#1
I've thought about updating some parts on my Squire Bullet, and after handing my other two, the current tuners need a change. As much as I do love the Grover tuners on my other two guitars, I don't know if I can do a drop in replacement.

After some research, it seems like the following will work: http://www.guitarfetish.com/Wilkinson-Fender-Style-Nickel-Tuners-Six-for-Strats-and-Teles_p_891.html

From what I've read, I may need to use the original bushing, but otherwise, they drop right in.

Am I missing anything in my understanding or parts? I can see doing the electronics at some point too, but for now I realize the stock tuners gotta go!
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#2
May I ask, why do you want to replace your tuners? If it's because your guitar doesn't stay in tune, new tuners are really not going to fix the problem. But maybe you have some other reason?
Quote by AlanHB
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Gear

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Yamaha P115
#3
Wilkinson tuners are okay, kinda doubt they're much better than what's on your Squier though.
..I was watching my death.
#4
I'm looking for a smoother a more precise tuner. While the tune holds, I really notice it's harder when dialing it in compared to the Grover tuners. Is this just what comes with the territory on these tuners? Is there a way to lube them up?
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#5
A bit of lubrication might fix them - it has worked for me. Assuming they are a diecast sealed type, you take off the tuner button, and dribble some down the shaft with a toothpick, then remove the post bushing and do the same with the tuner post. Spin them round a few times to spread the oil. I use gun oil, but any light oil would work.
#6
Yeah, they're sealed. I checked for holes, but none to be had.
By light oil, what do you mean? I have WD40, but I'm not sure that-s what you're talking about.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#7
Hit up Wal Mart or any other multi-department store with a sporting good section and pick up Remington gun oil. A little goes a long way. While I can think of worse things to use than WD-40 (sand, brake cleaner, acrylic lacquer come to mind) the gun oil is likely the right tool for the right job.
#8
Sweet!
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#9
Quote by bjgrifter
Yeah, they're sealed. I checked for holes, but none to be had.
By light oil, what do you mean? I have WD40, but I'm not sure that-s what you're talking about.
FWIW, WD-40 has far too many solvents in it to make it a decent permanent lubricant. Gun oil would be one solution, another is "3 in 1" oil, which is a light machine oil roughly on par with gun oil. Its $2.97 a can at Home Depot. So, I guess it's whichever box store to you is closer.
#10
Quote by bjgrifter
I'm looking for a smoother a more precise tuner. While the tune holds, I really notice it's harder when dialing it in compared to the Grover tuners. Is this just what comes with the territory on these tuners? Is there a way to lube them up?

It's just what comes with the territory with them vintage style ones. lubing them is not going to help get the results you're looking for. The Grover ones just have a higher gear ratio and are much more precise when it comes to fine adjustments. All the lube in the world won't change that on the ones you have.
#11
I recently purchased a set of Grover tuners because I needed just ONE tuner for a guitar that had a tuner snap off but swapped them to another guitar. When you say bushing are you refering to the washer that is placed under the nut on top? When I purchase tuners, they typically include all the hardware needed (nuts, washers, screws). The only dilemmas I've run into are having to drill the tuner holes to a larger diameter or having to drill holes in another location on Gibson style tuners for the screw on the backside. These were fairly easy to do. In the end, I did get my one tuner peg replaced/swapped out but the Grovers that went to another guitar didn't make any substantial differences to the guitars tuning adjustments other than lightening the wallet in my back pocket. I also put on "locking tuners" and that was probably the largest disappointment as far as perfectly keeping the guitar in tune or making tiny tuning adjustments. I am very particular to keeping my guitar tuned perfectly. I use a Floyd Rose a lot so that can be a challenge.

As for oiling guitar hardware, I use "3 in 1" which is a basic household oil. I don't think there is much advantage to oiling tuners (other than rust prevention) because they don't turn a massive amount of RPM. Adding oil might just introduce a sticky surface that attracts foreign matter such as dust and dirt.

There are many factors that may cause your guitars inability to dial in to tuning in a timely fashion or keep in tune. The first thing I usually check is the tightness of the tuner nuts and screw on the peg ends. The tuners I use also have a screw or two on the back of the headstock. If that is not secured, the tuners have a tendency to wobble around. You need to loosen the strings to properly check the tightness of the tuner nuts. Any play in the tuners will cause instability in the tuning process. I'm sure that even when the tuners are tight that there is some play from the amount of tension that strings pull.

Other possibilities to look at; new or worn strings, a bridge that is moving when the strings are plucked, and loose neck bolts/screws. I was surprised how many guitars have a bolt on neck that has too much play, even straight from the factory. Tiny chunks of wood or paint under the neck mount in one instance caused the neck to "teter" back and forth even when tight.

When I tune, I tune a bit lower and turn back upward to ensure that I've removed any looseness from gears final tuning position. Anyhow, these are some things I would look at before buying replacement brand tuning machine heads.
Last edited by Markfothebeast at Apr 27, 2016,
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
FWIW, WD-40 has far too many solvents in it to make it a decent permanent lubricant. Gun oil would be one solution, another is "3 in 1" oil, which is a light machine oil roughly on par with gun oil. Its $2.97 a can at Home Depot. So, I guess it's whichever box store to you is closer.



I only use gun oil because I have a can from way, way back when I was interested in shooting. Now I would buy cheap 3-in-1, but as you imply, it isn't a big deal. Car oil would, I guess, be fine, and that is very easily obtainable on the end of your dipstick.
#13
Thanks for all the info, guys. I'm ready to change strings anyway, so this is great stuff to check while doing that.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#14
If you have Grovers in all your guitars, go for it. A lot of people are telling you to lube and clean the tuners but I don't think they know what you're going for. Seems to me your preference is to tuners with a higher gear ratio. The tuner ratio looks something like this for example, 14:1 where 14 means amount of times to turn the knob per 1 revolution of the tuning peg.
I'm not sure what ratio Squire tuners use, but I'd imagine it's a lot smaller, I don't actually know more numbers off the top of my head to tell you.
..I was watching my death.
#15
Well, it's the only guitar I bought new (LOL). The strings hadn't been replaced, and I wanted to move up to .10's anyway, so I did that. Cleaned the fretboard with some 0000 steel wool, checked under the pickguard for my own curiosity (seems nice, shielding later), tightened screws that were loose, etc.

When it came time for intonation, almost no bridge saddle adjustments were needed. So, from my best guess, I was overdue for strings. The vintage tuners might not be as precise as the Grovers, but knowing what to expect, I can live with that.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer