#1
Hi guys,

I need your help, I have seen this (check video below) strumming pattern almost every now and then. But I'm not able to identify whether its 4/4 or other types etc.

Please brief me up regarding this strumming pattern countwise like DU=1 UDU=2 DUDU=3

So that my strum doesnt miss the beat

Thank you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIvCsiKyJ0E

He starts strumming at 0:48
#2
It's in 4/4 with kind of a syncopated feel (which is why it may be difficult to figure out the time signature) - here are the accents:

1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a

Stronger accents underlined.

I would recommend just moving your hand up and down all the time like you were playing 16ths, but you may not want to actually play every 16th. That helps you with keeping the rhythm/tempo.

So all of the strong accents would be downstrokes and all of the weaker accents would be upstrokes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at May 10, 2016,
#3
Quote by MaggaraMarine
It's in 4/4 with kind of a syncopated feel (which is why it may be difficult to figure out the time signature) - here are the accents:

1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a

Stronger accents underlined.

I would recommend just moving your hand up and down all the time like you were playing 16ths, but you may not want to actually play every 16th. That helps you with keeping the rhythm/tempo.

So all of the strong accents would be downstrokes and all of the weaker accents would be upstrokes.

Thank you very much maggara, my brain was always trying to count in the stronger accents, the reason why I got confused.
In the pattern you explained why is it a,e? Are there any special significance for a,e or can it be any character?
#4
When you count quarters, you usually count like "one-two-three-four".

When you count 8ths, you usually count like "one-and-two-and-three-and-four-and".

When you count 16ths, you usually count like "one-e-and-a-two-e-and-a-three-e-and-a-four-e-and-a".

That's why I used "e" and "a". It just makes it clearer which beat/subdivision I'm talking about. Saying "the a of the beat three" or "the and of the beat one" may be clearer to people who don't know much about theory or rhythmic notation (and it obviously also works for people who know how to read rhythmic notation), and it's also an easy way of "notating" a rhythm without using notation.

So which syllables you use to count are meaningless and have nothing to do with the "character" of the sound. "One-e-and-a" is just a common way of counting 16th notes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at May 11, 2016,