#1
Hi everyone.

I've been struggling in searching a cool baritone guitar I could purchase, but I still hesitate between some different axes and brands, regarding to prices, caracteristics, and everything... Moreover, as I can't -unfortunately- try one, and need to order one online if I really want to know how it sounds and how to play it, I wanted to ask for your help cause there a a lot of questions I'm asking myself right now.

First of all, these are the baritones I've found that could be O.K with my spending limit, and what I think about it; please let me know what you consider would be the best for me, or if you've already heard about these axes:
- the Squier Jazzmaster Modified Vintage Baritone: horrible Antigua colour (which is very important in the choice I'm gonna make), doesn't have a vibrato, but cheaper in cost, sounds pretty cool -according to videos I've been watching- and I saw that it was a very well done instrument, technicaly: it has a 30" scale and it's tuned A to A so I don't know if it's that correct in the idea of getting a real baritone: is this a real baritone???
- the Eastwood Sidejack Baritone DLX: kinda cool (even if I'm really not into Mosrite-like designs), great instrument as I heard, it has a vibrato and it seems to be a genuine baritone, from B to B and with a 28" scale; but there's a problem with it cause I play alone, I have a project on my own with a RC-50 loop, and in my country, there's already a very famous guy doing music like I'd like to do, who performs with... THIS Eastwood Sidejack Baritone... Goddamn'...
- the Hagstrom Viking Baritone: don't know much about the semi hollow body, it looks and sounds really great but I'm not sure it could be O.K with some fuzz or just a like crush as I'd like to play with... and it's way more expensive for me...
- the Squier Bass VI: it's NOT a baritone... I've read that it's impossible to play power chords with it, the E string sounds terrible -apparently- but it could be an alternative for my playing, using it as a guitar or -maybe- as a baritone-like... I don't know...

Well, as you can see, I'm very very doubtful about it, because I wanna make sure I need this baritone, and not a regular guitar. I think it could perfectly fit with my voice range (pretty low), and I want to discover new sounds and new playing styles. Also, I'm really into punk rock, indie, post-punk and post-hardcore music, and I adore noisy and experimental stuff. Maybe it could be a good choice.
Another thing: I would like to be sure my baritone could "cohabitate" with other standard-tuned instruments, cause I'm gonna play various instruments with my RC-50 loop, mostly the bass and an other acoustic guitar. Isn't it too difficult for the 2 differents tunings to be played together?
And the last thing which is very important: I travel a lot with my job, sometimes I leave my country and go overseas for 6 months or a year. I would like to purchase and instrument that could be complete and well balanced for what I want to do -even if I'm thinking of using it as my principal instrument. That's why I thought about the Bass VI, which is kinda hybride between bass and guitar, I could use both at the same time... dunno...

If you have questions to ask me in order for me to make sure I'm gonna go with the right choice, don't hesitate: I'll really appreciate your help with this problem I has and it's kinda driving me crazy right now because I've been studying the whole thing for months... In a few weeks I won't even have sufficiently money left, haha, that's why it would be very cool if you could indicate me your opinion, or maybe other instruments with the same price range that I don't know for the moment...

Anyway, in just a few words, THANK YOU SO MUCH in advance, I would really appreciate this...

Regards,


Benjamin

(P.S: And sorry for my bad english and for the grammatical mistakes I've made...)
#2
I mean I would start by mentioning that standard Baritone tuning is a 4th down from E standard. You can set up a normal guitar for lower tunings - I had a 25.5" scale guitar set up in Bb standard for a little while. It just requires big strings.


As far as a Bass VI being a guitar and a bass... not really. It's a niche instrument that sounds more like a bass than a guitar but isn't quite a bass.

I think the Eastwood is your best option generally speaking though. Good guitars.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#3
Thanks for your answer! Yeah, I knew that, that's why I was doubting about the Squier's tuning down to A (even if it has a 30" scale, but I don't know much about it).

Sure, I could just tune my old Hohner partner a 4th down to E standard, but I would like to seize the opportunity of affording a new instrument, and then kill two birds with one stone by purchasing a brand new one.
#4
Of the ones you listed, I'd go with either the Eastwood or the Hagstrom.

Here are some other options worth considering (yes, I know they're pricier):
http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Eastwood-Baritone-Deluxe-Map-Electric-Guitar-Sea-Foam-Green/121615725585?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D36795%26meid%3D883208be528f4431ae335420724a0217%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D181930727571

http://www.ebay.com/itm/USED-2015-REVEREND-H90-DESCENT-BARITONE-/291731286202?hash=item43ec8a28ba:g:iggAAOSwZ8ZXBbVx

http://www.amazon.com/Fender-Blacktop-Telecaster-Baritone-Fingerboard/dp/B006YTYZTI

Now, those who know me are probably expecting me to recommend the Reverend, so I will.

But I'd say even for me, it would be a coin flip between that and the Fender. That HSS configuration is unusual, and on top of that, it comes with the Bill Kirchen Tele mod applied to the controls- volume in the front, pickup switch in the back. Easier to do volume swells.

The Fender has been discontinued, and those were some of the very few I found. Some of the ones I found used were closer to your projected price range. That $999 one is supposed to be silver, not 3-tone brown. That's a good looking, flexible guitar. Here's a picture:
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

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Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at May 16, 2016,
#5
Good ones, but too bad, they're way too expansive for me (even the Hagstrom I've talked about is over the limit I had, with another thing is shipping the guitar to Europe, which worths... almost 200 dollars).
#6
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Of the ones you listed, I'd go with either the Eastwood or the Hagstrom.]


So why would you let the Squier away?
#7
Not a fan of the color, plus Squier is hit or miss in quality, and I don't know that one's rep.

I'm also not a fan of Fender products in general, but not because of quality. They make a lot of good stuff. But I have found they never seem to feel right in my hands or against my body. Its a subtle ergonomic thing that is rarely shared by clones of the original designs. But I think highly enough of that Tele that I'd be willing to risk it.

Watch the used market- two of the ones I found sold on Reverb.com were under $600.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#8
Yeah you're right, the colour is awful. But anyway I thought it could be an option for me, I was planning -if I chose this one- to get another pickguard, a black one (it would fit perfectly, don't know why Squier wanted to put these 2 Antigua patterns together, on the body and on the pickguard).
#9
Quote by Notörious Ben

Well, as you can see, I'm very very doubtful about it, because I wanna make sure I need this baritone, and not a regular guitar. I think it could perfectly fit with my voice range (pretty low), and I want to discover new sounds and new playing styles. Also, I'm really into punk rock, indie, post-punk and post-hardcore music, and I adore noisy and experimental stuff. Maybe it could be a good choice.
Another thing: I would like to be sure my baritone could "cohabitate" with other standard-tuned instruments, cause I'm gonna play various instruments with my RC-50 loop, mostly the bass and an other acoustic guitar. Isn't it too difficult for the 2 differents tunings to be played together?


First, you don't need a baritone guitar in order to sing in a baritone voice with guitar. If you need to sing in any particular key, you don't tweak the guitar; you just play a different set of chords.

Second, different instruments that are set up in different keys have always lived together (Saxes are set up in Bb, Eb, whatever); you just play the notes that you need to play for the particular song. Just as you'll play a different set of chords on a guitar to match what you're singing, you'll also play a different set of chords on the baritone to match what you're singing.

Third, remember that actual guitar sounds are actually an octave down (already) from where they're usually written. This is so that we're not always looking at bass clef when we're reading guitar music.

Fourth, you're not going to be playing the same *frets* on a baritone to match a key that you're playing a guitar; the baritone is tuned a fourth down from a standard guitar, so you'll be playing different chords in different positions on each to play in the same key.

Most "baritone" guitars have scales that are in the 27" - 29" range. 30" scale guitars are getting into the short-scale bass territory and you'll need fairly large hands to comfortably form chords in the "cowboy chord" fret range from first to fifth frets. The longer scale is mostly to allow the lower tuned-strings at the bottom end to ring out with a bit more clarity.
#10
If you just want one to try out then just get the cheapest one.

If you want a decent instrument I'd save up a bit more and grab a prs 277
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#11
I should note that we have the benefit of a whole lot of Agile instruments with longer scales at RondoMusic.com. Likely too expensive to ship to wherever you are, but worth a look anyway.
#12
I have had an OLP 30" bari, the MM5, for about eight years. It is as well made and finished as any other electric I have played, though I didn't like the original pickups - too muddy. If you believe in acoustic properties in solidbodies, this one is outstanding. It sounds much better than another guitar I have with the same pickups (SD Jazz) and electronics. They are no longer made, but I would jump at it I saw a used one come up.

FWIW, my set up is a bit unusual, open D with 13-56 strings, a very high tension for playing slide. It sizzles and chimes.
#14
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at May 17, 2016,
#15
Thanks to all of you for your accurate answers, guys! I've been checking Reverb page and Rondo website, but for the moment, all I've found is the Agile option, which looks very very cheap.

Reverb shows really cool baritones but out of my price range, once more. Excepting a couple of Danelectros, but I don't know much about it.

Some of you told me that the Squier Jazzmaster Baritone had a scale way too long (30"), but it looks like all of the Danelectros have the same (29,75" !). And I've been told Danelectro was like "THE baritone sound", so dunno...

I'm not into muddy or heavy rock distorded sound at all, more into alternative, post-hardcore, punk and indie stuff, but I have the impression like the Danelectros are not that polyvalent and balanced, and more useful in jazz or blues. Am I wrong?
#16
Quote by Notörious Ben
Thanks to all of you for your accurate answers, guys! I've been checking Reverb page and Rondo website, but for the moment, all I've found is the Agile option, which looks very very cheap.



If by "cheap" you mean inexpensive, you're correct. But Agiles have made their reputation by the reaction people have pulling them out of the box, which is most often, "Wait. I paid WHAT for this guitar?" I'm at four and counting with this...er...inexpensive brand. It's also worth noting that if you're willing to wait, you can order a semi-custom version of several of the guitars, and one of mine is one of those. If you spend a bit of time on other forums, you'll find the inevitable comparisons with far more expensive guitars.

More to the point, Rondo's owner has spent a lot of time on extended range guitar sites like sevenstring.org, and has really made a lot of guitars available to that community that were previously only available as custom orders. In addition to a wide variety of scales in instruments, you'll notice that there are 7, 8, 9 and even 10-string guitars available, as well as multi-scale (fan fret) guitars with and without trems! Rondo even offers neck-through construction on a couple of models of LP-style guitars, and the AL-3200 is one of the great bargains in guitars of that ilk. It features the same neck heel as on my $4K Axcess custom, but offers a flatter (or compound) radius and, actually, a higher spec of materials.
#17
Agile is a good quality for price option if you don't have significant import costs. Definitely worth considering.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#18
Quote by dspellman
Mine snivels and whines.


You should treat it more kindly, and not mention the V word in its presence.

Really though, long, skinny, high tension strings work very well for slide, and I've been wondering about a long scale acoustic for slide, set up in the same way.
#19
Quote by Tony Done
You should treat it more kindly, and not mention the V word in its presence.

Really though, long, skinny, high tension strings work very well for slide, and I've been wondering about a long scale acoustic for slide, set up in the same way.


I've been doing most of my slide work (if you can even call it that) on the Variax Acoustic of late. 25.5" scale, but a thin sort of smallish-bodied guitar (it's not *really* an acoustic; it just looks like one). The models include a couple of resonators, etc., and even a parlor guitar or two. The alternate tuning setup allows fast switching between Open G, Blues A, etc. I'm not good enough to justify a rack of guitars set up *just* for slide, so this works pretty well.

I'd imagine that a long scale acoustic would sound VERY nice...
#20
I only play slide on electrics, mostly in open D, so I've got no excuse for owning six of them. A Variax would be nice for instant changes of tuning, and might lead my to explore other tunings. I've been thinking about a Hipshot Trilogy bridge for years, but never committed to it.