#1
So I just got a new Epiphone Brent Hinds Signature V. Everything about it is fantastic, I've cycled through a few Epiphone guitars and this one being brand spanking new is perhaps the best Epiphone I've played to date. However there is an issue with it already though.

When I changed the factory strings I noticed the neck humbucker was loose. I didn't think much of it since it stays in place. Then I played it unplugged and noticed the humbucker was so loose in fact that it actually rattles against the body when I play the low E or downtuned power chords. Also when I play plugged into an amp the neck is nowhere near as articulate as the bridge position. So obviously with the humbucker being loose this is causing issues when playing. How do I fix this? I see around the pickup itself is a black cover. Do I remove the 4 mounting screws and will be able to fix this? Or will I have to take off the pick guard. Here's a picture of the guitar for reference. Also if I manage to correct the issue how do I determine the correct height of the pickup in relation to the strings?

http://www.guitarworld.com/sites/default/files/public/styles/article_detail_featured__622x439_/public/featured-image/lace621.jpg?itok=PLt6WG7F
Last edited by anthonymarisc at Apr 28, 2016,
#3
Stronger springs? Or maybe they just weren't placed on correctly? The pick-up actually sits slightly slanted inside the black cover.
#4
A lot of pickups don't sit straight in their mounts, I've never been too worried by it, provided it doesn't interfere with set up, but it could indicate inappropriate mounting.

When I install pickups, I use whatever springs come to hand, provided they are strong enough and can be compressed enough. You can also use pieces of silicone rubber tubing.
#5
is the height adjustment screw going through the pick up plate? (center bottom and center top screws, slightly smaller than the screws in the 4 corners of the pup ring).

maybe it's not attached, making it too low causing muddyness and flopping around loose in there.

make sure you can lower and raise the pup to be sure. please report back.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#6
Ok so here's what I did, I looked up factory specs for Gibson pickup height and took a blank piece of paper and marked the correct heights. Then I checked it against the actual guitar and the guitar was only slightly off. So I plug in and listen to the neck/middle positions and can tell practically no difference in tone. Yet when I switch to the bridge it's automatically more punchy and articulate.

IDK maybe it's just the way these pups sounds? It's still bugs me though that the neck pickup is slightly slanted & has a teeny bit more give than the bridge. Though I adjusted it to the correct height that Gibson specified. IDK. Maybe I should have a tech look at it? Or just use the Bridge position only and deal with it? The pickup works, as evidenced by it actually sounding when being played and using the volume knob. I don't understand why the Neck position is muddier though.
Last edited by anthonymarisc at May 5, 2016,
#7
if it's secure and the screws are into the base plate such that the pup isn't just flopping around, try raising the pole pieces on the pup a bit. i'd do the bottom three or four initially and leave the top (EA) where they are, at least initially. then see what it sounds like.

only test it with the neck pick up being the only pick up selected. don't mix it with the bridge when you test it. (that may seem obvious, sorry if it is.)

post back once you've tried this.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#8
Quote by gregs1020
if it's secure and the screws are into the base plate such that the pup isn't just flopping around, try raising the pole pieces on the pup a bit. i'd do the bottom three or four initially and leave the top (EA) where they are, at least initially. then see what it sounds like.

only test it with the neck pick up being the only pick up selected. don't mix it with the bridge when you test it. (that may seem obvious, sorry if it is.)

post back once you've tried this.



There are no pole pieces on the Hammerclaws....
#9
Pretty normal for your bride pickup to sound more punchy. They are usually higher output than neck pickups.
#10
Quote by J_W
Pretty normal for your bride pickup to sound more punchy. They are usually higher output than neck pickups.


I did a little research and found that this is pretty standard on most dual humbucker guitars.

So today I messed around with the amp a little to see how the pickups responded. With the neck position I dialed back the bass and brought up the treble gave me a very clean, articulate, yet smooth sound. Withe the bridge being more punchy I had the flexibility to add some bass.

I guess on a Les Paul or SG they label the selector switch Treble/Rhythm for a reason.

The Rhythm AKA bridge position obviously sounds better playing rhythm. Yet I find myself also using it for lead work. I'll try to make more extensive use of the neck position though. The smooth sounds does lend itself pretty well for lead playing but still not as aggressive as the bridge I find.
#11
the rhythm is the neck position. lead is bridge position. that's how the selector works.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#12
Quote by AcousticMirror
the rhythm is the neck position. lead is bridge position. that's how the selector works.


But most modern metal players use the bridge for rhythm and neck for leads for the very reason that the neck tends to sound a bit too muddy and boomy for metal rhythm playing and the neck sounds a lot smoother and rounded for a nice lead tone.
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#13
Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma
But most modern metal players use the bridge for rhythm and neck for leads for the very reason that the neck tends to sound a bit too muddy and boomy for metal rhythm playing and the neck sounds a lot smoother and rounded for a nice lead tone.


There you go, I do tend to do that really. ^^^