#1
I bought a universal AC DC battery eliminator and it doesn't work with my Boss-DS1 distortion pedal, this is what happens; everything is working fine (except for the distortion pedal) and as soon as I plug the power supply in the jack, it cancels everything out, no noise, no sound. I have spent all day looking for answers but nothing comes up, everything seems to be in order though:

-My pedal is 9V so I put the volts to 9V (you can change it around, from 3V to 12V)
-My pedal has a negative polarity, so I put the adapter's polarity to positive
-My pedal is DC, but my adapter is supposed to be AC and DC
-My adapter has a 110V-220V switch, I set it on 110V as it should be

I tried changing the input and output cables around, both of my cables work just fine, it sounds normal when plugging the guitar directly unto the amp and it sounds normal when using the pedal as long as it still has charge and is not plugged in to the adapter.

I'm going crazy over this, I only have one pedal and it's all I'm trying to connect.

Any help???
#2
Your pedal isn't getting power. Is there a switch for AC or DC power on the adapter. You need to make sure it's putting out 9v DC and not 110V AC. If you're putting 110v AC into the boss pedal, you need to go buy a new boss pedal because you most likely just blew it up. Check and see if the pedal still works with a battery.
Do you have a model number or link to the adapter?
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#3
Quote by garentei
I bought a universal AC DC battery eliminator and it doesn't work with my Boss-DS1 distortion pedal, this is what happens; everything is working fine (except for the distortion pedal) and as soon as I plug the power supply in the jack, it cancels everything out, no noise, no sound. I have spent all day looking for answers but nothing comes up, everything seems to be in order though:

-My pedal is 9V so I put the volts to 9V (you can change it around, from 3V to 12V)
-My pedal has a negative polarity, so I put the adapter's polarity to positive
-My pedal is DC, but my adapter is supposed to be AC and DC
-My adapter has a 110V-220V switch, I set it on 110V as it should be

I tried changing the input and output cables around, both of my cables work just fine, it sounds normal when plugging the guitar directly unto the amp and it sounds normal when using the pedal as long as it still has charge and is not plugged in to the adapter.

I'm going crazy over this, I only have one pedal and it's all I'm trying to connect.

Any help???


Huh?

Also, make and model of adapter?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#4
Quote by kabadi.man
2 things:-

what current output is the power supply you are using rated to ? it will say something like 500ma or 1 amp. (Check this against what the pedal requires)

does the power supply work ok with other devices ? or do you have access to a multimeter to check it is working ?


The current draw is a non issue. The pedal will only put out the current the pedal requires. You can plug a 1300 ma adapter into a 500 ma pedal and not have an issue.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#5
Quote by ryanbwags
The current draw is a non issue. The pedal will only put out the current the pedal requires. You can plug a 1300 ma adapter into a 500 ma pedal and not have an issue.


Perhaps he's trying to ensure that it can supply enough? Current draw may indeed be a non-issue but we don't have enough information to determine that yet.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#6
Quote by Arby911
Perhaps he's trying to ensure that it can supply enough? Current draw may indeed be a non-issue but we don't have enough information to determine that yet.

True.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#7
My guess is that is a polarity issue. It should say on the pedal (and the adapter) about what polarity it is. Make sure they match, or you can fry pedals.
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#8
If I've learnt anything from using universal AC/DC adapters on valuable electronics it's that you don't.
..I was watching my death.
#9
Quote by timbit2006
If I've learnt anything from using universal AC/DC adapters on valuable electronics it's that you don't.


Agreed, but he's using it on a Boss pedal...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#11
Quote by ryanbwags
Your pedal isn't getting power. Is there a switch for AC or DC power on the adapter. You need to make sure it's putting out 9v DC and not 110V AC. If you're putting 110v AC into the boss pedal, you need to go buy a new boss pedal because you most likely just blew it up. Check and see if the pedal still works with a battery.
Do you have a model number or link to the adapter?


Couldn't find the exact model but it's like this one

http://imgur.com/dRWZRHm

The difference is that mine has a 110V - 220V switch, it has 9W power instead of 18W and 500mA instead of 1000mA, on the volts it has a symbol like this, which I looked up and it's supposed to be DC:
__
...

It has no switch.
#12
Quote by kabadi.man
2 things:-

what current output is the power supply you are using rated to ? it will say something like 500ma or 1 amp. (Check this against what the pedal requires)

does the power supply work ok with other devices ? or do you have access to a multimeter to check it is working ?


500 mA and I think it's working because a red light turns on the adapter and it starts to get temperature, the pedal also gets a little bit ''charged'' for like ten minutes when I take the supply off.
#13
Quote by Mincer
My guess is that is a polarity issue. It should say on the pedal (and the adapter) about what polarity it is. Make sure they match, or you can fry pedals.


They do match, the pedal has a sticker in the front with a (+)--(•--(-) which is supposed to mean the pedal's pin is negative, right? I set the adapter's polarity to positive.
#14
I'd bet a good amount that your polarity is backwards. The DS1 schematic I looked at has a resistor and diode that will keep it from functioning if the polarity is reversed, which seems to be what's happening in your case.

Quote by garentei
They do match, the pedal has a sticker in the front with a (+)--(•--(-) which is supposed to mean the pedal's pin is negative, right? I set the adapter's polarity to positive.


You keep saying this. If the polarity is supposed to be negative, why did you set the adapter to positive?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#15
On that power supply I am honestly confused by the labeling. I think the tip is on the top and ring is on bottom, so it seems you have it in reverse.

Boss seems to be tip negative so it should be to the right...I think. Chinese manufacturing...ugh..
#16
I honestly thought it was supposed to be positive, because, you know... opposite poles attract? I guess I'm stupid, it totally works now, I hadn't tried that before because my dad had switched the volts to 12 for some reason and clicking the poles around wasn't working... thanks guys!
#17
Quote by garentei
I honestly thought it was supposed to be positive, because, you know... opposite poles attract? I guess I'm stupid, it totally works now, I hadn't tried that before because my dad had switched the volts to 12 for some reason and clicking the poles around wasn't working... thanks guys!


Glad it works.

You got lucky, there are some pieces of gear that would have released the smoke demons if you had done that!

When in doubt, ask.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#19
Quote by diabolical
That's exactly how I fried my Sansamp tri-od. In my defence, there was no polarity label on the pedal.


If the pedal doesn't work the minute you plug it in it can be saved, but some seem to work with both correct and incorrect polarity and may just get fried over time.
I once got a DOD chorus that stopped working. The owner said he was using an universal PSU and the pedal simply decided to die without a reason. Turned out that he set the polarity worng on the PSU. IIRC at least 30% of the components got fried.
#20
I think the Boss has protection exactly for cases like that. The TRI-OD that fried in my case didn't, as soon as I plugged it in on 9V with wrong polarity in went "poof". Luckily they repaired it at Sansamp for $20-$30 with S&H, so that was a happy day to me as that pedal has been indispensable in my arsenal.
#21
Yeah, you got lucky. I've seen power supplies set to the wrong polarity take out 7 pedals at once. It was quite a display.
Dave @ Seymour Duncan