#1
I've been playing bass throught an eminence deltalite2 2512. It has a wonderfull bass tone and it has a neodymium magnet that makes it super light-weight. Does anyone know of a good guitar speaker that uses a neodymium magnet? The deltalite2 goes up to 4.3khz in frequency and it's my understanding that a guitar speaker needs a higher frequency rating.
#2
Weber has them. Honestly haven't tried one though myself. Weber makes nice stuff, I like their alnico speakers a lot (obviously entirely different), i also have good experience with other Weber products.
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#4
Celestion has the Century Vintage and they just released the Neo Creamback. Eminence has the Lil' Texas and Tonkerlite.
#5
Quote by geo-rage
I've been playing bass throught an eminence deltalite2 2512. It has a wonderfull bass tone and it has a neodymium magnet that makes it super light-weight. Does anyone know of a good guitar speaker that uses a neodymium magnet? The deltalite2 goes up to 4.3khz in frequency and it's my understanding that a guitar speaker needs a higher frequency rating.


The Deltalite2 2512 really isn't designed primarily for bass.

If I were picking, I'd go with the 3012HO instead, which is designed for "woofer, midbass or midrange in sealed and vented enclosures." More Xmax, larger voice coil, more power handling and larger magnet (11 oz).

The Deltalite is designed more for "mid/hi or full-range and monitor." It *can* be used for bass and can be used in sealed and vented enclosures, because it has extended low end response, but I'd actually use it for guitar without issues.

A top end of 4.3Khz is actually very close to where a lot of made-for-guitar speakers top out. The Deltalite offers better bottom end response and better power handling (250W or thereabouts) to accommodate that.

An Eminence Tonker guitar speaker tops out at 5 Khz, as does a Celestion V30 or Rocket 50. Worth noting that the highest note on most guitars (the 24th fret on the high E) is about 1300Hz (fundamental). A difference of 700Hz (4.3Khz - 5Khz) is on the order of one step (say, a C to a D) in that range and would show up as a slight difference in a particular harmonic on a particular note. In short, you're not going to hear this as a "dark" speaker or a speaker without "sparkle."

If you want to extend the range of a cabinet using one of these speakers, I'd just add an 1165N tweeter ($33-40). No crossover required, though you may want to add an L-pad to dial it down or out altogether on occasion. That'll take you from 1800 right up past 18,000 Hz. It won't give you icepick treble; it'll just reproduce guitar harmonics that exist in that area that you don't normally hear. And since it's less efficient than the speaker it's paired with, it's not going to overpower it. Uses almost no power and doesn't change your impedance (ohms) -- just appears as a slight capacitance difference to the amp.

If I were using the Deltalite specifically for guitar, I'd set an HPF filter for about 50Hz and go.
#6
Wow thats some great info to think about, thanks. The deltalite2 does have a nice high frequency response, i guess is the right term. It does just fine playing the radio or ipod through it. I have it in a vented cabinet. It's already over powered for my bass amp which is 140 watts. However, the bass amp is rated for 4ohms and the speaker is 8 ohms so the speaker is not as loud as it should be. Im interested in adding the tweeter but don't know enough yet to understand what you mean when you say it doesn't need a crossover. How would i wire the tweeter, in parallel? That would read 4 ohms on the ohm meter right? Of course you say that the amp would not be effected by this load. Maybe im going down the wrong thought path already haha. Im gonna go back and read your post a few more times dspellman.
#7
It is important to keep in mind that frequency response specs are often stated as within +/- 3dB. (This is the level of sensitivity the human ear can detect changes in volume so it's considered "flat" although there are better standards). This means that there are frequencies above and below that that that are reproduced, but at levels lower than stated (be it amplifiers or speakers). Pure notes sound like simple tones (think sinewave from a frequency generator) while musical notes have harmonic content (not sinusoidal) and the notes harmonics have magnitudes lower than the fundamentals by nature (unless heavy distortion), these frequencies can be many times the fundamental and if too much is lost or over emphasized the notes will lose their musical qualities
So I guess what I'm saying if there is another component called "roll-off" which describes the drop in levels as the frequencies increase/decrease above/below the stated range. Most grpahed response curves will plainly show this.
Moving on.....
Last edited by KenG at Apr 30, 2016,
#8
Quote by geo-rage
Wow thats some great info to think about, thanks. The deltalite2 does have a nice high frequency response, i guess is the right term. It does just fine playing the radio or ipod through it. I have it in a vented cabinet. It's already over powered for my bass amp which is 140 watts. However, the bass amp is rated for 4ohms and the speaker is 8 ohms so the speaker is not as loud as it should be. Im interested in adding the tweeter but don't know enough yet to understand what you mean when you say it doesn't need a crossover. How would i wire the tweeter, in parallel? That would read 4 ohms on the ohm meter right? Of course you say that the amp would not be effected by this load. Maybe im going down the wrong thought path already haha. Im gonna go back and read your post a few more times dspellman.


If your bass amp is rated at 140W at 4 ohms, it's likely only putting out 70-80W at 8 ohms. The deltalite will handle more power than your amp is putting out, but that's not a bad thing. It's a bit like having a bucket significantly bigger than whatever amount of liquid you need to put in it.

The 1165N tweeters (KSN-1165 at http://www.usspeaker.com) are $38.95.

A crossover is what keeps the highs out of the low frequency driver and the bass out of the tweeter. The 1165 doesn't need one. It automatically rejects anything below 1800Hz. You don't have to deal with it as an impedance; it appears as a .3 microfarad capacitor. In other words, your amp doesn't care about it. Wire it in and you're good to go. Instructions come with the tweeter. You will need a 3.5" round hole in your baffle. It front mounts. It will also handle up to 400W if you need it to.
#9
Quote by KenG

So I guess what I'm saying if there is another component called "roll-off" which describes the drop in levels as the frequencies increase/decrease above/below the stated range. Most grpahed response curves will plainly show this.


Here's a typical frequency response graph, this one for a Celestion Rocket 50:



This a typical guitar speaker response. It's dropping hard below about 110Hz, it has a noticeable midrange spike just above 2Khz, and it's dropping quickly after 4Khz. The usable range would be quoted between 110 and 4 Khz here. 5 Khz would be seriously stretching things.

What you want to understand about this is that this particular speaker isn't doing a good job of reproducing frequencies between E and A on the bottom string at all (low E is 82Hz, give or take, and A is 110Hz). This would not be a good choice if you're trying to reproduce a seven or eight-string guitar's lower notes.

Guitar speaker specs are rarely within 3 dB -- plus or minus 10 dB is a seriously wide range, but that's where they're mostly rated.
#10
Eh, 12" Deltalites are okay for bass long as they're in a ported cab and you stick with a 4-string and don't detune it much. At least that's what a cab-builder told me. My only first-hand experience with the speakers was in a closed-back 2x12" for guitar use, and it somehow managed to sound both muffled clean and ear-piercingly harsh and shrieking when distorted. Had a big and controlled low-end though (for guitar, not so much for bass).
There are a couple cabs out there that use it in combination with dedicated guitar speakers, dunno if that works any better.

Whatever speakers are right for you concerning guitar depends a lot on the music you play. If you do strictly low-gain stuff, then a cheaper Alnico (Jensen P12R or Q, or a pair or P10Rs) might do the trick for you.
If you want versatility and high-gain capabilities, the Jensen Neo and Tornado are worth a look. The latter in particular is an amazing speaker, but also pretty expensive.
Last edited by TheQuailman at May 1, 2016,
#11
Quote by TheQuailman
My only first-hand experience with the speakers was in a closed-back 2x12" for guitar use, and it somehow managed to sound both muffled clean and ear-piercingly harsh and shrieking when distorted. Had a big and controlled low-end though (for guitar, not so much for bass).


My (limited) experience with them is that they're pretty sensitive to the cabinet design and to whatever's being used to EQ them. If you use them the way you use ordinary guitar speakers (just bolting them into a random box), it's a crapshoot as to how they'll sound.
#12
It does take quite a bit of eq'ing to get the hi pitch out of the mix from string slap and various noises like hands moving over the strings. That high pitch noise is very loud in my experience. It might be the bass guitar too. The deltalite has always produced very nice, to my ears, bass tones. I built a 2.66 cubic foot tuned ported box for it out of 1/2 inch plywood. Its very light weight! Yes, it shakes around a bit ha, but it's so light that it's a breeze to carry in and out of gigs. As for the tweeter... it makes sense now that it has it's own high-pass filter.