#1
This is probably a stupid question, but I have put a .70 bass string on my epiphone less Paul studio. I can tune it to drop a before the tuning key starts getting really hard to turn. Is it possible to tune to drop c at the highest without damaging the guitar? The guitar is designated to just heavy music, so I can modify it to make it work better. Any idea helps me! Thank you!
#3
You probably* won't cause damage to the structure of the instrument, but with a bass ball-end you may well do some minor harm to the tailpiece and you'll definitely have to file out the nut slot and and adjust the truss rod. Something in the 62-68 range (i.e. baritone sets) should give you plenty of tension for chuggy riffing, and it's worth bearing in mind that there does come a point that the sheer size of the string becomes more of a hindrance to your picking than its stability is an advantage.

*This means I believe it'll be absolutely fine but I refuse to be liable for anything that goes wrong because ultimately it is a higher tension than I have tried.
#4
bass strings are wound differently then guitar strings. you shouldn't use a .70 bass string. you should use a .70 guitar string.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#5
Quote by AcousticMirror
bass strings are wound differently then guitar strings. you shouldn't use a .70 bass string. you should use a .70 guitar string.

Yup, this is true; my bad.
#6
Even disregarding whether bass strings and guitar strings truly have a difference between them, a .70 is far too thick for C on a 24.75" scale lenght. If you ever managed to tune it to C, it would end up with 24lbs of tension, which would be like the low and high E on a les paul set with 10-46. Still assuming you could tune it up to C, your neck wouldn't hold the tension, it's an epiphone with a one piece neck that has absolutely no reinforcement, not a high end guitar.
I would not recommend going past .62 for C standard tuning, at this point you're at 19lbs of tension, which in my opinion is too much.

I used this very handy tool to get the tension in this post, if you ever want to research string gauges and tension when changing tuning, it is very useful, but it's worth noting linear mass's taken in account when calculating the frequency of a string, not "string thickness", which is the gauge. What this means is simply that this is not an absolute measurement of which tension you will have, it's possible that you find differences between string brands.
http://hikkyz.net/misc/stringassembler/
#7
As others have said, .70 is overkill. I play a lot in an unusual C tuning- NST- on 24.75" and 25.5" scale guitars, and I usually use the following string gauges:
C:052+ G:044+ D:030 A:016 E:011 G:009

The Dean Cadillac I have in NST has been using those gauges since @2005. No flabbiness.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#8
Quote by SaltMcBridge
Even disregarding whether bass strings and guitar strings truly have a difference between them, a .70 is far too thick for C on a 24.75" scale lenght. If you ever managed to tune it to C, it would end up with 24lbs of tension, which would be like the low and high E on a les paul set with 10-46. Still assuming you could tune it up to C, your neck wouldn't hold the tension, it's an epiphone with a one piece neck that has absolutely no reinforcement, not a high end guitar.

The neck has a truss rod in it. That's plenty of reinforcement; 24lbs is certainly on the high side, but it's not at all out of a playable range - Stevie Ray Vaughan would've been rocking something about that tension, maybe a tad tighter, and I've gone comfortably over 20lb across the board in the past. You certainly need the time to get used to it, but it's not entirely unreasonable, especially on the lowest strings. Would I recommend it? Nope. Especially not if you don't have a good couple hours a day to keep your fingers acclimatised to it. But it's not wildly out there by any means.

Quote by SaltMcBridge
I used this very handy tool to get the tension in this post, if you ever want to research string gauges and tension when changing tuning, it is very useful, but it's worth noting linear mass's taken in account when calculating the frequency of a string, not "string thickness", which is the gauge. What this means is simply that this is not an absolute measurement of which tension you will have, it's possible that you find differences between string brands.
http://hikkyz.net/misc/stringassembler/

For what it's worth, D'Addario has a similar tool that does the same thing for entire sets:
http://www.stringtensionpro.com/
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at May 16, 2016,