#1
Last edited by haggard191 at May 17, 2016,
#2
To my eye, they all have pros and cons:

VGS. The pickups look interesting, but might be feedback-prone at high volume

Ibanez- The right look for rockabilly, but again feedback could be a problem. I'm sure I wouldn't like those pickups.

Epi. - Looks good, maybe less feedback-prone, and I like P90s. However, I'm deeply prejudiced against Epis, because Gibson turned it into an importer brand.
#3
a full hollowbody would not be a good choice for hard rock. a semi hollow like an ES-335 can work. what type of hard rock do you play? dude Epiphone has been an import brand since the early 70s seems kinda late in the game to be upset about it.
#4
Oh, I've been around guitars since before the 70s, and my prejudice does indeed date back from that time. I have to admit I did buy one once, an Epi Biscuit, but my conscience kept nagging me so I sold it. I've never claimed there was anything logical about it - some folks don't like spiders.
Last edited by Tony Done at May 17, 2016,
#5
The Wildkat is- of those 3- probably the best for rockabilly. A friend of mine has one. Not bad. But she doesn't play it often or super loud, so I don't know how it is for rock, nor how well it will stand up to hard use.

I'm going to recommend these, any of which will do the job sonically:

https://reverb.com/item/1635795-reverend-manta-ray
https://reverb.com/item/2128632-2014-reverend-manta-ray-290-w-hardshell
https://reverb.com/item/2199799-reverend-club-king-290-2011-goldtop

The difference between those first two are the pickups (HBs vs P90s), the case (gigbag vs hardshell case) and age.

The third one is a singlecut, so it is a different shape. But it's a good axe for a decent price, so I thought I'd include it.
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#6
Quote by monwobobbo
a full hollowbody would not be a good choice for hard rock. a semi hollow like an ES-335 can work. what type of hard rock do you play? dude Epiphone has been an import brand since the early 70s seems kinda late in the game to be upset about it.

Pretty much this.

I know those Hollowbody guitars are only work to play for blue, soft rock, some classic rock, power ballads, love songs, country and some rockabilly. Playing hard rock, heavy metal or any kind of metal will NOT work on any hollowbody perfectly because those guitars sounds like old music from the early and mid 20th Century.
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#7
Playing hard rock, heavy metal or any kind of metal will NOT work on any hollowbody perfectly because those guitars sounds like old music from the early and mid 20th Century.


Billy Duffy, Ted Nugent, Ben Burnley, Chris Poland, Ihsahn, Tosin Abasi and some others would like to see you in yonder dark alley to discuss the veracity of this assertion.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
Quote by AcousticMirror
You can play metal on a hollow body. Who says you can't.



That's much closer to a chambered LP than it is a hollow body as we know them. A thicker PRS hollowbody is less appropriate (I know, I've tried this one):



If you don't mind dealing with feedback in loud amp conditions, they'll work.
But deal with it you must.
#10
My Epiphone FlameKat used to be my main gigging guitar. Of course the looks were the main Argument but it worked. I wouldn´t have used it, albeit with stock pick ups, if it had sounded bad.
#11
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Billy Duffy, Ted Nugent, Ben Burnley, Chris Poland, Ihsahn, Tosin Abasi and some others would like to see you in yonder dark alley to discuss the veracity of this assertion.

+1
Nugent even uses a hollow body with a 5150/6505 and gets some pretty cool tones out if that ser up.

Although a semi hollow such as the aforementioned ES335 might be a little easier to control as far as feedback is concerned.

I've been actually GASing for a ES335 or a Dot for quite some time and I play in a pretty heavy band
Last edited by tsc86 at May 18, 2016,
#12
Pepper Keenen uses a semi. that is good enough for me. lol.
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#13
The Epiphone Wildcat is a great choice for rockabilly sound. I own an Ibanez AF-75 and while I love it for jazz and mellow sounds it is a true hollow body and will feed back easily at high volume. It also has limited access to the upper frets which you can see in a picture of the guitar. It's not a good rock or rockabilly guitar. It wasn't designed for that style but does have an awesome fat sound.

Note: If you do go for the Wildcat be sure to get the modal with the Bigsby vibrato. A Bigsby B7 Vibrato by itself is worth $130-150 and it comes installed and aligned well. If you buy one without the Bigsby and want to add one later (you will) it will cost you more that the difference between the Wildcat with it and one without. While this Bigsby B7 is the overseas manufactured one, it is designed and authorized by Bigsby. American made B7 Bigsby cost considerably more. I have two guitars with US made B7's and two with the authorized overseas versions and as far as playability they both do the job well as a vibrato. If you are looking for a dive bombing or other more intense vibrato effects a Bigsby won't do it but for real rockabilly sounds, a Bigsby is the classic.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 18, 2016,
#14
I think one of the keys to using any hollowbody guitar on stage is controlling stage volume. A lot of acts actually have pretty low volume ON the stage, allowing for better vocal sound. With almost everything run through a PA system, volume to the audience is dependent on the sound guys and it's possible to have a hospitable environment for a hollowbody where you're actually playing it.
#15
Just a thought, but might an Epi Riviera suit?

Semi-hollow, Bigsby, 3 P90s, double cutaway for upper fret access.
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#16
I like the middle pickup sound on the Rivera for that hollow kind of Gretsch sound. I've played one but I don't own one. Good choice for rockabilly.
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#17
I vote for the reverend Club King 290 those things are awesome, I saw Unknown Hinson ripping it up on his signature model a couple weeks back at Rverenvd Horton Heat show those guitars are nice.
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#18
In my admittedly small amount of personal experience thus far with stock P90s, Reverends have the best of any production guitar I've tried under $1200.

FWIW, their RevTron equipped guitars are also quite killer for rockabilly/psychobilly and similar stuff. The RevTrons are a miniHB that is made to be a hotter version of the old FillerTron pickups. They make a few semihollows and hollowbodies that have them. They're going to be hard to find in the assumed price range, however.
https://reverb.com/marketplace?query=reverend%20tricky%20gomez%20rt

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https://reverb.com/marketplace?query=reverend+club+King++rt
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#19
you should take a look on the hagstrom models...different Body sizes and pick ups available...i checked them out on last year's frankfurt music fair...great stuff.

"optically" my first choice would be the artcore vintage...
#20
Quote by monwobobbo
a full hollowbody would not be a good choice for hard rock. a semi hollow like an ES-335 can work. what type of hard rock do you play? dude Epiphone has been an import brand since the early 70s seems kinda late in the game to be upset about it.

This^
#21
Check out the Epiphone Sheraton 2
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#22
Hagstrom has some nice semihollows out there, though I'm personally more interested in one of their 3P90 & trem-equipped LP-style guitars right now...
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#23
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at May 19, 2016,
#24
Even my semi Gibson ES333 used to feedback on stage and that had a centre block.Mind i did have a 60 watt Marshall tube amp 6 inches behind me at high volume.But these are the conditions you sometimes have to deal with when gigging in some places.A hollowbody would have been unusable for me in that situation,The semi was bad enough,I had to keep my hand on the strings at all times until i could turn down the guitar volume in between songs.
#25
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Pretty much this.

I know those Hollowbody guitars are only work to play for blue, soft rock, some classic rock, power ballads, love songs, country and some rockabilly. Playing hard rock, heavy metal or any kind of metal will NOT work on any hollowbody perfectly because those guitars sounds like old music from the early and mid 20th Century.
IIRC, Alex Lifeson from Rush used an ES-335 early on. Circa "2112"..

I saw Brian Adams playing,"Summer o '69" on a full depth arch top.

I'd sort of like to experiment with an ES-3xx "Lucille", as they have no F-holes. Likely the next best thing to a hollow, "lightened" (?) Les Paul.

Besides, the 70's amplifiers and pickups contributed greatly to those 70's sounds, not simply the guitar body style.

I'd say you're quite right, you couldn't do metal on a Gretsch, "Country Gentleman", and certainly not with the stock pickups. Those are full hollow, not the "tone block" variants like all of the Gibson ES-3 zies.

Quote by EyeballPaul
Even my semi Gibson ES333 used to feedback on stage and that had a centre block.Mind i did have a 60 watt Marshall tube amp 6 inches behind me at high volume.But these are the conditions you sometimes have to deal with when gigging in some places.A hollowbody would have been unusable for me in that situation,The semi was bad enough,I had to keep my hand on the strings at all times until i could turn down the guitar volume in between songs.
You gotta admit, a lot of the crunch these days is software, pumped out the PA.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 19, 2016,
#26
+1 for EyeballPaul's comment. I had a situation where I did a gig with my Ibanez AF-75 hollow body and it was a very small stage. I was using a Vox VT30 amp on an amp stand but I was only about two feet in front of the amp. I couldn't turn around to make any changes on my amp because it would howl with feedback immediately. I do love the sound of the Ibanez AF-75 because it's deep with a lot of clear low end but it feeds back really easily at higher volumes.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#27
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Billy Duffy, Ted Nugent, Ben Burnley, Chris Poland, Ihsahn, Tosin Abasi and some others would like to see you in yonder dark alley to discuss the veracity of this assertion.


most of those guys don't use full hollowbodies. ok yes Ted used the Byrdland back in the day and had tons of feedback issues. he had to stuff foam into his guitar to cut back on feedback. notice that Ted doesn't use them any more. as for Billy he used a Les Paul for much of his actual hard rock material not the gretsch. this is why I asked the OP what exactly he was trying to do. didn't say it couldn't be done just that hollows weren't the best choice.
#28
I didn't say it was ideal either. But the statement to which I replied was absolutist, dismissive, and factually lacking.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#29
Quote by dannyalcatraz
I didn't say it was ideal either. But the statement to which I replied was absolutist, dismissive, and factually lacking.


I understand but he was responding to something I said. there are always going to be exceptions to any "rule" guess everyone needs to learn that.