#1
I want to get wifi in my garage.
It's a seperate building about 150ft from the house.
The cable company won't sell me another hookup because the garage would need it's own seperate mailing adress


Any ideas on what to do?
#6
maybe you should have thought about that before buying the place lol

i'd get cellular data and use that when out of the house, there's also USB wfi ports out there for laptops and even phones, that connect to your home or cellular data, so you can use to have wifi anywhere you go.
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#7
I would just run a switch in the house and run an ehternet cable underground to another switch in the garage and then connect a wireless router to the garage.

The challenging part is burying the cable.
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#8
max length for cat5 cable is 100 meters, so I'm with RBM.

edit: I'm seeing some sites saying 100 and some saying 90. either way it's like double the distance you need.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at May 19, 2016,
#9
What does the ethernet cable connect to the modem then out the garage and connects to???
#10
powerlines are good if they are on the same circuit/fuse box. I use one myself as our fibre box had to go downstairs while everyone browses mostly upstairs and signal is crap through the floors/rooms. just got put a basic lan plug in downstairs and a wifi plug upstairs and everyone is happy (I run the downstairs one from lan from a wifi router so there are two wifi networks in the house and everyone just connects to the one with best strength in their room)

I think if your garage is on a separate fuse so powerline isn't going to work just getting a nice long ethernet cable is your best bet (they are pretty cheap and can be "outdoor" proof as other cables people have running outside their house). then just stick a wifi box in your garage and connect the ethernet to it.

Quote by JackalUK
Yea, does it have a shared electrical supply. If it does you might be able to use one of these kinda things

http://www.techradar.com/news/networking/powerline-networking-what-you-need-to-know-930691

Run it to the garage and then hook up to a wireless router.


you can get powerline adapters with wifi built in, so can just connect the "start" plug to existing modem/router and then have just a wifi "end" powerline plug
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#12
Cable Company->Modem/Router combo box. This gives you your current WiFi setup

From Modem/Router box- you likely have LAN ports on the back of the box. You'd run a piece of Cat5e wire from one of those to the garage - though you might benefit from getting 1/2" PVC piping and dropping it down into the lawn to protect the Cat5 from critters and shovels.

When you get that cable into the garage, you can connect it to either an old gateway/router with the router part turned off or a multi-port unmanaged switch.
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#13
Quote by RBM01991
I would just run a switch in the house and run an ehternet cable underground to another switch in the garage and then connect a wireless router to the garage.

The challenging part is burying the cable.



yea but I think you can get some heavy duty cat cables that will be fine just anchoring to walls/fences if those are available.

I know with our garden shed lighting/plugs we didn't bury the power cables (like 50m away from the house maybe) but just anchored them along a fence all the way there. burying is just a matter of putting it through some plastic pipe and hoping it never dies, requiring you to dig the whole thing up to replace it.
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#15
It depends on what kind of setup you have. The router is what distributes the internet to various devices in your house, whether it's through wifi or a cable plugged into it. The modem is the thing that communicates with the internet. The modem is plugged into the cables that actually go out to the ISP, then the router is plugged into your modem, and PCs are plugged into the router, and the router puts out a wireless signal that phones and laptops can pick up.

Your modem could also be functioning as a router. Basically, do you have two boxes or just one currently? Either way, if you've got free ports on the back you should be able to buy another router and run an ethernet cable to it. It'll also take a little configuration. Since this is a more complicated setup I'm sure you'll have to go into the router's setup page, which is why I linked to the lynksis support page on the topic. If you have a different brand then you may want to check out their support page on how to do this.
#17
Will ethernet cable still work at that length?
I'm guessing its around 150ft maybe more.
#19
Quote by EyeNon15
Will ethernet cable still work at that length?
I'm guessing its around 150ft maybe more.

yea, as I said earlier, the max length of cat5 is around twice as long as what you're doing. I should have said ethernet cable instead to avoid confusion. cat5, cat5e, and cat6 are all types of ethernet cables, and they're backwards compatible, it's just that the better ones are made better. any of them should work though. I'd be sure and measure exactly how far you need it to be before you buy it though.


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=150+ft+ethernet+cable+outdoor&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3A150+ft+ethernet+cable+outdoor
#20
Standard Ethernet cables go for about 100m (but ideally, 90m is the farthest distance I'd recommend using, if longer - find another solution, such as Fiber). 150ft is roughly 46m, so you could run Ethernet underground up to your garage to an Access Point (AP) and have it broadcast WiFi there. I think that would be ideal, just make sure you configure the AP to a channel that doesn't interfere with other channels nearby. Since you're only aiming to use it in the garage, ideally you'd want to use equipment supporting the 5 GHz freq range because it's:
1: Better performing/faster
2: Harder to interfere with other channels
3: Its broadcast radius is smaller than the 2.4 GHz range (which is ideal for your solution).

If you're aiming for speed and capacity, I'd recommend a similar solution with Fiber cables and possibly and additional switch in your garage.

Another solution would be to have an exterior AP on the garage with a directional antenna that'll connect to your WiFi through a Mesh topology. If you ask me, that's a solution you'd use if literally everything else isn't working.

Good luck!
#21
At 150' you should be able to get good signal assuming you have a decent access point and a decent receiver. I can hit mine from much further away than that.

I wouldn't bother running an ethernet cable, I'd just get a good access point and mount it as near to the garage as I could.

If you're using the cable company access point that's your first problem, most of them are shit. I use these at work and home and have had excellent luck thus far.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PDLRHFW?psc=1
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#22
Run a massive ethernet cable

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#23
Wi-Fi is nothing more than a digital radio signal, typically on the 2.4 or 5 Ghz frequency bands transmitted by ypur hot spot device. You can buy Wi-Fi repeater devices. The better units have removable antennas with SMA type connectors. These are easy to replace with high gain antennas of +3db (or higher) gain. Some of these antennas are directional. These are typically referred to as Yagi style antennas. Some of these Yagi antennas have much higher +12 db gain!

The best places to get this type of gear is from a Ham Radio Outlet (HamRadio.com) or Radio Shack store, or from the internet.

This is a way to entirely eliminate having to hard wire the run to your remote building.

Bear in mind that the Effective Radiated Power (ERP) from any of the Wi-Fi units is limited largely based on their restricted power Transmitters. Using a replacement antenna effectively boosts the over the air signal by the amount of gain designed into the antenna. Thus using a +3db gain antenna will double your effective signal strength! Using a +12 db gain antenna will increase your signal by 400%! If you setup a directional antenna the wireless link will be directional and even more effective.
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#24
Quote by MusicLaw
Wi-Fi is nothing more than a digital radio signal, typically on the 2.4 or 5 Ghz frequency bands transmitted by ypur hot spot device. You can buy Wi-Fi repeater devices.


I think that's what I have.
I got this thing from Best Buy for $20 called a wifi range extender. I just plugged it into an outlet in the garage and that's it.
It's a tad bit slow but nothing major.