#1
I had a mid to late 90's Jackson Dinky Reverse about 12 years ago that played phenomenal. Unfortunately I sold it to a friend who sold it to Music Go Round (actually sold to someone as he was walking in). It's one of those guitars that you wish you would have never sold.

Fast forward a few years later, somewhere in the early to mid 2000's I accumulated many guitars that were typically sold in the $200 to $300 range. During this time frame the overall quality of mass produced guitars dropped right down the sh!tter. I remember playing a Dean that literally fell apart as I played it at GC. If I would've known back then that guitars require adjustment out of the box, specifically lower end units from GC, I would have invested more time or taken a class in guitar setup.

I purchased a 2005 Jackson Randy Rhoads model new from GC back in 2005. I'm not sure what model it is but I believe it is the RR3 (Floyd Rose, Sharkfin inlays, chrome pickguard, Duncan TB4 bridge pickup, Duncan neck pickup). I played it for a few months and was fairly disappointed with the sound, action, and the overall guitar. It played nothing like the old Dinky Reverse. I also briefly had a Jackson Kelly from the same era which was just as disappointing. To my understanding, Jackson was sold off to Fender during this time.

Just a few weeks ago (4/2016), I pulled the old Randy Rhoads out and dusted it off after being cased for a good 8 years. This was an attempt after months of reading on adjusting the guitar. The truss was requiring some tightening. I fabricated a 7mm truss rod tool since Jacksons use a very tiny, thin walled socket type wrench.

After finally setting the neck to the proper tightness days later, I found the neck to have a substantial tilt forward. There was a barely visible crevice between the neck and body that didn't seem right to me. I unbolted the neck and found shreds of wood from the holes that were drilled for the neck screws. I lightly scraped the surface to flatness and removed the debris which also included accumulated overspray from the body paint. I was careful not to change the body's surface mount angle in which the neck seats.

This tiny bit of material in between the neck and body during production threw the neck off substantially. It sat right in position where it should have been. The high E string was previously buzzing the fretboard after adjusting the truss into the proper position.

I have not adjusted the Floyd Rose tremolo. But it will most likely require intonation adjustments. This is a very annoying process with a Floyd Rose but when it is all complete I hope that it plays just like the old Dinky Reverse.

As for the bridge humbucker, I pulled out the old Duncan TB4 and replaced it with an Entwistle X2 humbucker, which sounds like an old Screamin' Demon and was worth ever penny. I use Entwistle in most of my guitars because they make some phenomenal high output humbuckers.

With that being said, I have not completed the process of setting up the guitar quite yet as I have 3 other guitars currently being adjusted. I am looking for advice on how to make this bad boy play like the older Jacksons. Please post your experiences or advice with Jackson guitars or how you had set yours up. Gracias.
#2
The Jackson MIJ pro guitars from the mid 2000's were excellent guitars were undervalued when they were produced and still go for very little money now.

I own a 2006 DK2M that I've upgraded with an OFR & and brass big block. I've done several other mods to it as well, but the guitar has never needed to have any work done to it that had to do with playability. It played awesome the day I bought it used from Ebay.
I accumulated many guitars that were typically sold in the $200 to $300 range. During this time frame the overall quality of mass produced guitars dropped right down the sh!tter.

As a generalisation, I disagree. Budget guitars have only improved in quality over time. There's never been a point in time where budget guitars generally got worse. Simply because effective mass production techniques have become a lot more efficient and accurate. The advent of cost-effective CNC machining is only 1 example of this.

After finally setting the neck to the proper tightness days later, I found the neck to have a substantial tilt forward. There was a barely visible crevice between the neck and body that didn't seem right to me. I unbolted the neck and found shreds of wood from the holes that were drilled for the neck screws. I lightly scraped the surface to flatness and removed the debris which also included accumulated overspray from the body paint. I was careful not to change the body's surface mount angle in which the neck seats.

The overspray around the edges of the pocket is there so that any moisture that happens to get between the neck and the body doesn't reach the open grain of the pocket and swell the wood up. It's there for a reason.

The material in the neck pocket might not have been done at the factory either. It could've been done by the last person who tried tightening the neck screws down and stripping the holes out. Not that cleaning the neck pocket of dust is a big deal at all though.
I have not adjusted the Floyd Rose tremolo. But it will most likely require intonation adjustments. This is a very annoying process with a Floyd Rose but when it is all complete I hope that it plays just like the old Dinky Reverse.

Perhaps the main reason the guitar sucked playability-wise and tonally was because the bridge wasn't set up correctly? Just a thought.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 27, 2016,
#3
That is sad.. I hope your old beloved guitar found a good home... and did not become a beater guitar.

I don't own any Jackson guitars, I have some Fender strats, Washburn guitars and bass, the only Floyd Rose equipped guitar I own is a Washburn Maverick BT-6 Made in Indonesia HSH, there were some issues: (which i easily fixed) straighten the angle of the trem claw screws, filled some unnecessary holes, painted chips.. and had my luthier install Jescar Stainless steel frets (didn't actually need refret, but I think it made bending strings super smooth and easy), also installed SuperVee Maglok (trem stabilizer)... Floyd Rose returns to zero always.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
#5
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
The Jackson MIJ pro guitars from the mid 2000's were excellent guitars were undervalued when they were produced and still go for very little money now.

I own a 2006 DK2M that I've upgraded with an OFR & and brass big block. I've done several other mods to it as well, but the guitar has never needed to have any work done to it that had to do with playability. It played awesome the day I bought it used from Ebay.

As a generalisation, I disagree. Budget guitars have only improved in quality over time. There's never been a point in time where budget guitars generally got worse. Simply because effective mass production techniques have become a lot more efficient and accurate. The advent of cost-effective CNC machining is only 1 example of this.

The overspray around the edges of the pocket is there so that any moisture that happens to get between the neck and the body doesn't reach the open grain of the pocket and swell the wood up. It's there for a reason.

The material in the neck pocket might not have been done at the factory either. It could've been done by the last person who tried tightening the neck screws down and stripping the holes out. Not that cleaning the neck pocket of dust is a big deal at all though.

Perhaps the main reason the guitar sucked playability-wise and tonally was because the bridge wasn't set up correctly? Just a thought.



What I mean is that there was paint in the neck pocket. There were thick chunks of paint as thin as a fingernail at the mating surface. I bought the guitar brand new so I do not think anyone tampered with the neck screws. But it definitely needs a proper adjustment.
#6
I highly suggest getting some Gorgomyte for the frets man - I bet they are green. It will make them shine like brand new again!

Putting the neck on at the correct angle coupled with a full setup and lube (put some chapstick on the knife edges of the floyd) should get her good to go!

Both of my Jacksons are mid 2000's era MIJ and are great.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#7
i have 2 15' jacksons and an 86' charvel/jackson. the two new ones are set up the same. pretty easy actually. you might want to cram some neoprene foam under the springs on your floyd. dem springs tend to get mighty noisesome. i drop the bass pick-up all the way in. never use it and it gets in my way.

on the 86' i played it since well, 86' and wore all the frets down, wore a groove into the pu bezel, managed to bend all (and broke 2) of the fine tuners, and broke a lever on the flip top nut lock and chipped the tip of the pointy headstock on some guys face (or teeth) i don't remember.

last year i re-built it. tore everything down to the screws. leveled and re-crowned all of the frets, dismantled and rebuilt the tuners, hit up whammy world for very hard to find kahler 2500 parts and scored everything except the knife edge plate. easy fix though, all you do is flip it upside down and you have another 29 years of playability. new flip-top, new fine tuners, new elevation posts -back in action. removed the plastic shim on the flip top nut to get a better break angle though. a complete set-up and it's just like it was when i bought it.
#8
picture:








I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
#9
Quote by Markfothebeast
What I mean is that there was paint in the neck pocket. There were thick chunks of paint as thin as a fingernail at the mating surface. I bought the guitar brand new so I do not think anyone tampered with the neck screws. But it definitely needs a proper adjustment.


Small cases of neglect like this are common in most outsourced guitars. Even the Koreans at the BC Rich factory fucked up and left sawdust in my truss rod pocket and painted over it, so now there's this bubbly looking texture there up close and I personally leave the cover off. Everything that matters though was perfect. This was a BC Rich ASM Pro which other than custom shop is top of the line for them so I really don't get it.

People have been doing shit like that since the the dawn of mankind though.
..I was watching my death.
#10
Quote by Markfothebeast
I'll have to checkout the tremolo stabilizer.


I've been meaning to try one of these, but keep forgetting to pick one up.

I don't have any issues with the Floyd returning to where it needs to be. I wouldn't use one for that at all. In fact, these weren't marketed for Floyds, but for Strat-type non-locking floating terms.

But what appeals to me is the potential for this thing to add *just* enough initial inertia to help prevent double stop bends from raising the tail of the Floyd. Honestly, some of this has already been handled by the big brass sustain block and a change of springs, but I'm curious about how well this thing would improve things, if at all.

I'm a bit apprehensive that this would eliminate my ability to "flutter" the Floyd, and that it would impart an on-again/off-again jitter to a subtle move. None of the reviews has covered this aspect of things...
Last edited by dspellman at Apr 28, 2016,