#1
Ok so...

I have a Fender Mustang V2 20 watt Combo, and I was thinking of converting it into a head to make it act like a pedalboard would this work?

This would be going into a Peavy Valveking 212
#2
That might be awesome in a post apocalyptic world where functioning electronics were scarce. But perhaps buying a couple pedals would be much easier, better and more practical.
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#3
You could use the Mustang head as a head, as you will have to hook up a speaker load to it. So then you will have to bypass the Valveking's pre and power amps. So really you'll just have a Mustang with a 2x12 cabinet.

If you wanted to use the Mustang just for effects, you would have to get some sort of speaker load attached to the speaker out clips so that you could use a pre-out signal safely somehow.

But as lucky said, getting physical pedals would be "easier, better, and more practical".
#5
You'll need an 1/8-1/4 stereo-mono adapter to make this work.

Plug your guitar into the Mustang, run the adapter from the Mustang headphone jack to either the input or the effects return on the Valveking. (You'll have to set the Mustang's volume appropriately, depending on where you decide to jack in.)

It'll work fine, but will likely take a bit of tweaking.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
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#6
Quote by fly135
Pretty sure the Mustang is solid state, so no load is needed.
Is that right? I would think the OT would be stressed and possibly effect the rest of the circuit. Maybe not, just thought I would recommend the "safest" way.
#7
Quote by Will Lane
Is that right? I would think the OT would be stressed and possibly effect the rest of the circuit. Maybe not, just thought I would recommend the "safest" way.


Solid State - No OT.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#9
Quote by Will Lane
I am showing my inexperience, then.


No worries, at least you don't get defensive about it.

Also, just for future reference, there are SS amps that have OT's, but they are generally found in commercial sound systems that need to drive multiple speakers across long cable runs. Read more about it here. http://www.bogen.com/support/pdfs/installs.pdf


As an amp example: http://www.toa.jp/products/amplifiers/900series/a-906mk2.html
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#10
Won't the preamp from the Mustang overload the preamp of the VK?
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#11
Quote by LaidBack
Won't the preamp from the Mustang overload the preamp of the VK?


It could, but the signal coming from the headphone jack should be able to be turned down enough to avoid it. Start with the Mustang volume turned all the way down and increase to taste. I've used a similar process to create an ad hoc PA system using a tube amp (Crate Blue Voodoo) and an iPod when my outdoor stereo amp failed during a party.

But as noted he can also use the VK as the power end only if desired by injecting the signal at the FX return.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#12
Quote by Will Lane
Is that right? I would think the OT would be stressed and possibly effect the rest of the circuit. Maybe not, just thought I would recommend the "safest" way.
The reason for output xformers is because tubes run at a very high voltage/low current. The OT converts the high voltage/low current to low voltage/high current because that's what the speakers needs. Not to mention how dangerous it would be to have 300V on the output. Solid state amps already are low voltage/high current, so no xformer is needed.

The reason why you need a load on an OT is because without a load the voltage levels can build up inside the amp and start arcing, thus burning up something including the OT and other circuit components.