#1
I write more acoustic/indie/folk style and have wanted a new guitar for awhile... something different. Would a resonator be a good choice? I switch off between both fingerpicking and strumming.

Please give other suggestions if you don't think a resonator would fit.

Thanks :-)

Note: my music is a cross between Norah Jones, Fleet Foxes, and Jose Gonzalez.
Last edited by graceukulele28 at May 9, 2016,
#2
Why not? It is one way to get a different sound, and if it works, it works. I have gigged with a tricone, using it for both fingerpicking and slide. They are deficient is the bass compared with a decent flattop, so your playing style needs to be taken into account. - I would have thought they are too jangly for strumming.
#3
Quote by graceukulele28
I write more acoustic/indie/folk style and have wanted a new guitar for awhile... something different. Would a resonator be a good choice?


Certainly.
They've been extremely popular as slide guitars for blues and bluegrass music as well as a lot of other country music genres.
Might also try to find a Variax Acoustic 700 and try one of those out. They model resonators, nylon string guitars and a bunch of acoustic guitars. Discontinued, only available on the used market.
#4
Quote by Tony Done
They are deficient is the bass compared with a decent flattop, so your playing style needs to be taken into account. - I would have thought they are too jangly for strumming.


Check out Brooks Williams on Youtube - no lack of bass on his resonator.
#6
Quote by Tony Done
..[ ]...It sounds pretty jangly to me, not like a flattop in the bass. - But if that's what you like, it's good.
At what point does it actually get jangly? I listened past the 2 minute mark, and he really didn't seem like he was ever going to shut his mount...

Maybe I'm just bitter since I didn't need " vinyl record" explained to me one bit.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
It sounds pretty jangly to me, not like a flattop in the bass. - But if that's what you like, it's good.


Agreed.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
Quote by Tony Done
. . . . not? It is one way to get a different sound, and if it works, it works. . . .


Indeed. If I was doing it I'd probably set up the guitar so it plays more like a standard acoustic.
#11
When we're (G7th capos) at the NAMM show in Anaheim we're always next to the National Reso-Phonic stand. They spend all day playing - just acoustic, no amplification, and they sound great
Here's a little video of them from this year (with me in the background after about 10 seconds!!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkNUnB9XQvE


Doug Macleod is definitely worth checking out too, awesome acoustic blues player!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Th25d_PCfKw
#12
Quote by graceukulele28
I actually really enjoyed the video. The 'jangly' bits don't bother me.
When you're 67 years old, and you run into somebody over-explaining "vinyl records", it comes across as a pedantic rehashing of the widely known and patently obvious....
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 10, 2016,
#14
Jeez Tony, how old are you? I remember my father's 78 rpm copy of Rimky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade", (with 4 or so discs in a box needed to play the entire piece), but wax? Yikes!
#16
I had thought those fat old discs were bakelite. That's my guess, and I'm off to do the research.

You jogged my memory about the screw clamp steel needles. They used to come in an envelope 10 pack. (?)

Of course my daddy was an electronic tech, so we were likely the 1st kidz on the block top have crystal cartridge 45 rpm automatic changers. (Actually 3 speed, with the fat push on spindle for the 45's).

Here'z da poop from Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramophone_record
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 10, 2016,