#1
Bob Dylan is 75 today.

I'd like to wish him a very happy birthday and thank him for all the wonderful music he has given us.
#3
wow, bob dylan is 75! he's brought us some wonderful songs
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#4
He's an old man! A friend/moron from work claims that Dylan sold his soul to "the Devil" (notice the small "t"). Anyway since Dylan's best songs were best performed by people other than himself I thought it would be interesting to link some of those interpretations of one of his songs. "Don't Think Twice It's Alright" was a massive hit for Peter, Paul and Mary. Dylan claimed he was shocked when Paul Stookey presented him $5,000 (Dylan's cut due to songwriter credits). Anyway Dylan has done pretty well for himself. Not bad for a Minnesota jewish kid

Here's one that is interesting for many reasons. Peter Paul and Mary about 10-15 years after the group broke up. 1) It's apparently on a Japanese or Chinese TV broadcast. 2) Noel Stookey ("Paul") shows his picking style and he's a great player 3) the standup bass in the background is about 3 times as loud as it should be. I think that is why Stookey has some odd expressions during the performance. Stookey's expression about halfway through the song reminds me of a pedophile working an ice cream stand. Peter Yarrow, the other guitarist in the video, is the guy who wrote "Puff The Magic Dragon" and who spent 3 months in jail for ...uh...getting to know a young female fan a little too well He's an old guy now trying to fight bullying in schools and other humanist causes.

Damn fingerstyle sounds awesome when you have two good pickers playing together doesn't it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGpkS7LhKl8
Last edited by TobusRex at May 26, 2016,
#5
Here's another cover of the same song, this time by Dylan's cute little latina girlfriend Joan Baez. Joan is the prototype of the bleeding heart hippie type, all peace and love. Interesting point...she was famous before anybody knew who Bob Dylan was. She got her first record deal 3 or 4 years before meeting Bob.

Does this sound close at all to the Peter, Paul, and Mary version? Not to my ears. This version is far closer to the original that Bob did. But better. Joan was a far better player and singer than Dylan was. Anyway...Peter, Paul and Mary's version was the one that made a ton of money, not this by Joan or her boyfriend's version.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYeXvG2ptwk
#6
Here's another interpretation. This time it's a country version. The Indigo Girls. Pretty good musicians. I understand they are all lesbians and that the mandolin player has a pretty good punk band (in which she plays guitar). Anyway the red headed lady has one helluva set of pipes on her. The other guitar player is pretty damn cute, a pretty good singer too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUQPKdYyoxs
#7
Finally....here's Bob's version. Was Bob playing guitar on this? Some people say yeah he was....some say it was another guy on guitar. Anyway....very "Woody Guthrie"-ish.

Interesting song. I think we can all agree that the other versions were far more accomplished sounding, but this version has a rough charm of it's own.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-Y3KfJs6T0
#8
Sorry to go off on a tangent. It's just that I've always thought the most interesting thing about Dylan's work is how open it is to vastly different interpretations. It's like Dylan was the first guy blazing trails on some of these tunes and then the settlers moved in and made things better

In apologies to Bob, I'm posting some awesome country blues he did covering somebody else's work. Yes...this is my favorite version of this tune. The guitar work reminds me of Fahey (yes, I know Dylan wasn't in Fahey's class...but this rough bluesy stuff is something Fahey would've relished).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcqnCzC-8d8
Last edited by TobusRex at May 26, 2016,
#9
This is going to be Bruce Springsteen performing what I consider to be Bob Dylan's finest song, barre none, "Chimes of Freedom". This is in East Germany, about a year before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The crowd is estimated at up to 300,000.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBIcfPBVxxQ

I'm adding what, (again IMHO), I believe to be Dylan's finest song. (I know I said that last time with "Chimes of Freedom", but it really depends on my mood ).

This is a really oddball version oi it by one "Georgia Whiting". At the 3rd verse in the video, she does even strum one o' them thar' Ricketybacker 12 strangs... (*)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nErRGYzMOzA

(*) I wunner whur she gitted thet ideer?
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 26, 2016,
#11
Quote by Tony Done
Bruce can make anything sound good
Yeah, his live reading of "Chimes of Freedom", (from a Live EP), is the best sonically of any rendition I've ever heard. That track from East Germany is quite weak by comparison.

Like you, I'm sick to death of "Blowing in the Wind". five decades is enough, already!.

However, CoF is simply the best song metaphorically I think I've ever heard. I think most people would just be concerned keeping dry, not developing this massive soundtrack or hidden meaning to a violent thunderstorm. The trigger word is "trapped"and it juxtaposes every "trapped individual", in every "trapped situation", one can imagine. While not specifically political, it does highlight man's inhumanity to man.

Quote by Tony Done
Ms Whiting is photogenic.
Ms. Whiting is abundantly photogenic, on the order of Courteney Cox as a 20 year old

Quote by Tony Done
I'm a big fan of Bob Dylan, but in general I prefer his love songs to his political ones, I think that they have aged better.
Well, I think you should consider Joan Baez' moving epistle to loving Bob Dylan alongside anything you'd heard from him on the topic.. Sort of an "anti-love song", if you will.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MSwBM_CbyY

Moving on, if you think "My Back Pages", is a political song, you simply haven't listened closely enough. MBP is Dylan trowing in the towel to his youthful, former political self. His concession to compromise, and his realization you can't fight or change the whole world's mind, by saturating it with raw idealism. The irony of that isn't lost on him as he muses, "I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now"

A parallel to this would be Al Stewart's, "Roads to Moscow". As a 20 something year old, Stewart manages to compress the German "Blitzkrieg" invasion of Russia, into about 9 minutes of immersive history.

Now, he sits at home and writes albums about his wine cellar. How the mighty wordy have fallen....
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 26, 2016,
#12
Yeah, one of the admirable things about him is his constant changing of style. He is very much his own man.

Some of Bob's love songs are pretty gloomy. Two of my favourites are "Don't think twice"and "One too many mornings", and Rolling Stone reckons that "Like a rolling stone"is the best rock(?) song ever.
#13
Quote by Tony Done
. . . Yeah, one of the admirable things about him is his constant changing of style. He is very much his own man. . . .


That nails it precisely, Tony.

He does what he wants to do - and if you don't like it, it's your problem, not his.
#14
I still can't get over how completely smitten I am with Georgia Whiting and her rendition of, "My Back Pages".

I also really like the growly, slidey thing one of the guitar guys does does on the tonic.... "wha-ao-oow", with lots of gain....

(Actually he (?) does it on I & V )
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 27, 2016,
#15
Quote by Captaincranky
I still can't get over how completely smitten I am with Georgia Whiting and her rendition of, "My Back Pages".

I also really like the growly, slidey thing one of the guitar guys does does on the tonic.... "wha-ao-oow", with lots of gain....

(Actually he (?) does it on I & V )


I'm sure it has nothing to do with the fact that she is a gorgeous woman

I didn't know CoF was a Dylan song, thought it was the Byrds! On the other hand they performed a lot of his stuff.
#16
Quote by TobusRex
I'm sure it has nothing to do with the fact that she is a gorgeous woman
Actually, it has a great deal to do with the fact she's a beautiful young woman. First, I love female vocalists. I love to joke that listening to them fulfills a sexual and need for a maternal voice. Then when that need has been sated, you walk over to the CD player, and push "stop". Nag-in over and done with!

But it is very nice to listen to an soothing alto voice, delivered with a young lady who presents as having a reverence for the lessons of the 60's & 70's.

OTOH, "American Idol" winner Carrie Underwood"s latest album, is little more than noise. She seem s to be saying, "look at me people, I have 8 lungs and I'm trying to grow a 9th". So, she practically screams from start to finish, while taking on the woes of the dating experience, trashing men to the repeat and fade, until the bitter end of the album. And well, Taylor Swift, who used to be such a nice girl, is now an off key pop princess with supermodel BFF's. (Oh OK, I"m just pissed that' she's too tall for me). Although, I'd still like to bang her, I just wouldn't want to sit through one of her "concerts".

Which is why I've given up completely on American, "pseudo country power pop", and taken to listening to "European opera metal". (The Ukraine has the hottest naked women, while Germany & Norway have the best trained/accomplished singers).

Quote by TobusRex
I didn't know CoF was a Dylan song, thought it was the Byrds! On the other hand they performed a lot of his stuff.

Of the 6 tracks, side 1 of their, "The Byrds Greatest Hits" album, 3 tracks are Dylan, 2 are Seegar, (Dylan's mentor / hero), and only one is written by a "Byrd".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Byrds'_Greatest_Hits

Dylan's 2 songs I've mentioned, "My Back Pages" &, "Chimes of Freedom", are possibly the most lyrically complex abstract conceptualizations ever put to music. It's difficult to separate whether they're the result of the "mind expanding substances of the times", or if Dylan was an "English savant". When he does do on camera interviews, he seems to present as having a touch of autism. He's abundantly clear on paper, but not so much in person. I suppose we'll never know.

He also has the dubious distinction of having invented "rap", with his, "Subterranean Homesick Blues" Give that another listen if you have the time.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 27, 2016,