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#1
I know this sounds like a strange question but what Jazz standards would be good for remixing. I'm planning on remixing a Jazz tune and learning the remixed version. So what standards would I be able to get away with. Preferably something that's easy to change into C Major, catchy yet smooth, and in 4/4. Also is there anywhere that has Jazz standards in midi that are simple and not over-complicated? I mean Jazz improvs are practically remixes on their own (the musicians add to the original and put their own spin on it) anyway so what's the difference?

Also I'm learning walking bass but what other basics should I learn for Jazz bass?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at May 6, 2016,
#2
Is this just a stupid idea?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#3
Quote by RonaldPoe
Is this just a stupid idea?


Not stupid at all.

Jazz is a vast field. You mean Modern? Swing? Big Band? On and on. Any particular decade in mind? Maybe it is the enormity of possibilities that makes it difficult to respond with particular songs.

Nobody knows what you have in mind better than you but here are a couple of suggestions anyway . . .

Try 'Round Midnight. It's about as classic as it gets.
Blue Skies
In a Sentimental Mood or anything else by Duke Ellington.
Anything ever recorded by Billie Holiday.
Anything written by Cole Porter.
“High fly ball into right field. She is… gone!" - Vin Scully
#4
I'd prefer something slightly old as those are easier to get away with remixing (which is part of the goal). I think remixing standards and learning the remixes would be a good way to improve vocabulary (along with a cool challenge). Also is there anywhere that has Jazz standards in midi that are simple and not over-complicated (most Jazz midis are too jazzy and complex to work with)?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#6
do you do any legwork yourself?

also suggest a song thread
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#7
I (like many people around here) forgot about that thread. Usually when I remix, I write quite a few of the parts myself (including drums, counter-melodies, and maybe even a new bassline) and put my all into it. I also practice guitar/bass quite regularly. I guess I do a lot of legwork.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#8
and yet most of your threads are asking for tabs or asking super broad questions that are easy to understand just by listening to the genre you're asking about

hell, read your OP. it just comes off as hella needy

"hey can you guys tell me a good song that would be easy to work on in a genre i clearly haven't explored also can you make it easy to transpose and also this time signature and tempo and easy but catchy thanks"

it's hard to recommend things for you to remix when you clearly don't listen to jazz yourself
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#9
Do you know what jazz is?

Do you know what remixing is?

Remixing requires taking the isolated tracks from a recording and literally mixing them with other tracks. You need some equipment to do this, and I'm not even sure where'd you get isolated tracks, especially for jazz recordings. The key is irrelevant to this process, because you'd be adjusting the recording to key want anyway, not performing it in a new key (not that that would be a challenge for a jazz player either).

Now maybe you could sample a part from a jazz song and stick it in with backing music you recorded yourself, but that's sampling, not remixing. Or you could play the head over new backing music (or hire a player to do that), but again, not remixing.

And it's a little mystifying that you're trying to remix jazz tunes, but don't know any jazz tunes. If you want to learn jazz, just listen to jazz and read charts.

I mean, it's pretty unclear what exactly you're trying to do here. Can you provide any example of "jazz remixes" you like?
Last edited by cdgraves at May 6, 2016,
#10
Quote by cdgraves
Remixing requires taking the isolated tracks from a recording and literally mixing them with other tracks. You need some equipment to do this, and I'm not even sure where'd you get isolated tracks, especially for jazz recordings. The key is irrelevant to this process, because you'd be adjusting the recording to key want anyway, not performing it in a new key (not that that would be a challenge for a jazz player either).

It depends on how crossfed the channels are during the mastering stage, sometimes you can get a single isolated track just from filtering. But in most records that's 99% impossible. "Sanctioned" remixers actually get permission and isolated tracks from the copyright holders, especially when dealing with vocal tracks. I remember I heard an album once when they rebuilt each individual notes of Charlie Parker parker solos using spectral frequency separation, then reharmed it to a string section. I don't even want to think about what they had to go through to do that, especially since they often used to record the entire band using just one ribbon mic.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at May 7, 2016,
#11
Remixing doesn't have to include sampling. In places like OCRemix (the premier video game remix site), they prefer interpolation (another trick used in remixing where one replicates parts of the original). I'm still curious if there's any good places to find midis of just the melody of Jazz standards.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#12
^ Get the sheet music and create a midi file yourself. Shouldn't be that difficult. Or just use your ears.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
Quote by RonaldPoe
Is this just a stupid idea?

Well, you could try Sunny. That comes more under a funk category nowadays, but it is a standard.

That would remix quite well. Get the melody in your head first. Melody and rhythm are everything in jazz.

I'm missing something...


Insert Guthrie video here....
Last edited by mdc at May 7, 2016,
#14
Here's a remix for you. Unbelievable. Take note of the Glenn Miller and Thelonius Monk quotes.

Plays rhythm first, loops it, then improvises...

https://youtu.be/XXpN0DhW1Js
#15
Quote by mdc
Here's a remix for you. Unbelievable. Take note of the Glenn Miller and Thelonius Monk quotes.

Plays rhythm first, loops it, then improvises...

https://youtu.be/XXpN0DhW1Js


That's not what a remix is.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#16
Quote by theogonia777
That's not what a remix is.

I always thought remixing some bluegrass and pedal steel would be interesting.
#18
Quote by RonaldPoe
I'm still curious if there's any good places to find midis of just the melody of Jazz standards.
I don't know of any, and this is not what you're asking, but you can get MP3 backing tracks of jazz standard progressions - but very useful if it really is jazz you're interested in:
http://www.ralphpatt.com/Backing.html
- no melodies, of course. The idea there is you play the melody yourself... (and then improvise). That's what "jazz" is.

I.e., the melodies are mostly old popular songs, from the 1920s-50s (the few exceptions are instrumental tunes written by jazz musicians). They become "jazz" when somebody improvises on them.
Last edited by jongtr at May 7, 2016,
#19
To be more blunt and answer your original post, yes, I'd say this is a stupid idea. I don't generally like calling ideas stupid, though, so I'll soften it to say that it's a waste of your time.

What I think I'm seeing here is intimidation and procrastination. Jazz can be daunting because being good at it requires a number of skills, and attaining those skills takes a lot of practice. In the face of that, my impression is that you're trying to get at jazz through some roundabout way that doesn't require you to address the actual difficulties, but still lets you end up with a jazzy end product.

The fact of the matter is that you aren't going to learn jazz that way. Maybe you'll learn something about recording software, but not jazz. You need to learn and play the music, period. What you're doing is like trying to teach yourself art by mounting paintings in new frames.

If your goal is to play a style of music, you just have to pick a song, listen to it, learn it, study it, and make it your own. Then pick another song, and another, until you have a repertoire. Don't let the task intimidate you: you've got the rest of your life to learn this stuff, and you'll be much better served by patience and confidence than haste and timidness.

Quote by GoldenGuitar
It depends on how crossfed the channels are during the mastering stage ... they often used to record the entire band using just one ribbon mic.


Precisely, hence the extreme impracticality of "remixing" any jazz recordings from before the modern recording era.
Last edited by cdgraves at May 8, 2016,
#20
Quote by cdgraves
To be more blunt and answer your original post, yes, I'd say this is a stupid idea. I don't generally like calling ideas stupid, though, so I'll soften it to say that it's a waste of your time.

What I think I'm seeing here is intimidation and procrastination. Jazz can be daunting because being good at it requires a number of skills, and attaining those skills takes a lot of practice. In the face of that, my impression is that you're trying to get at jazz through some roundabout way that doesn't require you to address the actual difficulties, but still lets you end up with a jazzy end product.

The fact of the matter is that you aren't going to learn jazz that way. Maybe you'll learn something about recording software, but not jazz. You need to learn and play the music, period. What you're doing is like trying to teach yourself art by mounting paintings in new frames.

If your goal is to play a style of music, you just have to pick a song, listen to it, learn it, study it, and make it your own. Then pick another song, and another, until you have a repertoire. Don't let the task intimidate you: you've got the rest of your life to learn this stuff, and you'll be much better served by patience and confidence than much than haste and timidness.


my nigga
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#23
Kristen's right, "Don't Mean a Thing" (Duke Ellington) would be an interesting choice for remixing. I just wish there were some good Jazz midi's out there (just the basic melody and maybe the chords). I think remixing a standard and learning the remix would be a great way to expand my vocabulary.

My favorite Jazz Pianist is Art Tatum (that guy could only see the path to successful improvisation on piano). I also enjoy John Coltrane (great composer and improviser) and Herbie Hancock (his electronic jazz pieces like "Rockit" are awesome). Those are just my favorites.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#24
Again, find sheet music, or just use your ears, and create your own midi files.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#25
Quote by RonaldPoe
I think remixing a standard and learning the remix would be a great way to expand my vocabulary.
Not your jazz vocabulary.
Your remix vocabulary, maybe.
#26
Why don't you do your own work? You seem to just want everyone to hand everything to you. You're not going to learn anything that way.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#27
Quote by theogonia777


honestly this sounds really forced and the piano parts are suuuuuper guitarpro tone
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#28
find your own remix to listen to then what do you want hand outs too or something
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#29
listening to jazz remixes is like watching big momma's house 2

the first one sucked pretty bad but the sequel is even shittier
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


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#30
pretty much

but people still asked for it so i delivered

it's not my fault they ordered something awful
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#31
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Again, find sheet music, or just use your ears, and create your own midi files.


I want to make sure the main melody is right and thus I can add to it. Also you guys think I want everything handed to me but you couldn't be more wrong. Whether it be original pieces or remixes, I put my all into my work and write a lot of parts. I also prefer MIDIs so I can interpolate and add to the original melody of the piece (along with keeping my parts intact). Remixing is usually done by either interpolation (remaking parts of a piece and incorporating it), sampling (directly using part of a song/piece intact), or both (sometimes).

I usually remix video game pieces but doing Jazz for a challenge (that and to learn the remixed version on guitar/bass). Remixing only has a bad rep because so many people half-ass it. Go to OCremix to see how remixing is an art in its own right.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#33
Quote by RonaldPoe


I usually remix video game pieces but doing Jazz for a challenge (that and to learn the remixed version on guitar/bass). Remixing only has a bad rep because so many people half-ass it. Go to OCremix to see how remixing is an art in its own right.


i just went and listened to a couple of this guy's tracks and they're really not good. definition of quality>quantity and clickbaiting to sell nostalgia shit.

pretty much every track is overcomplicated and matched up unnaturally, or forced into being bad dubstep/listless over-the-top orchestra pieces.
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#34
Hail, OCremix isn't a guy but a proud community that remixes video game tunes into every style imaginable (they also have high standards for entries they accept). I'm a member of their forums but I haven't gotten a remix on their site yet.

Here are just a few examples of exceptional remixes that stand on their own.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQhtR-yoObs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXKCEixDtOY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO9nCErA7iE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xsbTlrpkg4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JhJXHgpX50

See my point. I'm going to just go remix "Don't mean a Thing" the best I can. Do you guys want to hear it when it's done.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#36
Quote by RonaldPoe
Hail, OCremix isn't a guy but a proud community that remixes video game tunes into every style imaginable (they also have high standards for entries they accept). I'm a member of their forums but I haven't gotten a remix on their site yet.

See my point. I'm going to just go remix "Don't mean a Thing" the best I can. Do you guys want to hear it when it's done.


I checked these out. I do know some of these tracks back from when I used to play a lot of games in my childhood. But I dunno, you could describe them all in single a sentence as:
Over the top mediocrity with a lack of imagination.

Edit: Also, count me out in checking out your remix. In my honest opinion, it's blasphemy to 'remix' jazz. The point of jazz is to push boundaries and move forward, you're going backwards. It'd be a different story if you were making hip hop or something similar; taking short samples and creating a whole new work, disembodied from its original context. I'm usually a very nice person, but this is just sacrosanct. Sorry.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at May 12, 2016,
#37
How did any of those 5 examples show mediocrity and/or lack of imagination? All of them took their source/sources in a unique and artistic direction. It takes serious skill to do stuff like that. Try doing better if you think you can.

Second, how is remixing Jazz "moving backwards"? I see it as similar to what the greats did before us (took what came before and took it in a new direction). Besides I have a skill with electronic music and remixing. Though I understand what I'm doing (along with my style) isn't for everyone and I'm sorry if I sound rude
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#38
Quote by GoldenGuitar
I checked these out. I do know some of these tracks back from when I used to play a lot of games in my childhood. But I dunno, you could describe them all in single a sentence as:
Over the top mediocrity with a lack of imagination.

Edit: Also, count me out in checking out your remix. In my honestly opinion, it's blasphemy to 'remix' jazz. The point of jazz is to push boundaries and move forward, you're going backwards. It'd be a different story if you were making hip hop or something similar; taking short samples and creating a whole new work, disembodied from its original context. I'm usually a very nice person, but this is just sacrosanct. Sorry.


i like you
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You win. I'm done here.
#39
Quote by RonaldPoe
How did any of those 5 examples show mediocrity and/or lack of imagination?


They weren't good. Everything felt very arbitrary.

Though I understand what I'm doing (along with my style) isn't for everyone and I'm sorry if I sound rude


tbh I'm not sure it's for anyone really
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
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