#1
Hey everyone,

I've bought a Levinson LG-222EA a couple of months ago, a great guitar.

Recently I had to change the strings and give her a good clean. I had some instructions with a Dunlop fingerboard care kit, but how many times a year do you really use the cleaning and lemon oil product? I've heard it's not a good idea to use it every time you change strings.

Also, I've got no idea what to do with the body. I just dusted it off with microfiber and then a damp cloth. Seems to look alright, but are there products to maintain it? I just give it an occasional dust-off, but that's it.

Furthermore, does anybody have any advice on tools to make it easier to put on strings? I had some real trouble getting them on correctly, and even now, one string has not wound up exactly around the mechanism at the top twist (any of you guys know if this could be a problem). I poked it trough the hole and pulled and thought it would wind up when the string would come under tension, but it didn't.

And last but not least, now that I've had my guitars for a couple of months, I start to see some scratches and things like that. I'm very careful with my guitar, but it happens anyway. Does anyone know of any products or ways to remove them? The head stock is gloss, but the body is just satin/dull finished.

If you have any advice on any of these things, please feel free to share it.
Last edited by Bedlam-X at May 5, 2016,
#2
Quote by Bedlam-X
Hey everyone,

I've bought a Levinson LG-222EA a couple of months ago, a great guitar.

Recently I had to change the strings and give her a good clean. I had some instructions with a Dunlop fingerboard care kit, but how many times a year do you really use the cleaning and lemon oil product? I've heard it's not a good idea to use it every time you change strings.


Depends on how oily your fingers are and how often you change strings.
But, to put a number on it, try once every six months

Also, I've got no idea what to do with the body. I just dusted it off with microfiber and then a damp cloth. Seems to look alright, but are there products to maintain it? I just give it an occasional dust-off, but that's it.

There are a wide variety of guitar polishes on the market. Everyone has their favorite and they all work. ( interesting side note: Martin guitar polish is mostly water.)

Furthermore, does anybody have any advice on tools to make it easier to put on strings? I had some real trouble getting them on correctly, and even now, one string has not wound up exactly around the mechanism at the top twist (any of you guys know if this could be a problem). I poked it trough the hole and pulled and thought it would wind up when the string would come under tension, but it didn't.

Most music shops sell string winders. These are usually made of plastic and really speed up the string changing process. And they really save your wrist!

And last but not least, now that I've had my guitars for a couple of months, I start to see some scratches and things like that. I'm very careful with my guitar, but it happens anyway. Does anyone know of any products or ways to remove them? The head stock is gloss, but the body is just satin/dull finished.

Guitars get scratched and dinged. Its a sign of love and use.
Note if you rub the body in a small area ( like resting a finger or two on the face when you are playing fingerstyle) that area will become shiny.

If you have any advice on any of these things, please feel free to share it.
#3
I used to rub lemon Pledge on a guitar years ago when I cleaned it (my first). It's a good thing it was a lousy guitar because I learned that was the exact wrong thing to do.

I never clean my guitars anymore. They get dusty, that's all, so I just brush the dust off with a T-shirt when it bugs me.
#4
Macguire's scratch-x or probably any guitar polish and a little bit of hand buffing with a soft lint-free cloth will get out light surface scratches, but I wouldn't do it too often for fear of wearing off the finish. Wiping the guitar down periodically with a soft micro-fibre cloth should be sufficient. Let me emphasize the word SOFT as there are some micro-fibre wiping cloths out there that aren't soft. I oil my fretboard with the Dunlop lemon when I change strings but I don't change mine very often.
#5
Quote by TobusRex
I used to rub lemon Pledge on a guitar years ago when I cleaned it (my first). It's a good thing it was a lousy guitar because I learned that was the exact wrong thing to do.

I never clean my guitars anymore. They get dusty, that's all, so I just brush the dust off with a T-shirt when it bugs me.


I actually used real lemon essential oil (100%) on the fretboard of my first guitar before I was told this was not good, not the same thing as the fretboard lemon oil which is only a little bit lemon and mostly linseed I believe. Luckily I only applied it twice and no damage occurred.
#6
That's a nice looking guitar. I've got dry, non-reactive skin, and my guitars get very little maintenance. I use fretboard oil (Dr Ducks) only on the rare occasions when I have all the strings off at once - every few years. I've used baby wet wipes and ordinary mild detergent for cleaning the body, and Shellite (lighter fuel) for oily marks, sticky tape residues etc.

I do not use abrasives of any kind on either the fretboard or the body. An ordinary soft eraser will clean the fretboard/fret crevices. I do minor finish repairs as a specific project that includes steaming, drop filling, levelling, cutting back and polishing, otherwise I leave them well enough alone. If it is a satin finish, invisible repairs are very difficult unless you want to try polishing the whole top or body. This can be done sometimes, but it carries risks.

The only tools I use for string changing are a pin puller, a small pair of side cutters and a tuner.
#7
Quote by Bedlam-X
Hey everyone,

I've bought a Levinson LG-222EA a couple of months ago, a great guitar.

Recently I had to change the strings and give her a good clean. I had some instructions with a Dunlop fingerboard care kit, but how many times a year do you really use the cleaning and lemon oil product? I've heard it's not a good idea to use it every time you change strings.

Also, I've got no idea what to do with the body. I just dusted it off with microfiber and then a damp cloth. Seems to look alright, but are there products to maintain it? I just give it an occasional dust-off, but that's it.

Furthermore, does anybody have any advice on tools to make it easier to put on strings? I had some real trouble getting them on correctly, and even now, one string has not wound up exactly around the mechanism at the top twist (any of you guys know if this could be a problem). I poked it trough the hole and pulled and thought it would wind up when the string would come under tension, but it didn't.

And last but not least, now that I've had my guitars for a couple of months, I start to see some scratches and things like that. I'm very careful with my guitar, but it happens anyway. Does anyone know of any products or ways to remove them? The head stock is gloss, but the body is just satin/dull finished.

If you have any advice on any of these things, please feel free to share it.


This is how you string a guitar:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXEkDR_-D88

And since you were just about to ask, yeah, you use a power peg winder, so you can guide the strings as you wrap them with your free hand.

It helps greatly to have another guitar standing by, so you can use it as a tuning reference. I think it's easier than a head stock tuner to rough in the pitches. After you get it near up to pitch, then you can slap on the tuner as you stretch the strings to break them in a bit.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 6, 2016,