back, and I've never been that fussed - but then I've always known where I come from. Maybe that's why I don't care.

We have all of my great-grandfather's diaries, they're fascinating, it's a different world.

It boils down to nature/nurture, an argument that will never be settled as it's impossible to prove the influence of both, however influential they are.
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'....even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked...."

Do me a favour, pop into Songwriting & Lyrics and add a comment to one thread, any thread, but contribute.

----

www.soundcloud.com/christobaldo
#6
Did yours effect your life or upbringing in any way?
Sort of.

Do you care or even know what yours is?
I know what I know; whether or not I "care" is beside the point.

Is it a source of pride or just something you never think about?
It is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake.
#7
>Did yours effect your life or upbringing in any way?
I don't think so, no. My lower-class upbringing made me a bit out-of-place at school but I hardly think that's a problem.

>Do you care or even know what yours is?
Scottish traveller in my blood. Don't really care.

>Is it a source of pride or just something you never think about?
I see nothing to be proud about. I occasionally try and track it back further.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Apr 20, 2016,
#8
I bring it up when I've had one too many because it makes people reveal their hidden nationalist streaks and I know if to avoid them entirely.

Other than that, it's a mere curiosity about who I am but nothing else.
o()o

Quote by JamSessionFreak
yes every night of my entire life i go to bed crying because i wasnt born american
#11
Yes, I know lots about mine and it's affected my upbringing. I don't have strong positive or negative feelings about it but I find it interesting and would love to know more.
cat
#12
I'm at the opposite end of this then some of you guys. That's probably a bad thing, I don't know. My culture is hardcore for pride and the power of heritage and elders and tradition. I used to not give a shit about it, tried to reject it, then became accepting and embraced it fully. It's a huge part of who I am.

Interested to hear others take on that.
#13
Quote by mastodon1919
I'm at the opposite end of this then some of you guys. That's probably a bad thing, I don't know. My culture is hardcore for pride and the power of heritage and elders and tradition. I used to not give a shit about it, tried to reject it, then became accepting and embraced it fully. It's a huge part of who I am.

Interested to hear others take on that.


It's just that I've always seen it from an objective point of view.
What is a country? It's a piece of land where you happened to be born in. What's a culture? Various things that people living in the country 'do', irregardless of if it makes them unique or not. Is having pride in any of that any better than anyone else having pride in say, the ability to breath or get goosebumps when they're cold? Not really, as they're just things we were born into.

Embracing it can limit your view of things and it would certainly limit the view of other people towards you, hence I usually don't bother with it. But that's just how I approached it.
o()o

Quote by JamSessionFreak
yes every night of my entire life i go to bed crying because i wasnt born american
#15
Quote by EpiExplorer
It's just that I've always seen it from an objective point of view.
What is a country? It's a piece of land where you happened to be born in. What's a culture? Various things that people living in the country 'do', irregardless of if it makes them unique or not. Is having pride in any of that any better than anyone else having pride in say, the ability to breath or get goosebumps when they're cold? Not really, as they're just things we were born into.

Embracing it can limit your view of things and it would certainly limit the view of other people towards you, hence I usually don't bother with it. But that's just how I approached it.


I feel you on that. Good points.
I guess the "land" for us is more than the country we were born in. And actually the land itself is a lot more meaningful to us than the the name of the country it was given. What the land can give and the way it can shape and grow you and harm you and heal you is what is so special about it. For us anyway.

I don't think embracing it for me has been limiting but I can see how it could be. Embracing has certainly limited people's view toward me but I would've have gotten that regardless, that's a fact of life.

Thanks man
#16
Quote by EpiExplorer
It's just that I've always seen it from an objective point of view.
What is a country? It's a piece of land where you happened to be born in. What's a culture? Various things that people living in the country 'do', irregardless of if it makes them unique or not. Is having pride in any of that any better than anyone else having pride in say, the ability to breath or get goosebumps when they're cold? Not really, as they're just things we were born into.

Embracing it can limit your view of things and it would certainly limit the view of other people towards you, hence I usually don't bother with it. But that's just how I approached it.


It sounds like you're from a scientific-rationalist Western culture or summat.
#17
Quote by mastodon1919
My culture is hardcore for pride and the power of heritage and elders and tradition.


Mine is similar. I don't think it is necessarily a bad thing, but it can be bad if you don't want to embrace it but are forced to do so.
cat
#18
because of my dutch mother i have never lived in a house without a cheese slicer and an inexplicably never-exhausted supply of appelstroop
#19
I come from several generations of Southampton FC supporters

My non-Southampton FC supporting ancestors are irrelevant
That's about all I know/care about as far as such things are concerned
I have nothing important to say
#20
Quote by guitarxo
Mine is similar. I don't think it is necessarily a bad thing, but it can be bad if you don't want to embrace it but are forced to do so.

Yeah absolutely, definitely agree with that.
#21
Eh...

My mum's family was not well off; her mum worked as a fabric cutter and dressmaker. Her dad worked in a jute mill(not the slang type, an actual mill), had served with the Black Watch during WW2, and died of lung cancer at the end of the 60's, when mum just started university(first in her family to do so). Mum spoke German and French fluently, could rub along in Spanish and Italian, and could make a reasonable go at classical Greek and Latin.
Go back a bit further, and her relatives were farmers, fishermen(one harpooner, which is a little more badass), plasterers. General workies.

My dad's dad started work as a typesetter, had a career interruption with the Royal Sussex in Italy, and worked up to the grand heights of being a compositor for the Liverpool Standard. Dad's mum was a nurse, who'd had rheumatic fever as a child, and died before mum and dad married. One of his cousins was killed on Operation Chariot, one of his wife's brothers was a merchant seaman whose lifeboat didn't make it back when his ship was sunk in the North Atlantic in '40. Again, they were mostly working class.

My dad was the first in his family to go to university, too. He qualified as a GP in the Army - me and both my siblings were born in army hospitals - changed specialty to occupational medicine, after he left and worked for the HSE, fire brigade and latterly for an NHS based OH service provider. He's published between 70-80 papers, mainly in journals like Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Occupational Medicine and such.

Compared to my forebears, I'm a proper lazy bastard.
#23
I think it is important. How you're brought up is how you're going to pass on to the next generation. It is something I do think about since my wife is Chinese and her upbringing is vastly different to mine so the differences really stand out. I find it heaps interesting.
#24
my ancestors have been involved with the KKK, and i'm also related to the girls that started the salem witch trials

it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#25
- Did yours effect your life or upbringing in any way?
Yeah, my parents worked a lot so I spent a lot of time at my grandparents, who only spoke English as a second language

- Do you care or even know what yours is?
Short version - half Slovene, quarter Scottish and quarter English

- Is it a source of pride or just something you never think about?
Mild pride in both sides, a lot of proud heritage on both sides, e.g. great-great-great-grandfather was in the Royal Scots Greys at the battle of Waterloo and later the bandmaster for the regiment, as became his son.
A poem.
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I can out-bore you any day
#26
Quote by Baby Joel at #33935874
my ancestors have been involved with the KKK, and i'm also related to the girls that started the salem witch trials


"Sorry for ruining America" should be on your family crest.
Free Ali
#27
nah, not really

it was cool hearing about my grandparents since they came over from various european countries, but that's really it.
___

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#28
Sure, both my parents are immigrants and I've grown up in a largely immigrant community. It's been part of my everyday life and shaped who I am without my even noticing.

But I still consider myself American over anything else.
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#29
German and Scottish for sure, and some fkng english. Apparently the German side immigrated around great-great time or something like that

My grandma and my third brother are naturally pretty tan, and her name has a Greek origin from a google, so I think I might be some of that too, but idk
.
Last edited by Fat Lard at Apr 20, 2016,
#30
my mothers fathers lineage is from Hessian Mercenaries (like the Headless Horseman). We were hired by the British to kill American rebels.

...

my fathers fathers lineage is from an escaped slave from Charles Co. MD who ran away to Canada after his mother was raped by an overseer and his father was lashed 100 times and had his nailed to the whipping post and then cut off.

...

'merica.

but seriously, no none of my heritage has a direct effect on the way i live my life. i get what mastodon you're talking about because my sister really hangs on our native heritage and even has a degree in indigenous studies and married (and then immediately divorced) a native man and had a kid (Upper Cayuga Band). id rather be me and someone else can worry about all the heritage stuff.
#31
I'm part rhino, part wolverine on my fathers side, my mothers ancestors were mostly gorillas but liberally sprinkled in with quite a few jackasses.


More seriously I know my lineage back for several centuries and it's had no effect on my upbringing or life.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#32
I'm from Scotland and I'm aware of who my grandparents are/were
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#33
Quote by chrismendiola
"Sorry for ruining America" should be on your family crest.

yes
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#34
My mom's grandparents were polish immigrants. I've grown up eating polish food and my mom will use polish words at times. But other than that I'm completely detached from my heritage, I don't know much about it. I don't even have a clue what heritage my dad's side of the family is tbh.
#35
Quote by chrismendiola at #33935926
"Sorry for ruining America" should be on your family crest.

relevant repost:

#36
Is that Andrew Lloyd Webber god damn
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#37
One side of my family were Scotch-Irish immigrants who moved to the Carolinas in the mid-1700s and were basically poor dirt farmers around the Southeast US for generations. (I also have some very distant relatives who take great pride in their white hoods.)

The other side are from Leipzig. A great-great-grandfather stowed away on a trading vessel out of some North Sea port (not sure where exactly). He was 16 y/o and eventually ended up in Indianapolis, where my father's family is from.

I don't feel much pride in this heritage but I do see how some cultural stuff--and strong reactions against long-standing traditions--has wound its way through to my generation of my family. Both sides of my family fairly easily assimilated into mainstream American culture. And, to a great extent, that mixture of Western European cultures is kind of a "default" culture in many regions of the US.
#38
Quote by Baby Joel
my ancestors have been involved with the KKK, and i'm also related to the girls that started the salem witch trials



I think me and Joel are related
Originally posted by Joshua Garcia
I just come here to dick around.
And maybe occasionally wave my dick around.


My D is major
#39
Did yours effect your life or upbringing in any way?

I have German-Jewish from my father's side (strange story, he got it from his mother, and yet he looks like varg vikernes: blond-hair and blue-eyed), and Hispanic from my mother's side. I look my father, so no matter how far i go into metal, even into extreme black metal, i am haunted by all that he was and did to me, even down to my own skin. I'm also constantly reminded by people with liberal sensitivities that my skin color is a point of shame for nothing I've done personally but for things I had no hand in doing.

Do you care or even know what yours is?

Since I'm more traditional than all of you, yes.

Is it a source of pride or just something you never think about?

I have nothing to be ashamed of. I am not guilty of anything but what I myself have done. I am not my father and I am not cunt grishnakh! I am proud without hatred.
#40
I've got interesting British ancestry, but it's not exactly something you brag about in south africa. I didn't choose it, though, so I hardly see a reason to be proud of it.
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