#1
Hi,

I just found out how to use metronome and now realize that my timing was somewhat beyond worst. I've been practicing for 2 session now with metronome. And I found out now why I don't sound great when trying to play rhythm. It's because I was missing all the beat especially playing alone.

Just playing Space Oddity and it's sound terrible and I hit all the right chord and now....now I think I found the ultimate answer by myself.

I just watch one YouTube video and some random dude demonstrate himself playing guitar somewhat like a beginner but with good rhythm and another version of him playing professionally but with the lack of rhythm.
It was the demo that hit me in the right place and it look like playing on beats sound more better than playing the right chords.

Is it true that Rhythm help create a better sound.

Man if this rhythm thing is so much important than why I never get answer from anyone when I'm trying to improve my skill?

Sorry for my Grammar.
#2
Rhythm is extremely important, it can make the difference between a very bland song and a very interesting song. Good rhythm to me is even more in important in lead playing, again, for the same reason. Warren DeMartini of Ratt demonstrates all of this in Ratt's 1990 album Detonator.
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#3
Yeah, rhythm is very important, key component to sounding good if you play metal.

Getting better at rythm is hard but it becomes a habit after a while, if you ever feel like you're falling behind, I recommend doing some picking hand exercises with a metronome, play a note or a riff for 3 minutes without stopping, do this with downpicking, alt picking and gallop picking.

I used to do it 3 minutes x 3 times for each picking type, let your hands rest between each exercise, also play songs with crazy rythm patterns, etc, etc. It all helps!
#4
I just practice with metronome for almost 30 minute now!!! It's fun and then I start playing some riff and of course and some song and sing a long and it feel really great like this is the magic I just found.

I'm just going to sit hear and waste my 3 hour playing some song because it started to sound really great for now
#5
My band went from a four piece 19 years ago to a 3 piece and now a duo that uses midi tracks that we create for bass and drums (and other background instruments). Working with these solid drum tracks for many years now has improved by rhythm playing 100%. There is no speeding up or slowing down that happens with most bands. You follow or the time or you are lost. It has been a great learning experience.
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#6
Here's the short answer:
YES.

Nice jazz rant on the topic:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2XnB5G6oSc

OK, that's jazz (man), but it applies in pop and rock too. Remember that modern popular music (all of it, including jazz) started out as dance music. The prog rockers took it off somewhere else for a while, but rhythm always comes back on top. Timing, pulse, groove, beat - even in ballads, these things matter.
#7
Quote by sosxradar
I just practice with metronome for almost 30 minute now!!! It's fun and then I start playing some riff and of course and some song and sing a long and it feel really great like this is the magic I just found.

I'm just going to sit hear and waste my 3 hour playing some song because it started to sound really great for now
Great stuff!

Have you seen this metronome lesson? Gets crazy after around 5:00...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9X1fhVLVF_4
(I bet he's embarrassed now he called 160 bpm a "time signature"...)
#9
I shall set myself alongside the other posters, but even were they opposite to my opinion I would stand by it. We as humans owe our sense of rhythm but also very much our dependance to one specific condition. Being bi-pedal. And this symmetry has shaped everything we see and hear around us.

It is very difficult, counter-intuitive even, to walk out of time. And this is exactly what I use to explain this to my pupils. If you can walk your music, you can play it. So much of what we do is made from that rhythm in our daily lives. Symmetry itself comes in nearly every form and it shows that much more in music.

Nearly all music is in its core symmetrical in many, if not every way, from Schoenberg to Slayer, making the exceptions that are eventually created that much more special.

One can play every note in a piece wrong and that piece can still be beautiful, if you break its rhythm though, you will completely break the context in which it fits. That is not simply ugly, it is extremely frustrating to have to listen to.

Rhythm, closely followed by timing (western music was at one point very much pulse-driven rather than set in a specific time), are key-components of nearly all music, if not the most important entirely. Because by very nature, we are rhythmical creatures.
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#10
It makes transcribing phrases easier as well. If I find phrases difficult, sometimes I will turn to the rhythm of it first. When I can sing it is when I know it's internalised. Then pick out the first note and last note. Then fill in the gaps.

When you listen to a phrase enough times, particularly from a good improviser, you realise how much of a language music is, rhythmically more so than the notes themselves.
#12
In the real world of live playing you will play chords and rhythm guitar 90% of the time. If you don't have a strong sense of rhythm and a solid knowledge of chords and chord inversions you are limiting your ability to perform greatly if not completely.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#13
Without strong rhythm you have nothing - it's probably the only major requirement to playing professionally. If you can play in the pocket, you'll be playing somewhere.
Last edited by reverb66 at May 2, 2016,
#15
I've always considered a sense of rhythm to be of utmost importance. Having a solid sense of rhythm enables you to do so much more with your playing and compositions than just being able shred.

Remember that rhythm playing is, more often than not, 99% of an entire song!
#16
Quote by JDelikan
I've always considered a sense of rhythm to be of utmost importance. Having a solid sense of rhythm enables you to do so much more with your playing and compositions than just being able shred.

Remember that rhythm playing is, more often than not, 99% of an entire song!


To be fair, learning to shred requires a lot of rhythm training also. Especially if you're doing it right. The faster you go, the harder it gets to tell if you're off beat or not, because the notes are closer together, but it still matters, and still makes a difference, and if you can't get the timing right from all the way slow to all the way fast, and every step of the way, then when you play quickly, you're probably off beat, but just don't notice.
#18
If your rhythm / timing is "beyond worst" then yes, that should be about the only thing you work on until you've got a handle on it. Nothing is going to sound any good at all if your timing is bad.
#19
Couldn't agree more in this case. Interesting and/or good rhythms are extremely important in music. I enjoy playing bass (an instrument where you can get away with just playing roots if you're in time and have a decent sense of rhythm). To an extent, different styles/genres have different rhythms that are important in that style (you wouldn't play Country rhythms in a Dubstep setting). Of course most rhythms aren't exclusive to any one style but some are more utilized.
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#20
Anhdas Ey man just take a look this site's chart , the stuff you just talk about is being on #1 of this site
Last edited by bmtbluesky at May 23, 2016,