#1
Those few db make all the difference in the world when it comes to tracking a drum set on a mix. The problem is when I work it out to 0 it feels like im cutting out the fatness and life of the drum kit. A little noise on the overheads make the cymbals sound crisp. Too much noise gives off a cheap sound. If it sounds clean and im 5 db over the limit is that acceptable or is it a no no?
#2
Digital clipping in the master bus at the end will ruin your whole master, so you'll have to limit it, I usually put in a hard limiter last to max out at -0.1 so I don't get digital clipping which ends as a pop in your mastered file. You want to avoid digital clipping above 0db at all cost.
#3
I would say; Not if you want a professional sounding mix.

If you really want that sound, I would suggest putting the sound in the actual track, not as an artifact of the output being overdriven. So that the clipped sound is there, but the master track can be safely limited/normalized.

Or maybe you might need to try something different with how you have recorded/mixed the kit altogether?
Last edited by Will Lane at May 10, 2016,
#4
Yes, but just a little bit, you should always avoid it, and it should barely affect your sound, consistently it should be always under -0,1 db, but if at some point it peaks to 0,1 or 0,2 then it's fine I guess. I though absolutely no clipping was the way, but I once put a professionally produced metal track from a popular artist in my DAW, and the master was going red lots of times, hitting numbers like +0,0-0,3 db, so I just go for what sounds better.

The clipping should NOT be noticeable in the sound though.
#5
Quote by fte85
Those few db make all the difference in the world when it comes to tracking a drum set on a mix. The problem is when I work it out to 0 it feels like im cutting out the fatness and life of the drum kit. A little noise on the overheads make the cymbals sound crisp. Too much noise gives off a cheap sound. If it sounds clean and im 5 db over the limit is that acceptable or is it a no no?


I think it depends whats clipping and how much it is clipping. High transient sounds like your snare or kick probably wont be audible at all that they are clipping a few db. But still, I try to avoid it. Lately, I have been going a little easy on the Limiting to sacrifice a bit of volume for a bit more openness.

If you want to add some life to your drums, try parallel compression (ny comp) on the whole kit. Cut the way lows and way highs first and limit it hard, then blend. Adds a lot of life in my experience
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#6
Digital clipping is not like analog clipping which often can sound very natural and in some cases pleasing to the listener. Digital clipping that you can hear is not the same at all. If you can hear it, most likely your track has quite a bit of it that is just below obvious and it can be very subliminally annoying and ear fatiguing to an average listener.

I speak from experience. I have several songs that I recorded when I got my first digital recorder (Roland VS 880) back in the late 1990's. Because I come from a long history of analog recording I tried driving the levels as hot as I could on my digital deck and ruined some otherwise decent performances that have audible digital clipping peaks (especially on the lead vocals). I can't stand listening to those older recordings which is a shame because otherwise they are well performed songs. Like diabolical said a good brick wall type limiter will stop the clipping in most cases without altering any tone and learn how to use a compressor well. It's the hardest recording tool to learn but the best tool to master. (If anyone really gets to master it.)
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 10, 2016,