#1
Hi, been playing for close to five years, mainly in indie bands and have played a fair amount of blues too.
I recently got more into jazz guitar, (just basic 7th variations on chord grips etc.) and was drawn to the SRVs more jazz based instrumental pieces:

Lenny - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEuKbE4MXPE
Riviera Paradise - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x70G-NhyUPI

Just posting to see what peoples recommendations are for scales/chords/songs to learn that lean on the more jazz-blues side of things so hopefully I can start making my own material in a similar vein.

Thanks in advance
#2
First of all kudos, on extending your musical horizons. You might look into Robben Ford, and even a Jazz legend like Kenny Burrell.

But as for scales, and chords, in and of themselves. That's not really how you'd go about it. I don't think scales, chords and the like get you there - songs, yes...but a lot of songs.

If you have insight, that's far better. With insight you can get an entire education in a single song.

I think when you understand where something comes from, then the scales, chords and such sort of make "sense" and when something makes "sense", then you can make it a part of your own writing.

That's one way, and probably the best way.

The other is understand the idioms of the style by learning enough examples of the style. Jazz itself....what makes Jazz and Blues combined is fairly subjective. But learning what the chord grips and changes are actually doing functionally, is of great value. So for example the chromatic 6th chord walk up...what's it doing? Its a trajectory towards the Dominant.

The best way is by understanding it, not just imitating it. Because imitation will only breed imitative iterations. But if you understand it, you can use the tool itself, with nuance, and not just graft in the same moves, to where it doesn't sound like you, it sounds like them.

Best,

Sean
#3
Yes keep up your 7th chords and such. Those tunes are good examples of effective use of richer harmonies. These kinds of chords are all over the place in jazzy pop and blues music, which you'll start to hear as you gain experience.

As you learn these tunes, you'll also run into extended harmonies like 9ths, 11ths, and 13ts. These are often melodic embellishments that act almost as suspensions, but they are also good standalone chords.

To gain proficiency, I'd recommend practicing your 7th chord inversions, both as tightly voiced (4 adjacent strings) and open voiced (like Fmaj7 1x223x). Being able to play maj7, min7, and dominant 7 chords up and down the neck will do wonders for your rhythm playing and add a lot of harmonic interest.
#4
Get Kind of Blue - from Miles Davis - that album has a few excellent jazz blues tunes - that will really open up your playing.

Check out any blues tune from Grant Green as well.
#5
+1 on Robben Ford. He played with Miles Davis for a while along with nearly everyone else. His music is grounded in the blues with a lot of tasty jazz voicings. He also has a ton of lessons on YouTube that explain his approach pretty well.

Also Larry Carlton. Some of the most epic jazz/blues stuff came from this guy. One of the go to session players in LA and lead guitar on a bunch of Steely Dan hits.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
+1 on Robben Ford. He played with Miles Davis for a while along with nearly everyone else. His music is grounded in the blues with a lot of tasty jazz voicings. He also has a ton of lessons on YouTube that explain his approach pretty well.

Also Larry Carlton. Some of the most epic jazz/blues stuff came from this guy. One of the go to session players in LA and lead guitar on a bunch of Steely Dan hits.



My favortie Robben Ford album is Live at Yoshi's - he plays acoustic on it with an insane band - great performances in there for sure!
#7
Yes Robben Ford is your best bet. Check out the song Help The Poor from the album Talk to your daughter.

Do you transcribe much?

I should add, the solo in that song is exemplary of note placement, choice and phrasing.
Last edited by mdc at Apr 25, 2016,