#1
Iv been playing for about a year now and decided to post a solo to see where i stand at the my one year mark. let me know what you guys think and what needs work. i know my bends might be a little off and i seem to be stuck in that pentantic "box", this piece is mainly that. its in Am. let me know what you think critique it as hard as you can i need the constructive criticism.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOSmgElo9kI
#3
Pretty good, but watch your dissonance
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#4
thats what the title was where i downloaded the backing from.
Last edited by kevdub94 at May 24, 2016,
#5
For someone who's only being playing for a year that's not too bad. I think a couple of things you could look at is thinking about when to move to a different box shape. I skimmed the vid but it always seemed like you were in one box shape.

The other is that in Motown tunes and early rock n roll solo's were crafted with lines that included chords, whether its just two strings, three strings. See if you can add that in there.
#6
Pretty good, especially considering how long you've been playing. Other than sticking strictly to the pentatonic, which you're aware of and isn't necessarily a bad thing, the main thing I'd reccomend would be more rhythmic diversity. You did have longer and shorter notes, but try playing around with staccato sounds and cutting notes short, leaving some space between the notes sometimes. That's also kinda a stylistic thing and maybe not what you were going for on that track, but it works well to build tension.

But all in all, good job! You're coming along nicely.
#7
Not bad for your first attempt!

First thing I would recommend is make sure your guitar is tune, a couple of your higher strings sounded out.

Second, try to limit yourself to a shorter solo, maybe two times through the progression. You'll almost never hear a 4 minute solo in any song, unless it's like a jam band or something. This will force you to give more direction to your solo if you know exactly when it will start and end. Make the ending sound like an ending, build your solo to a peak either at or right before the end.

Last thing I would say is to outline the chord progression some more. This means you have to know what notes are in the chords of the song. Your first chord is an A minor, the notes are A, C, and E. The second chord is D minor, D, F and A. Last chord is E7, E, G#, B and D. Try to land on one of the notes of the chord when the chord changes, especially the G# of the E7 chord. This will make it sound like you really know your stuff and aren't just noodling around the pentatonic scale.


EDIT: my bad, there are a couple more chords in the song, but the same thing applies for those too
Last edited by MeGaDeth2314 at May 24, 2016,
#9
Leave space between phrases when playing blues or any genre! That's what separates the boys from the men. Don't just play without resting. Hold a note for a while or be silent for a few seconds.
#10
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beat me to it

no but srsly for a year that is really good. keep playing. work on phrasing. steal licks.
Last edited by Will Lane at May 25, 2016,
#12
You remind me a bit of Neil Young. There's nothing wrong with playing the Pentatonic scale. It's actually pretty much the most versatile scale ever. Just learn it, 2 notes per string, starting on all 5 different notes. Then tap a 3rd note per string(:
#14
For a one year progress that's really good! There are occassional notes that are a bit off beat and a bit out of tune(especially on the bends). But overall technique and note choice is good.
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