#1
Just curious on thoughts. I have been using Boss effect boards for years, thinking how great it is to have all these effects in one board. Thing is, I very rarely use any of them and usually just use a few presets and sometimes tweak it. I currently use the Boss GT10 and it can get pretty complicated to navigate and piece together a good sound. So, Ive been thinking of simplifying my setup and just getting some pedals.. I run everything through a Mesa Dual Rect Roadster head so I really want to start taking advantage of the amp now and not rely on this damn board.

What are some of your opinions on boards vs individual pedals?? One thing I think that always deterred me from pedals was having to hit different pedals at different times. But the more i think...I only really use a few effects, distortion, chorus, delay sometimes. So I am thinking of just grabbing a few and going the old school route.
#2
Well, I go for individual pedals.

Essentially, I have a clean and OD channel on the amp(which has a boost and reverb built in), and sometimes I add a phaser, delay or wah. Mostly only one at a time on top of the channel I'm using, and generally if I've got the phaser and the delay on, they're on for the whole song.

So pedals work fine for me. YMMV.
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#4
Over the years I go back and forth. I never sell any of my older stuff (just to lazy to do it) so I have quite a collection of effects pedals and multi effects pedals. I probably own 20-30 individual pedals dating back to my Maestro Boomerang Wah from the early 70's. In the 80's I was using a lot of individual pedals (mostly Ibanez, Boss and MXR) and I still own them. In the early 90's I got my first multi effects an Ibanez PT3 which I used for many years. Then I went back to individual pedals in the late 90's. I have gone back and forth like this using two different BOSS multi pedals in the 2000's starting with a BOSS ME-30 then going to a BOSS ME-50. Although they both worked well for my needs I was still never 100% satisfied and drifted back to individual pedals every few years. About 3 months ago I bought a Digitech RP500 that I have been using and so far I like it because the sounds are very good and it has high Hz outputs to go to my amp plus low Hz outputs that I can use to the PA. To make matters even more confusing I have a modeling amp with more effects and saved patches (which I set to amp and effect bypass mode when using my multi effects).

So the original question is which do I prefer? Let's see........... what day is it. My preference changes about every 6 months.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 26, 2016,
#5
I have both individual pedals and an assortment of MFX units. I use them different ways.

The MFX devices are used for quiet practice- they all have headphone jacks (a must for me)- and for tone shopping. As in I use them to decide what kinds of tones I need on a particular piece. I then buy a pedal for that tone if I don't already have one.*

But the pedals are what I use to craft the final version of what I want to do with a song.

And, of course, YMMV. Others prefer MFX units for everything. Some mix & match. I remember a touring rig rundown for Steve Stevens a couple years ago: not only did he have multiple guitars & amps, his rig included MFX units, discreet pedals AND rack mounted devices as well. It may have been the most complex working rig I've ever seen.


* and sometimes, even if I do.
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#6
pedal guy. I keep things pretty simple so no real need for presets etc. multi-fx are great for those who change sounds constanly or would need to to do a big tap dance to get the right sound for some songs.

for your situation you may well want to keep the G-10 and use it for time based efx in the loop and get an overdrive and perhaps a wah for in front of the amp. you could then program the time based stuff into a few patches for easy access. this type of setup would give you maximum flexibility and keep it fairly simple after the initial work.
#7
Individual pedals allow for 100% tonal customization, where with a multi-effects pedal you're stuck with whatever sounds the multi-effects can make.
..I was watching my death.
#8
Quote by timbit2006
Individual pedals allow for 100% tonal customization, where with a multi-effects pedal you're stuck with whatever sounds the multi-effects can make.

You make it seem like you can't control individual fx on a mfx, most have the same controls as a pedal. There are exceptions both ways.


I'm with Will, my rig has evolved into individual pedals for gain in front, mfx in the loop for delay, reverb, looper, etc. Imo its the best of both worlds.
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#9
Thats actually an idea I did not think of. I keep my sounds fairly simple, but just spend too much time figuring out the right distortion sound or whatever and there are just a few pedals I was thinking of getting.

WOuld it be wise to use the GT-10 EQ as well or just get an EQ pedal?
#10
Quote by lucky1978
You make it seem like you can't control individual fx on a mfx, most have the same controls as a pedal. There are exceptions both ways.


How?
With a multi-FX you're limited to whatever the unit has programmed or built into it, yeah of course you can change the parameters of the effect in a multi-fx, but what if you can't really get the sound you want?
With pedals you could just swap that individual pedal out.
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#11
Quote by timbit2006
How?
With a multi-FX you're limited to whatever the unit has programmed or built into it, yeah of course you can change the parameters of the effect in a multi-fx, but what if you can't really get the sound you want?
With pedals you could just swap that individual pedal out.
Yes, the individual units in the multi-effects are just as adjustable as physical units, but the multi-effects can only model so many different effects. Whereas you can have many physical units that do something the multi-effects can't.

The key here is that a versatile multi like the Zoom G3 costs about $169 USD, whereas a standalone unit that does one thing is probably around $100 USD.
#12
Quote by Will Lane

The key here is that a versatile multi like the Zoom G3 costs about $169 USD, whereas a standalone unit that does one thing is probably around $100 USD.


That's a pretty damn good point. I'm way past entry level gear, so I hadn't really thought about it from that perspective.
..I was watching my death.
#13
A really good MFX unit can be very adjustable. But I will say that a I have yet to try one that didn't have at least a couple of models that are absolutely awful...to me, at least,

There's also the malfunction issue. If an individual pedal breaks, you can repair or replace the individual pedal. If a MFX breaks, until you repair or replace it, you lose EVERYTHING you've programmed in.

But on the flip side, with an MFX unit, you have many fewer points of connection (and thus, failure) to deal with. Fewer cables, fewer power supply cords, etc. In contrast, each individual pedal needs to be properly connected and powered. That means if something goes bad in your board, you have an investigation to mount as to which cable or pedal it is.

And of course, all those cables means more setup & breakdown time.
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#14
Quote by ktullu98
Thats actually an idea I did not think of. I keep my sounds fairly simple, but just spend too much time figuring out the right distortion sound or whatever and there are just a few pedals I was thinking of getting.

WOuld it be wise to use the GT-10 EQ as well or just get an EQ pedal?


if you feel you need further eq than your amp can provide or want to say change the eq to a greater degree for say leads then sure why not. an individual pedal wouldn't likely do any better.

multi-fx aren't plug and play so take some time to experiment to see what works best.
#15
Individual pedals all the way. Here's the way I see it:

If you had a guitar permanently attached to a combo amp with built in effects, it's unlikely you'd be completely happy with it. If you can pick and choose your own guitar and amp, you'd be a bit more satisfied. If you seperate the amp into head and cab, you can find what cab/head combo works best for you. If you can hand-pick every effect, you're more likely to be satisfied with the sound. The more you break your rig into pieces to swap out and experiment with (right down to cables, speakers, power supplies, picks, strings, etc.), the more likely you are to get what you're looking for. Not to mention mods (!)

On the other hand, multi-fx units are getting better every day and they're at a pretty impressive state already. I've still got my old Zoom G1X kicking around somewhere, and that was what got me interested in effects in the first place. I thought the distortion was pretty good, though I was young, and haven't touched it in years.
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#16
Multi-FX boards are so much more convenient. Less setting up, less points for failure (less power supplies, cables, etc to deal with and troubleshoot), and more importantly more flexible patch switching.

The last one is doable with individual pedals... if you get more pedals (line selectors and the like or fancy MIDI stuff) to do it for you. Otherwise you need to be an octopus to switch chorus, compressor, and your one delay off and boost, flanger, and your other delay on at the same time.

The other thing is redundancy of individual pedal types. If you want to use three different delays in one song, you need either a multi-delay pedal or three individual delay pedals. And then maybe you need two reverbs and so on. It's a major pain.

I'm also not sure about the complaint about not being able to find Mult-FX boards with everything you like. There are like 100 different boards out there. People can't find one that does enough effects that they like to justify it? Also as people have mentioned, it's not like using Multi-FX units and single pedals is an either-or deal. You can mix and match and get that one pedal that you absolutely need in your chain.

Besides, at the end of the day, effects are a lot of hairsplitting and the other 99 people in the room at your next gave will probably not notice the difference between Chorus 1 and Chorus 2. Heck, 90 of them won't even be aware that you are using chorus.
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#17
Quote by theogonia777
Besides, at the end of the day, effects are a lot of hairsplitting and the other 99 people in the room at your next gave will probably not notice the difference between Chorus 1 and Chorus 2. Heck, 90 of them won't even be aware that you are using chorus.

True, and for someone gigging regularly that's probably what it comes down to, but I think for a lot of us we buy expensive gear for ourselves and not for the other 99 people in the room. The other 99 people in the room probably wouldn't mind me using the Epiphone and Marshall MG30 I sold last year.
#18
In my opinion, multi effects are the answer, as I've found that single pedals weren't versatile enough for me in that I'd sometimes need two different sounds from the same pedal during one song. Everything else was evenly matched for me, but a rig with multiple effects chains containing different units of the same pedal seemed less appropriate to me than just having a multi. And as far as sound quality, if you get your hands on a flagship like the Boss GT-100 or Zoom G9.2tt, I don't think it's an issue at all.
The above post is in terms of 'YMMV' and 'IMO', etc...

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#19
Quote by timbit2006
Individual pedals allow for 100% tonal customization, where with a multi-effects pedal you're stuck with whatever sounds the multi-effects can make.
What? There are usually more parameters that can be adjusted on a MFX than on a pedal. You don't have to use the factory presets you know? I don't use any factory presets on my GT-100.
But that aside, I use a Timmy for my overdrive because the overdrives in the GT-100 are crap.
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#20
I'm also not sure about the complaint about not being able to find Mult-FX boards with everything you like. There are like 100 different boards out there. People can't find one that does enough effects that they like to justify it? Also as people have mentioned, it's not like using Multi-FX units and single pedals is an either-or deal. You can mix and match and get that one pedal that you absolutely need in your chain.


Well, I own a half dozen or so MFX devices from 4 different companies, and not a single one has been 100% satisfactory on the tone front. Each one has strengths and weaknesses. And that is true even between devices by the same company.

Which is not to say that I haven't been happy with my purchases. Each and every one gets used on a fairly regular basis. Some I have even used to destruction and replaced with identical models.
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Last edited by dannyalcatraz at May 25, 2016,
#21
Quote by timbit2006
Individual pedals allow for 100% tonal customization, where with a multi-effects pedal you're stuck with whatever sounds the multi-effects can make.
I really think you meant that you cannot "swap in/out" the built-in effects simulations other than what is built-in. A few people are confused here.
#22
I started out with an ME-50 as the first effects I ever got. I loved it and used it for a long time. It was great for me to learn what all the different types of effects sound like. Over time I got to the point where my preset buttons were clean with a little chorus, distortion, and a lead distortion with a little delay. Then I got an amp that had a good distortion on its own, realized I didn't need all that crap and put together a simple pedal board with a wah, eq, chorus, delay, and room for my amp switch. Sold the ME-50 to a friend. He still uses it and gets great sounds out of it.

Having a shitload of crazy effects and changing a bunch of stuff throughout a song just isn't my thing. I set my chorus and delay to be fairly subtle and not tied to the tempo, though I do adjust the delay rate a little, set my eq to just boost the mids and volume a bit for leads. I've got a wah on my board, but I never use it except occasionally when I'm just screwing around. I'm happy with my amp's distortion and it's got two different gain channels as well as the clean so I have no need for an OD. I can have one set for a little dirt and the other set to full on distortion. Even when playing metal I don't go for that super saturated extremely high gain sound.

I just use my effects loop switch if I need to turn on multiple pedals at the same time, like the delay and eq, so I can turn them both on while I'm playing the preceding section, then when I'm ready hit the effects loop switch. My effects loop switch is also right next to the channel switcher, so if I'm going from like a clean chorus to a straight distortion or anything like that I can hit them at the same time.

In general I like my effects to just be a subtle texture change, not what the song is written around, so I have no need for a multi effects unit. Just down to personal stylistic choices, not bashing anybody that likes to have tons of effects.


If you get a pedal board, velcro them down, and leave them plugged in all the time all you have to do is plug in the guitar, amp, and power supply. No need to break the whole thing down every time.
#23
i prefer individual pedals. HOWEVER, i don't use a lot of effects often. my pedals both have eight or nine pedals on them, three or four OD/fuzzes, and the rest being mod, delay, or wah pedals. i never need to touch more than two at the same time. and you get used to it.

i have owned several MFX units (most recent was a HD500) and the older bean pod and an xd-live pod, and two korg units. it has gotten a lot better over the last decade (which is obvious).

one of the main reasons i don't like MFX units is because (as stated by somebody already) would be that they would be fine for the mod and delays, but their ODs are always terrible, and i would need standalone pedals anyway. i don't feel like using both.
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#24
I think that the MFX have gotten so much better recently. If you use individual pedals on a gig you are limited to your choice of pedals that night. If you use a MFX like my Digitech RP500 you have a choice of over 100 effects. There are 18 distortion/overdrives alone and emulations of everything from an Ibanez TS808 to a Boss DS-1, a Rat and so many others and they all sound pretty good. I am not just hyping the Digitech RP500 anymore than my Boss ME-50. They are both good and I'm sure Zoom and others do a great job also. If I go out with my regular individual pedal board, I have an Ibanez TS9, Ibanez TS10, a delay, a chorus and a wah and I can be quite happy with that combination knowing that it has limitations and it is what it is because that's what I chose to use.

I think the key to enjoying a good MFX is putting in the time needed to program them in a way that lets you move easily from one setting to another. There is no getting around the fact that in order to make a MFX work for you in a live situation it takes many hours of programming and occasionally going back and tweaking some of the patches you have already created. Patches that sounded great at home often don't work well on gigs. Lastly for me it has become a matter of floor space in the clubs that I play at and the extra set up and break down time with individual pedals.

Although I stick pretty much with the basics in my patches, for others MFX units may also introduce players to effects they might have never thought of using like compressors, flangers, noise gates, ring modulators, pitch shifters, envelope filters etc.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at May 26, 2016,
#25
Quote by timbit2006
How?
With a multi-FX you're limited to whatever the unit has programmed or built into it, yeah of course you can change the parameters of the effect in a multi-fx, but what if you can't really get the sound you want?
With pedals you could just swap that individual pedal out.


I've got literally bins of pedals that I've bought, used, abandoned and, in some cases, even RE-bought (discovered the same pedal in one of the bins).

The question is one of *what* you use most and *how* you use them. I can't get *exactly* that same sound I get out of my favorite Wampler with the modelers, but I can tweak it sufficiently in the editing software that it's close. So you're right that it's easier just to go and buy the pedal and add it to the board.

The thing that pulled me to modelers/multiFX was that I could change an entire pedalboard setup with a single stomp. And by change, I don't just mean turn some on and some off. I can do something as subtle as changing the settings on a single pedal from one stomp to another. I can store an entire set list worth of pedal board options and simply cycle through them live. And while a half-dozen pedals will usually do most folks on a pedal board, it's nice to have the options available in a multi-FX. And by the time you BUY those half-dozen pedals, you've usually spent at least what that multi-FX will cost you.

There's also the business of multiple points of failure. With a half-dozen pedals you have a dozen connectors on the pedals, a dozen connectors to chain them together, a lot of wiring, a power supply with teensy diameter wire running to the pedals (more connectors).
Lots of things to go wrong. Most folks buy a couple of good guitar cables to run from guitar to pedal board and from pedal board to amp, but the little connecting cords are junk, likely grabbed in handfuls from one of those candy jars full of them that they have at guitar center counters.

On the other hand, if you're intimidated by the breadth of the editing software's options and would rather stay simple, or you need that one specific sound you can't find anywhere else, individual pedals may be your cuppa.
#26
I've been going back and forth through the years.

There are a few things on multifx unit (like the GT-10 I have) that are built in and you never have to worry about. Did I bring my tuner? Did I bring my noise gate? They're always there!

Besides these two I can do a gig with pretty much anything.

When I did more shows and an orchestra gig I have several pedalboards as needs arose.
For live work, for the most part, I can do it with the GT-10 in 4 cable mode and do all my switching and be able to personalize the effects as needed, so it seems as I am using single pedals.

I've found that fx pedals are best for a minimalist setup, say a wah, overdrive and delay are pretty much what I need these days (plus tuner and noise gates).

When recording, most of the time I go with pedals, unless there is a pedal that I don't have in my arsenal, then I reach for the multifx. I prefer to record my tube amps and real pedals, they sound better. In live situation, I've found that the noise and mess of pedals usually detracts from my performance and signal loss is actually less with a multifx. I still refuse to use multifx for distortion sounds, especially high gain, they just sound pretty bad to me.
Last edited by diabolical at May 26, 2016,
#27
Quote by dspellman
On the other hand, if you're intimidated by the breadth of the editing software's options and would rather stay simple, or you need that one specific sound you can't find anywhere else, individual pedals may be your cuppa.

Yeah, this is sort of where it's at for me, there's a few reasons I go for individual pedals:
First is cost; I've spent a lot on pedals but at no single point have I had enough money to buy a multi-FX that could comfortably compete with them.
Second is compensating.
Third is the way I go about choosing them, which is essentially about simplicity. What I've always done is consider what I lack and look for the best pedal (within my budget) that will fill that niche. Essentially that means I end up having little searching to do to find the sounds I want, and in the end I have an array of very nice and identifiable sounds (and a ring modulator for some reason), which I can dial in as I like with minimal thought. That's great for me, since I have a pretty mediocre ear and I'm not terribly smart.
#29
I owned a multi-fx for years, they provide a great introduction to fx in general. That being said, the tone on the cheaper units can sometimes be a problem, even degrading your signal when not engaged . With an amp like a Mesa dual rec roadster, you'd be crazy to run any cheap fx in your chain, whether multi-fx or individual pedals - you don't want any tone-suck when you have a great amp. I'm not saying every low cost pedal does this, but you need to watch out for it.

It all depends on what you want to do. If all you need is delay , chorus and distortion, then individual pedals makes more sense. You already have a great amp with great reverb and distortion.

I personally have a bit of a hybrid board that consists of an Eventide TimeFactor delay ( which can store presets, has a tap tempo and can actually function as a chorus, flanger or auto-wah if you set it right) and a fuzz and two drive pedals. For fuzz and overdrive you definitely want individual pedals - those are the main weaknesses of any multi-fx.

The only reason I would consider buying a multi-fx would be if my gig required bouncing quickly from drastically different tones, such as a tremolo clean flange tone to a vibrato-laden delay filled distortion etc. Those types of complex tone leaps require a multi-fx, which is why Dream Theater, Vai and others with a lot of fx tend to use Axe FX multi-FX live, or similar products.
Last edited by reverb66 at May 27, 2016,
#30
The reason I actually switched to multifx in the first place was that I had to start singing in my band. I actually got into it kinda late into my career as I've always found that the guys with multifx sounded worse that the guys with individual pedals.

Now, there were some bands that I really liked that did amazing stuff with multifx, for example, saw Piggy from Voivod (RIP) arrive with a crappy beatup DOD multifx, or maybe late 80s Digitech, it was modified and had a "Dodge" logo so you couldn't tell. He somehow dialed in to sound fantastic and that was the "secret" Voivod sound.

Anyway...for me got to the point where I had to switch so much - patch pedal change for lead, press on delay, patch change for clean, press noise gate out, press on chorus....that when singing it became almost impossible.

So I simplified for a while with only noise gate and delay pedal but my sound suffered so that's the point where the Boss GT-10 came into my setup. I have to say that thanks to working with a digital mixer board I knew what to expect from the Boss GT-10.

If it had come in earlier I would've been lost like a lot of people are on this forum...Once I learned how to do pretty much everything with it as it is a very flexible and programmable/customizable piece of gear. You can pretty much do everything that you want to do with single effects and then a lot more. I couldn't get quite the same sound as with separate effects but with more care I managed to dial it in to actually even be better, but it was apparent from the start that it won't do for high gain tones so I integrated my digital analog Tech21 PSA-1 preamp into the setup and that fixed the problem.

I still can't stay away from analog preamp distortion and tube power amps, there is definitely something that even the most complex IR sampling hasn't been able to tap.
#31
Quote by diabolical
I've always found that the guys with multifx sounded worse that the guys with individual pedals.


I have found that to be the case as well, but I see it as a post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. I've noticed that the guys with multifx boxes (like me) are also playing low-end guitars, and are hobbyists who don't spend nearly enough time practicing. On the other hand, the guys with a boatload of individual pedals who sound really great tend to also have top-end (ie. expensive) guitars, amps, and other gear. They tend to be super serious to the point of actually making a living from playing, and practice for hours a day. The great sounding players I've encountered with a bunch of individual pedals also sound great playing an unamplified acoustic.

I am not a very good guitar player. I'm adequate for what I attempt. I don't have "professional" (ie. expensive) gear. I can tell the difference between good and bad sound, but my ear isn't discriminating enough to detect an audible difference between most distortion pedals. I can't listen to a recording and spot whether the lead guitarist is playing single coils or humbuckers, though I can tell in-tune versus off-key. I play at church through the PA system, and use a Zoom G1Xon to get just a little bit of variety in my sound.

Maybe if I was really talented, and incredibly skilled, and blessed with an ear that could detect minute differences in tone that most people would need an oscilloscope to recognize, and hit the lottery so money wasn't an object, I'd get a big pile of effects to go with my new ES-335 and Marshall stack. And if that description fits you, and you want to have an airline case full of individual pedals, more power to you! Obviously, you rock!

For me, I see how electronic devices have shrunk in size while increasing in capabilities over the years. I totally agree that back in the days of discrete transistors, different effects pedals were different from each other. One sound per stomp box made sense back in the 60's and 70's. That's the best the technology could manage. I also remember when a cell phone was the size of a brick and could only be used for phone calls. Times have changed, technology has improved. A cheap smartphone today is a phone, an address book, a web browser, a still camera, a camcorder with better picture than a $900 VHS camcorder from the early 80s, and an MP3 player that holds more music than a suitcase full of cassette tapes could. I suspect that same level of technological improvement also applies to guitar pedals.
#32
With guitar and studio gear, it is usually "the bigger, the better", in other words if you can build it with bigger electronic components it'll usually sound better. When I was el. engineering major, they had just started making a lot of these op amps, etc. into small chips. The designs of these were much cheaper as you could use a few and get the job done, but they never sounded better than ptp soldered amps or the big germanium fuzz boxes of yore. Now, this tech is mature, so it has improved, but if space and money weren't an issue I'd still be going old school.

We also forget another important factor - the guitar and the pickups. I recently managed to get an used Godin upgraded with boutique high eng pickups, and this thing sounds amazing and tube like through pretty much every modeler I've put it through.
#33
Quote by diabolical
With guitar and studio gear, it is usually "the bigger, the better", in other words if you can build it with bigger electronic components it'll usually sound better. When I was el. engineering major, they had just started making a lot of these op amps, etc. into small chips. The designs of these were much cheaper as you could use a few and get the job done, but they never sounded better than ptp soldered amps or the big germanium fuzz boxes of yore. Now, this tech is mature, so it has improved, but if space and money weren't an issue I'd still be going old school.

We also forget another important factor - the guitar and the pickups. I recently managed to get an used Godin upgraded with boutique high eng pickups, and this thing sounds amazing and tube like through pretty much every modeler I've put it through.


good point on the guitar/pickups thing. I've always relied more on the basics (ie guitar/amp) than a pile of fx. you have to have a solid base tone to work with and then the fx are more of an icing type thing for me. my setup is pretty simple but delivers a fair bit of variety. what it doesn't deliver is a wide range of complex tones that can be changed instantly which is what a mulit-fx unit can. my playing style and sound are built around the simple setup so for me pedals are probably always going to be the route I go.

multi-fx have come a long way. I still have my Digitech PDS 20/20 pedal which was considered the first multi-fx pedal back in the day (mid 80s). it did flange, chorus and up to a then amazing 2 seconds of delay. of course it could only do each effect separately and not all together. at the time though it was considered to be the shit though.
#34
Quote by monwobobbo
good point on the guitar/pickups thing. I've always relied more on the basics (ie guitar/amp) than a pile of fx. you have to have a solid base tone to work with and then the fx are more of an icing type thing for me.


In talking with better musicians, I've observed that those who specialize in playing original material or "uncovers" tend to concentrate on developing the best personal signature sound that they like and can use all the time. That strikes me as a good thing.

On the other hand, the players who specialize in making a living in a really good cover band place much more reliance on lots of different effects to enable them to emulate the sounds of a wide variety of other guitarists. That also strikes me as a good thing.

Seems to me that the universe needs both kinds of musician.
#35
If you look at artists that you like play, you can see if they have effects boards in their equipment or if they just use pedals. It's probably a good indicator of what you should be looking at depending on what you want to sound like.
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#36
I use individual pedals but I didn't buy them all in one go. They've just accumulated throughout the years and I like how they sound. If I was playing live and I needed a ton of effects I would probably prefer a Multi-FX box though. It's less hassle and you can just save your sounds for future use. As people have said, most people won't notice if you're using an MFX or not and I would say a lot of effects you probably need aren't going to be used on every song so just having a patch you can switch to is super convenient.
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#37
Quote by gerdner
In talking with better musicians, I've observed that those who specialize in playing original material or "uncovers" tend to concentrate on developing the best personal signature sound that they like and can use all the time. That strikes me as a good thing.

On the other hand, the players who specialize in making a living in a really good cover band place much more reliance on lots of different effects to enable them to emulate the sounds of a wide variety of other guitarists. That also strikes me as a good thing.

Seems to me that the universe needs both kinds of musician.


I think you'll find that a good base tone (s) is still needed regardless of which side of the fence you are on. even the best cover bands (unless the guitar player is rich) usually have to learn to make compromises when trying to duplicate cover songs. now the multi-fx comes in handy for them more in terms of changing delay times or chorus needs etc moreso than trying to nail each guitar players tone exactly.

I have a 3 channel amp and setup a clean tone and 2 rhythm tones on the drive channels. I use an overdrive mainly for leads but at times for more umph in a rhythm if needed. between this and simple things like changing pickups and working the volume and tone controls on my guitar I can cover a lot of ground.

a good guitar player should learn to make the most out of the basics before worrying about a bunch of fx.
#38
Most of the local cover bands buy some big multiprocessor, like HD500 or GT-100 and program everything in there, even the song pedal moves. It works, although I can't say I am crazy about it. I did a few cover gigs with my GT-10 as the only tone option through power amp, I managed to get respectable sounds and closer to the original than I would've if I used an amp.