#1
I have a gibson sg which is my main guitar and I play it a lot, but I also have a superstrat style guitar, which has a recessed floyd rose. Because of that, the strings are much closer to the body and I find this uncomfortable. Is there anything I can do about this? Also, is there anything I can do to make this guitar a bit brighter, and give it more attack? It feels sorta rubbery now
#2
Not really, no. Asking how to make a superstrat feel like an SG is a bit like asking how to make a motorcycle drive like a Toyota Prius. They're different styles of guitar on a fundamental level.

I suppose you could shim the neck a little to make the neck sit higher in the pocket which would force the bridge to raise in action significantly. But honestly if it plays fine now, I wouldn't mess with something that isn't broken.

If you really cannot get on with the guitar in terms of how it feels so different from your SG, then I suggest selling it.
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#3
The strings height problem is probably something I can get used to, I just don`t play this guitar a lot, but the strings feel like rubberbands, and they sound like rubberbands too, that`s my main issue with this guitar. And no, it`s not a cheap guitar, it`s a high-end ibanez clone
#4
And no, it`s not a cheap guitar, it`s a high-end ibanez clone

Where did I suggest that it was?

If the guitar hasn't been played for quite some time, then it'll almost certainly need restringing.

The thing I would try is using a heavier gauge. That'll help reduce the effect of the strings feeling like rubber bands. My guess on what's happening is because the existing strings are so light, there is little spring tension required to compensate for the string tension. So any movement of the string from plucking is going to have more influence on where the bridge is sitting at any one time than if the strings were heavier. So the bridge is going to be more prone to diving as you pluck the strings, thus creating the rubber band effect you're experiencing.

An alternative is to block the bridge altogether, which will stop the springs from functioning altogether. It'll immediately stop the rubber banding effect, but you'll end up losing all of the Floyd's functionality.
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#5
Heavy strings = more tension = higher action on the guitar. To me that's what it sounds like you want, higher action. Take it to a guitar shop and tell them you want higher action, they should be able to facilitate that.

At worst, just get a new nut, that will make the strings higher on the board.

But I would suggest getting new strings, and then just getting used to it. Having different feeling guitars is kind of the point of having different guitars... they're different
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#6
Quote by Anthony1991
Heavy strings = more tension = higher action on the guitar. To me that's what it sounds like you want, higher action. Take it to a guitar shop and tell them you want higher action, they should be able to facilitate that.

At worst, just get a new nut, that will make the strings higher on the board.

But I would suggest getting new strings, and then just getting used to it. Having different feeling guitars is kind of the point of having different guitars... they're different

String gauge doesnt have anything to do with action... You are supposed to adjust the truss rod to compensate for different gauge strings. Getting heavier strings and leaving huge relief in the neck is not a solution for anything.
#7
You didn`t suggest it`s a cheap guitar, but the rubbery feel is something I always see in cheaper products. The trem is non-floating dive-only so hitting the strings doesn`t move it at all, I will put some heavier strings and check it. Maybe stainless steel strings for added brightness?
#8
OP...
if you want to raise the height of the strings, adjust the screws that the bridge is "hooked" on.
http://www.clevelandmetalzone.com/JWGuitars/tech/floyd/setup15.jpg

No diss to other posters, but your should be able to adjust the height without changing strings or messing with the truss rod. If the picture on my link is not like your bridge, then there must be a screw someplace that can increase height. Hard to say where it is without a picture.
#9
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The trem is non-floating dive-only
Hang on. In your original post you said it was recessed. Now you're saying it's not. That's quite a different matter. You can do far more to affect the feel of a non-recessed bridge than with a recessed one which has to remain balanced.

Anyhoo, it's a tough case because the thing you're chasing isn't something which can be modded into a guitar. Getting more attack in the sound and taking out the rubberband-feel of the strings means increasing the break angle over both the bridge saddles and nut, and that can be adjusted in all guitars... except ones with double locking vibratos. (N.B.: the term for these bridges is vibrato, not tremolo. Vibrato is for pitch, tremolo is for volume.)

The more drastic the angle of the string as it comes across the nut or bridge saddles, the more of a 'snap' it has when plucked or strummed. It's not a difference in tension as you fret the string normally, but it's a difference in resistence when you bend the string, and it's a difference in tone.

Bridges with the biggest break angle are string-through hardtails, where the string comes up vertically and then almost at a right angle over the saddle, like many old Telecasters, and wraparound bridges like you get on Les Paul Juniors. Next is a standard Stratocaster bridge, then a tune-o-matic & string-through, then tune-o-matic & stopbar, followed by tune-o-matic and bigsby or similar tailpiece. A Floyd Rose bridge, or other locking vibrato bridge, has the shallowest break angle at the bridge, and can't have the angle adjusted.

Similarly, an angled headstock and tall nut gives you the most angle at the nut, and the lower the nut goes and the less tilted the headsotck is, the shallower break angle you get. In the case of locking nuts, the break angle is rendered utterly void; the string is essentially coming out totally flat, no matter the headstock design or nut height.

So you're trying to get a guitar with the flattest break angles possible to feel and sound more like a guitar with some of the most severe break angles possible; these are inherent to these guitars' designs and not something you can change with a basic set up. Your options to bring back more attack and snappier strings are very, very limited.

The first thing I'd do is go up half a string gauge. So if you currently use 0.009 strings, use 0.0095, 0.0095 should go up to 0.010, 0.010 would move up to 0.0105, etc. Going up a half gauge like that won't have too much of an effect on your general playing, but it will give you that touch more resistance, vaguely similar to increasing the nut/bridge break angle.
Switching to a different type of string could also help. DR Tite Fit and Hi Beam strings, as well as Ernie Ball RPS, Titanium RPS, and Cobalt strings, all give you a snappier feel and tone compared to other makes of the same gauge. If you switch to one of these snappier string designs and go up a half gauge, you should start to get more of both the feel an tone of a guitar with greater break angles.

Swapping the bridge saddles and locking nut for stainless steel versions, or even titanium ones, will also add a lot more brightness to your sound, though these won't affect the feel of the strings in any way.

You may also consider disconnecting any tone controls the guitar has. Removing a tone control from the pickups' signal means you get more output, especially in the higher frequencies, and this can compensate for the naturally duller tone of lower tunings, heavier strings, and shallow saddle/nut angles. Again, it won't affect the feel of the strings, but it's the same sort of change in tone that switching to titanium or cobalt strings causes.

Something you may like to try—but this is not something I would recommend for most people and should only be used as a last-ditch effort—is to attempt to increase the break angles at the nut and bridge. You can't do this with a recessed bridge, but with a non-recesed one, you could raise the posts very high and then increase the spring tension so the bridge is pulled quit far back against the body, leaving the saddles tilted backwards. This doesn't change the break angle much, but it' a start. You the need to be able to take the neck off and insert a shim to get the neck pocket angle correct for the new string height, and finally you raise and unlock the nut, and replace the regular tuners with locking ones. It helps to replace the locking nut entirely with a graphite compound nut; Earvana make one which replaces Floyd-style nuts. By doing all of this, you increase the angle of the string as it travels across the nut and the very end of the saddle, and you're raising the strings further off the body for more of a tune-o-matic feel. The downside to all of this is it limits the range of the vibrato more, it reduces tuning stability dramatically, it raises the action very high if you don't shim the neck pocket correctly, and it can have a devastating impact on the sustain of notes. It's something to consider, but not something I advise you actually do unless you've tried every other option first.
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#10
Now that`s an answer I was looking for, explains with no complains. I forgot to mention - it`s recessed but it`s dive only because of a little device I made to block it`s movement. Thanks for all the help and explanation, I think I will just get the action a bit higher and compensate with a shim and fatter strings. Thanks for help!