#1
The title says it all. I'm considering giving beginning guitar lessons to earn some extra cash. I've played guitar for over ten years and minored in music, and I'm at a point where I feel confident teaching beginners. I was hoping some of you would give me some tips about getting started: finding students, teaching approaches, etc etc.


Thanks.
#2
I guess check your local guitar stores and see if they have any openings for teaching.


If not, then maybe post on your local classifieds and see if you can get students there. You could also staple flyers to places near music related things like venues or guitar stores with your number and see if you get them that way.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#3
start with basic technique first. a lot of teachers start with chords first but a noob's hand can't do it. so start with single note lines for build up technique. then maybe chords after a year.

do songs and exercises to keep them interested. for instance one you get into scales, let them take a "solo" within a scale and play an interesting progression underneath them. show them how it all applies and incentivize your teaching so that they view it as benefiting them.

go through the guitar method books that you can pick up at your local store. that helps that business like you and also allows you to have an easy supply of the books without having to order them. teach them the basic techniques first before you start going into styles/genres.
Last edited by Will Lane at May 16, 2016,
#5
Quote by Duaneclapdrix
Learn to play T Swift tunes.

And One Direction.

That's what the people want.

And be prepared for old guys that have expensive guitars, love shredders and have no time to practice.
-sigh- yuup.
Last edited by Will Lane at May 16, 2016,
#6
Or young guys that don't want to listen to you explain theory and just want you to teach them how to l337 shredz with mad sweepssss and legato runs on their first day.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#7
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Or young guys that don't want to listen to you explain theory and just want you to teach them how to l337 shredz with mad sweepssss and legato runs on their first day.
-sigh- yuup.
#9
Quote by Will Lane
start with basic technique first. a lot of teachers start with chords first but a noob's hand can't do it. so start with single note lines for build up technique. then maybe chords after a year.

do songs and exercises to keep them interested. for instance one you get into scales, let them take a "solo" within a scale and play an interesting progression underneath them. show them how it all applies and incentivize your teaching so that they view it as benefiting them.

go through the guitar method books that you can pick up at your local store. that helps that business like you and also allows you to have an easy supply of the books without having to order them. teach them the basic techniques first before you start going into styles/genres.



wtf? a year before learning chords? A month maybe would be reasonable, but after a year I was playing metallica, guns n roses, zeppelin, etc. I may have learned faster than the average, but taking a year before teaching the basic cowboy chords seems way too slow. Waiting a year before teaching more advanced chords and barre chords might make sense, but not the regular ones.
#11
If you can't handle (but I most sincerely hope you can) different tastes don't teach. And give your students free trial of like 1 hour.

Most secure thing to do is to ask your student what does he want from his guitar playing, to be able to play it around campfire or become master of shreeeding it's up to him to decide. For example, young teen comes and says "I wanna girls bruh!", you teach him campfire; the other one comes and says "I wanna van halen this rooster!" you teach him dem shreeeeding skillz
How often have we chased the dream of progress, only to see that dream perverted?
More often than not, haven't the machines we built to improve life shattered the lives of millions?
And now we want to turn that dream on ourselves, to fundamentally improve who we are.
Experience has shown me how dangerous that can be.