#1
Hey, my name is Jimmy. I recently formed a new band with me on vocals for the first time. I'm currently recording all the instruments and finding the members to jam with me. After recording three songs, I just do not like my vocals. I'm not sure if it's because they aren't good, not in key, or is just simply a self-conscience issue that I need to get over. But please listen to the song and give me your input. I know there are a few mixing problems, it's still in a rough draft stage. I just want you to focus on the vocals, It's all clean vocals. Please help me out.

https://soundcloud.com/jimmy-alexander-395124600/5-2-runaway
#2
Actually your not as bad as you made yourself out to be lol, and that's something a lot of singers do because we can be our own worse critics so it's always good to have honest, constructive criticism. You sound a lot like a few alternative/punk rock bands, Rise Against is one that comes to mind. Anyhow, What it really comes down to is what is your aim as far as singing goes? Are you trying to learn to get a decent vocal range or do you want to know enough to get you by? If your just doing enough to get you by your vocals are fine for the type of music your writing. If your looking to branch out ear-training is a great start. The best practice you can do is just play chords of every scale and octaves including using a capo sometimes, and just sing along with them and find your range without straining yourself. If you can tune by ear you'll know if your out of key or not. Once you know your range make it a part of your daily practice/routine and you'll find that your range will get a little bigger over time you'll eventually come to a limit of what you can or can't do that is everybody. I myself always practice in the key and scales I write in first and then move on to others. But don't limit yourself, just like guitar just because you write metal doesn't mean you can't learn jazz and other types of music along the way. Thing is there's is no quick easy way this is the way many people do it. I found using my acoustic or just clean helped a lot at hearing myself better and piano/keyboard did too. Even recording a series of chords and playing them back and singing to them when you can't have your instrument nearby will help. Like I said you'll get it better it just takes time. Anyhow that's the best advice I can give you if your looking to sing long term and get better. I hope it works out for you and I'd like to hear more of your songs in the future.
#3
Make sure you do not drink soda beverages (those will damage your vocal potential), eat foods that will tire you or make your body harmed, do weight lifting that will strain your shoulders so much, drink certain alcohol as that will impair your vocal control, and do drugs that make you lose proper concentration. Make sure you are sleeping appropriately enough to keep your body ready for energy to use for singing. Also, having a recorder to check or double-check your improvements can be efficient. Impulsively wanting to sing will likely be enough to get you where you are seeming to go here, too. If you consider yourself an artist, Jimmy, then understand that some artists actually don't like their projects enough because they think those projects need to be better when some people really like those projects before them being improved.