Poll: Which way u would prefer recording to be done
Poll Options
View poll results: Which way u would prefer recording to be done
Audio-in Interface
4 29%
Redording amp/cab with a mic
7 50%
No special preference between the two
3 21%
Voters: 14.
#2
Suppose I'm not understanding the question as options 1 and 2 are sorta 1-in-the-same.

Is the first one direct in through an interface, second mic'd cab through whatever medium it takes to get on the computer, and 3 "whatever"?
Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance - Confucius
#3
1.Yes
2. Put the mic to the cab no interface at all,and then mix it through pc
3.Yes
#5
Your question doesn't really make any sense because you're going to be using an interface with the mic anyway.

Are you talking about DI?

I prefer to take a DI and then reamp that so it'd be both options.
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Recording gear:
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#6
The second option is using a mic to record the amp and send the signal to the computer from an adapter or USB and have your sound mixed not with the interface/adapter but a pc programm
#7
I vote "none of the above". I go from a mic to a tube pre-amp then to a digital mixer then to either my stand alone workstation or my computer via an interface.

Maybe I'm just not understanding the question.
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#8
Quote by DHF1234
The second option is using a mic to record the amp and send the signal to the computer from an adapter or USB and have your sound mixed not with the interface/adapter but a pc programm
Read the Introduction to Recording Sticky. USB Mics and other "adapter" mics are not of good quality at all compared to a standard microphone and an audio interface. Audio Interfaces properly convert the analog signal of the microphone to a digital signal that the computer can read properly. There is no "either or" with professional recording with a computer.

Mic'd amp > Audio Interface > Digital Audio Workstation.

Or, if you rather:

Direct Input from Guitar > Audio Interface > Amp/Effects Sim > DAW.
Last edited by Will Lane at May 25, 2016,
#9
I'd like to start recording with a mic through my amp but I have some worries on if it'll sound just like my amp, how sensitive the mic is to other sounds, and what mic to buy, I've been told that the SM-57 is the way to go but haven't made a decision on what to do. I have a Focusrite running through reaper and I'm stuck there on what to do to get a tone I like.
#10
Quote by ChrisCrabtree
I'd like to start recording with a mic through my amp but I have some worries on if it'll sound just like my amp, how sensitive the mic is to other sounds, and what mic to buy, I've been told that the SM-57 is the way to go but haven't made a decision on what to do. I have a Focusrite running through reaper and I'm stuck there on what to do to get a tone I like.


Terrabytes of conflicting information is written about this very subject across the net. It will be very hard for you to sort the wheat from the chaff, but it is worth a decent read.

In short, a mic won't sound like your ear. Doesn't matter what mic. Moving a mic a milimeter, or pointing it a degree different, will have a DRASTICALLY different sound

Learn very early on how to NOT "listen with your knees" - in other words, a recording of a guitar is not going to feel anything like standing in a room with a giant cabinet. The mic is there to capture sounds, not the rumble of an amplifier actually moving the air in the room and making you feel things with parts of your body other than your ears. This goes quadruple for recording kick drums!

You will find celebrations of multi-mic recording techniques all over the net, but the truth is, a hit won't be separated from a dud just because one mic was used instead of ten. That said, it is a worthy endeavor to learn multi mic techniques, but you better be able to get a sound you like with one mic as well.

The 57 is often regarded as a desert island mic, because it can be used for just about anything well enough, and is mechanically reliable and durable, even to the point of engineers using it to hammer nails in or adjust bent speaker grills with

No mic, no micing technique, no magic sauce in the universe will make a recording sound exactly like your amp. Usually that isn't even a goal you want anyway, you want a sound that works in the mix FOR the song you are working on