#1
I guess the question is do you record music according to the industry standards or do you record music the way you want to record music? Because only the artist really knows how they want their stuff to come out sounding. A lot of the times when I listen to newer songs or albums I can pick out some things I don't like about the production.

With the really heavy stuff my first impression is usually that the guitars sound too digital. The tone is so clean, that it actually does more harm than good and comes out sounding more like an edm production. I run into the same problem when I listen to drums sit inside of a mix. Only it gives you that feeling of too much too little in the drum department. Triggering or digital replacements are overly saturated and they don't sit well with guitars at all if you are after a nice tone. Or the guitars don't sound raunchy enough for the particular song.

I think I would butt heads with a producer inside of his studio.. I want to do everything the oldschool way if I can because it just sounds better in my musical opinion. Am I wrong for that? I would be a pain in the ass for any recording engineer to work with because we would have different visions. Maybe it's best I do it all on my own. The old expression if you want something done right do it yourself.
#2
You sound like a pain in the ass for sure.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#3
There's probably a right way if you are using music as an income or a way to become famous.
I'm sure there's probably some shitty formula for that.

But in general terms hell no.
#4
Yeah, there is a wrong way and it sounds like that is how you're doing it.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#5
New genres are created by doing music the "wrong way"

No offense to anyone here thats a member of a mediocre band, but that doesn't mean you know more than anyone else.
#6
If those producers 30 years ago had the means to produce albums at the level of quality of modern productions, they certainly would've done so.

I don't think you can blame a producer for tearing his hair out since you're basically asking him to make it sound like shit.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at May 16, 2016,
#7
Sure, try recording a full drum kit on your own.

How hard could it be?

Hard like my cock in TS's mom's ass
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#8
I want to post this old rock production vs new rock production example. Notice how the drums sound like you are really sitting in front of a drum set, and the guitars surround the wholeness of the track? They go together like a dance, which makes the production sound good. old rock production

VS something newer where everything is triggered up in the studio and the pro tools plugins give off that too digital to be true sound. It's not a dance like the older recording. It's a fight between the guitar and the drums to sit inside of the final mix. The kick drum sounds like an edm kind of thing and thats a little weird.

new production
#10
Quote by Will Lane at #33972193
have you ever thought about the possibility that you maybe just do not like modern br00tz.


No, that can't be it at all.


Old people are usually reasonable and not stuck in their own ways.


Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#13
Ehhhh look, as a person that's recorded with label attached producers, home producers, and even recorded other people in a studio situation... If you want to do it the old school way, you gotta be on top of your fucking game. The whole thing about sample drums, time aligning, auto-tune etc is that these days the barrier of entry is a lot lower, in the old days you'd only get people with mega talent/skills even talking to a studio, but that isn't the case anymore. So sample drums, time aligning and all that other stuff was invented to lower costs and to effectively stop endless amount of redos.

I personally can't even imagine what it would be recording on tape - it's sounds like a nightmare, both as a performer and as an engineer. Trying to play in a studio is stressful enough, knowing you have a finite amount of tries to get it right, man, no thanks.

To be absolutely honest if you're in a studio they'll want to record everything live. You've got to understand that they would absolutely love it if you came in, did it perfect across multiple takes, and then moved onto the next instrument. They want to get into the mixing/mastering as soon as possible - because that's where the time should be.

Producers are also quite open about what you want. Metal/rock producers tend to be much more laid back and kind of take the approach of 'what if you try this?'. Pop producers however... 'No no no! Do it fucking again, this is a waste of fucking time!' which is something I've been through (for the record I nailed the part several times over). If you're going into a studio with a producer you need to have a clear discussion ahead of time in regards to what you want the track to sound like. This means showing off demonstration songs for reference (this also helps for mixing/mastering). If the producer isn't keen - then he's not the producer for you.

Let's say you have two full days in the studio. You spend 1/2 to 2/3s of the first day recording instruments. The rest of the day is doing vocals, this can spill into the next day. The following day should be nothing other than mixing. Going into the studio everyone needs to be absolutely crystal clear on how all the parts mesh together and how to play their part perfectly to a click track. Also, any instruments that are playing dynamic rhythms that are not drums, 80% of the time they need to accented to match the snare hits perfectly (this can be really fecking hard)

Nothing destroys a studio session more* when the production isn't clear. So many hours have been wasted in studios because of a lack of clarity. *Except for writing parts in the studio and other elements of dicking around, such as writing vocal harmonies

I don't think you fully appreciate the role of producer and sound engineer and all the crap they go through I'd recommend you try and do everything yourself, if only so you don't go into a studio and give them a headache.
You Dont Know Me

I have 10 Anarchy Points - I also have 8 Mythology points!

Peavey Generation EXP Custom White
Yamaha 120S Black
Korg AX5G
Digitech Whammy
Zvex Fuzz Factory
Boss OS2

Quote by mrfinkle213
This man has brains.

Quote by CoreysMonster
Banned for indirect reference.
#14
Yes; any way not deemed acceptable by OP.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#15
Compromising your musical vision because a record label, producer etc., feels that your vision will not be commercially successful is a decision that you have to make. If you compromise you vision for a recording contract and a shot at fame and fortune you will have to live with that, likewise if you refuse to do so and are rejected andcend up spending the rest of your life playing in bars you have to live with that.

All bands have to compromise, at least in the beginning professional producers and recording engineers know a thing or two that amateur musicians do not. I'm sure if you wanted to mic your drums and not use triggers if you were good enough to get in that position it is something that could be worked out.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#16
Quote by fte85
I want to post this old rock production vs new rock production example. Notice how the drums sound like you are really sitting in front of a drum set, and the guitars surround the wholeness of the track? They go together like a dance, which makes the production sound good. old rock production

VS something newer where everything is triggered up in the studio and the pro tools plugins give off that too digital to be true sound. It's not a dance like the older recording. It's a fight between the guitar and the drums to sit inside of the final mix. The kick drum sounds like an edm kind of thing and thats a little weird.

new production


And where is your evidence that everything is being triggered? Honestly drum mics and room mics these days are far more advanced than they used to be. Notice how much punchier and clear the Nickelback drums are? Notice how the drums aren't as clear in the old production?

Let's reverse the situation. Let's say the new production is now the old production, and the old production is now the new production. What would you say then?

I appreciate how the drums feel 'roomier' in the older mix, but that's a mixing decision. It could be replicated in the modern mixes but it's just not the thing to do anymore. You're also not paying attention to how even the recording hardware has changed, compressors and all that stuff now is much more refined and clear. And yet they still impact tone and recording a heck of a lot, imagine back in the day when they weren't as refined.

I think the Nickelback drums sound over produced, a lot of modern drums do. A lot of guitars sound cleaner. A lot of vocals are smoother. But what can you do? If you want that vintage tone, well, you're just gonna have to pay mega for it.
You Dont Know Me

I have 10 Anarchy Points - I also have 8 Mythology points!

Peavey Generation EXP Custom White
Yamaha 120S Black
Korg AX5G
Digitech Whammy
Zvex Fuzz Factory
Boss OS2

Quote by mrfinkle213
This man has brains.

Quote by CoreysMonster
Banned for indirect reference.
#17
Don't worry about the troll comments. If you want your guitars and drums to not sit 99.99% in the mix, there's people out there who prefer that as well. A more rawish sound being recorded in the modern age is always welcomed
#18
I think a producer can fuck shit up just as easily as they can make something sound "correct"
#19
Quote by EyeNon15
I think a producer can fuck shit up just as easily as they can make something sound "correct"


I agree producers are worried about their bottom line and whether or not they think the artists vision will make them money.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#20
Quote by TwoPlusTwo
Don't worry about the troll comments.
In all fairness, you clearly haven't seen his other threads. Otherwise, you'd know that he's the troll around here. Just responding appropriately.

OT: Who even cares how you produce music when you're the best of the best unmatched by anyone in the world just being honest not trying to be mean just sayin it like it is no competition the best like holy mother of god why am I just too good at what I do kind of the best.