#1
ok i turned my amp on and the turned if off its been about 30 mins so it should be discharged correct? well instead of taking it apart and testing it could i simply rap electric tape around the screw driver im using to fix my tube sockets and not get shocked?
#2
If you need to ask this question, then you really shouldn't be thinking about poking around inside an amp.

No. The capacitors inside the amp will still hold a lot of charge, even after the amp has been turned off for a while. That's what they're designed to do.

The proper way to discharge large capacitors is to bridge the positive and negative traces going to and coming from the capacitor with a big resistor that'll soak up the charge. Ensuring that you are well insulated from the resistor and the wires going to and coming from it as you're doing that.
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#4
If you turn the standby on while the power is off it may help to discharge some of the caps, but I would never trust this myself. Some amps have drain resistors on the caps but even still, that's not really good to trust. Go over to youtube and check out some videos on draining caps, might help you a bit more than a text explanation. At the same time you should also check out videos of what happens when a capacitor gets arced with a screw driver, it's pretty frightening.


What's wrong with your tube sockets?
..I was watching my death.
#5
they simply need bent...what doesn't conduct eletricity i use something like that to move them, basically the other tubes i had in there moved them and the new tubes i have dont fit in there, there to lose.
#6
Get a dry toothpick (insulator so you won't die).

Push it gently into the center of each pin's contact.

Try the tube again.

Sometimes if you don't get the tube pushed in accurately you can bend the contacts inward.

If that doesn't work, try the contact cleaner.

(will that work?)
#7
ok now im getting red plating which i dont understand sense its a cold bias