#1
Hello! I'm new here. I wanna learn songwriting. I've seen a lot of lyrics of songs, and it seems that some doesnt really ryhme with the next line, or the rhyming is irregular. So i wanna ask, is it necessary to rhyme?? And have a rule?? Like a poem. Or is it free? No matter how many words in a line .....?
#2
Hello again...here's my response for you

rhyme is an option - it isn't essential. When used well it can be fantastic and really add to a piece, it can show the skill of the songwriter without losing the message of the song. At the same time, when used badly it can be clichéd (for example, bad/sad, love/enough, me/be, you/do) and the problem with that is it tends to take away the importance or emphasis of what you're saying .

With songwriting there are no rules- you're the creator and can do whatever you want, there are however conventions, or structures that many people follow - but they are not exclusive - you are the artist.

The best thing to do is write, write and write some more. If you're up for it, post what you've written in the forum, there will always be people who will read it and get back to you on it, providing constructive criticism (and that is often the hardest part of writing, learning how to take constructive criticism!) and you will develop and grow as a writer.

Chris
________
|
'....even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked...."

Do me a favour, pop into Songwriting & Lyrics and add a comment to one thread, any thread, but contribute.

----

www.soundcloud.com/christobaldo
#4
Quote by Aeolian Harmony
Yes, I agree with Chris--the best piece of advice if you want to be a songwriter is just to write. Write write write



Echo this.

One doesn't "learn" song-writing. It is a skill that you will develop over time. Everyone is born with a stack of blank canvases; paint on them what you will. Whether it is guitar, cooking, playing chess, your job, anything under the sun, the more you do it the better you should get at doing it.

And if I may add to what Aeolian Harmony just posted . . . Write, write, write and then re-write, re-write, re-write.

And have fun!
“High fly ball into right field. She is… gone!" - Vin Scully
#5
I also agree with what's been said. I know I've explored the same concepts repeatedly but with differing expressions and layouts. Some have positive reactions some do not. The expression of the work is the goal. The way to get there is your choice. Some writing may give a better advatage to said expression. The options are pretty open and finding your niche can be daunting.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.
#6
So you guys are basically saying, it's free. Free free free write whatever comes out of your head? No rules whatsoever? Haha. Aight thanks for the replies! i'll start to write write write
#7
Pretty much!

A lot of the conventions and structures can be useful in learning the skill, certainly of narrative. When I started writing songs (a long time ago ) I went with very traditional structures (3 verses, choruses and a bridge) and was very much influenced by rhyming. Now it depends on what I'm writing - and I feel a bit more confident to explore and experiment.

Write what you like and see how you get along - honestly, most of what I write is for the joy of writing - if people like it that's a bonus. Happy writing!
|
'....even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked...."

Do me a favour, pop into Songwriting & Lyrics and add a comment to one thread, any thread, but contribute.

----

www.soundcloud.com/christobaldo
#8
There are no "rules" but you will want a good hook. There are lots of ways you can rhyme or not rhyme.

There is a coursera course on songwriting you can take. He has some interesting ideas he can teach you about songwriting, and quite a lot of rhyme scheme analysis also.

You can always do whatever you want. If you cook you can always use whatever ingredients you want. But chocilate tastes like chocolate, garlic tastes like garlic. There are no rules, but you likely won't want to mix chocolate and garlic together because of what the experience is like.

Rhyming is that way also. When you semi rhyme, or don't rhyme, or rhyme every second line, or rhyme the beginning orlf words and not the ends, it sounds like what it sounds like. Write with the intent of creating the experience you want. Not by following some, method rules, or system, or whatever.

It's all up to you. But common things occur, because of the way things are. Rhyming occurs often because it sounds like how rhyming sounds. You might not want that, or maybe you do. It's up to you.

Writing a lot is not a bad thing, but at the same time, repeating the same mistakes over and over, won't necessarily improve your songwriting either. Repetition doesn't necessarily improve. You need to observe, analyze troubleshoot, problem solve and all that. I could draw a thousand stickmen, and that won't bring me any closer to painting like Michaelangelo.
#9
By far the be book out there is The Craft of Lyric Writing by Sheila Davis. You can get it cheap at ABE books online.