#1
hey everyone, I have an Aria Pro II Custom With a broken neck and im wondering if its an easy fix. a couple of years back i sold it on ebay for $750 and while on the delivery the post office broke it even though I tried to take extra precautions. now i have a guitar with a broken neck and i want to sell it. I would like to know if i can sell it for a cheaper price and let the new owner deal with the damage.
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#2
The fix itself probably won't cost too much if you are capable of doing so without professional help. However depending on the type and location of the break any self-repairs could result in very very bad situations. Like excess glue seeping onto the truss rod.

Honestly trying to sell it while it's broken like that is probably not a good idea.

Is the truss rod exposed?
Quote by Hal-Sephira

We all have the rights to be mad

So does you
#4
Quote by Victory2134
The fix itself probably won't cost too much if you are capable of doing so without professional help. However depending on the type and location of the break any self-repairs could result in very very bad situations. Like excess glue seeping onto the truss rod.

Honestly trying to sell it while it's broken like that is probably not a good idea.

Is the truss rod exposed?


The truss rod is not exposed but I feel like if I try to glue it I'm going to mess it up more. What would you think a guitar store would charge me to fix it?
#5
Quote by SeanMcbride152
The truss rod is not exposed but I feel like if I try to glue it I'm going to mess it up more. What would you think a guitar store would charge me to fix it?

Headstock repairs usually go for around $200 USD depending on how bad the break is. Repair time can be as little as a day or two to a fortnight again depending on the severity of the break.
Quote by Hal-Sephira

We all have the rights to be mad

So does you
#6
Selling a guitar with a broken neck is like going speed dating when you only have 1 ball.

The vast, vast majority of buyers aren't willing to immediately sink a substantial amount of money into a guitar the moment they buy it. Especially not when the success of the repair is not guaranteed, as is always the case with structural repairs like this.

Unless a buyer knows exactly what they're getting and has the woodworking experience to know that such a repair is likely to work, you'd be an idiot to attempt to sell it like that.

Take the guitar to a tech who has experience in repairs of this nature. You'll lose a lot of money and that sucks. But that's life.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at May 16, 2016,