#1
I just recently found out about these guitars and I was wondering what people who owned them thought. They certainly look nice
#3
Not me
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#4
I am wondering the same thing! All the Chapman videos say their awesome
'16 Gibson LP Standard T, '95 Fender MIM Strat
Helix Rack, Jetcity JCA50H w/ JCA24s+
#5
The only thing I've purchased of Chapman's advertising hoard are his sig Gravity Picks, and grudgingly. My favorite Gravity Pick is a 2mm Razer Standard, but unless you customize it, it's a six-buck pick in clear light blue. Easily lost (none gone so far, knock on wood). It turns out that Chapman likes (whodathunk?) the Gravity 2mm Razer Standard, and whatever deal he's wrung with Chris at Gravity has them with a surface and a color that I like better than how they normally come (custom order stuff, normally) and they're the same price exactly as what I pay for the whereditgo clear blue ones. So at the detriment of lining his pocket, I put in an order for the picks. I see it more as support for the California guy who makes them.

I've picked up the Chappers guitars at NAMM this past Winter and they seem to be good, if derivative, guitars, with no glaring glitches. We don't see them in LA and there's a glut of really *really* good guitars available at his price point, so it's going to be rare that there will be experiential notes coming from this part of this country.
Last edited by dspellman at May 26, 2016,
#6
I think I recall a few people here having ML-1s but they might not post here anymore.
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#7
To the rescue! I've got an ML-3 Modern, and without getting into every detail and specific possible, you'll be hard-pressed to find a competitor in the <$1,000 range. I've got guitars that cost between 500 and 1800, and this competes with all of them. The only issues, if they align with your preferences, that I found are that the pickups can be really polarizing and you'll like or hate them, and the pickup cavities are pretty shallow for swapping pickups, so you'll have to drill out or have drilled out not the whole cavity, but just the bits where the feet of the pickup bracket go. Or, if you're like me, you'll just bolt them right onto the body without the springs and it'll work fine for your tastes. But while that's something to be aware of, I highly, HIGHLY recommend the guitars from my experience with them. The price is affordable, and the amount of quality you get for it is ridiculous. It's ended up as my go-to guitar once I put some Duncans in it, and it's just overall great. If you've got any questions, feel free to reply here and I'll get back at you

“We’re built of contradictions, all of us. It’s those opposing forces that give us strength, like an arch, each block pressing the next. Give me a man whose parts are all aligned in agreement and I’ll show you madness. We walk a narrow path, insanity to each side. A man without contradictions to balance him will soon veer off.”



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#8
No stockists less than 400 miles from me. I'd like to have a go, but the issue of returns does concern me if I hate it.
#9
Quote by slapsymcdougal
No stockists less than 400 miles from me. I'd like to have a go, but the issue of returns does concern me if I hate it.

I was in the same boat. Ordered mine from halfway across the US. Their QC is top notch, but having been burnt several times by other companies, I definitely understand your concerns there.

If you're in the states, Riff City Guitars will do right by you, even on returns and replacements. They're pretty spectacular.

“We’re built of contradictions, all of us. It’s those opposing forces that give us strength, like an arch, each block pressing the next. Give me a man whose parts are all aligned in agreement and I’ll show you madness. We walk a narrow path, insanity to each side. A man without contradictions to balance him will soon veer off.”



silentfall.bandcamp.com
#11
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opW22GAG-bk
One of the guitars was a Cap10 and they said it felt like how much it costs. The owner said more expensive guitars felt more expensive and the cheaper ones felt cheaper. I would take his word on it. If he doesn't think his guitars are better than more expensive guitars on the market, then they probably aren't. If you like them and they're in the price range that you were looking in, you can't really go wrong if you like them. But if you're hoping for an amazing value where you get a much higher quality guitar for a cheaper price, you're not going to find it.
#12
I like the idea that is has the superstrat look and feel but more commonly is hardtailed or string thru (something I wish Jackson and Ibanez would do more of) but as everyone has pointed out I've never seen one in person let alone know anyone who owns one...
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#13
I like the original idea behind Chapman guitars of building guitars of great basic quality but not bothering too much about pickups as so many people change them anyway. There are even models in the range that I would be interested in but it's a very competitive market out there. At first I was really interested in an ML-1 as an HSS Strat alternative but the mahogany wood put me off as the whole point of a Strat, for me, is that it's alder and besides which, at £449 it was essentially the same price as the MiM Fender I actually bought. No contest for me. Next up I was looking for an HH guitar with a Floyd Rose so the ML-1 Norseman caught my eye at £649 and that's not a bad price but a PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 comes in at £799 and will hold a LOT more of its value. Furthermore, at the time I bought my PRS, the 'Floyd' model could be had for just £575 - no brainer! That essentially leaves the ML-2 at £519 but again, a Gibson Les Paul Studio or Tribute model can be had for under £700 and will hold significantly more of its value. No, I may like the idea behind Chapman guitars and I'm sure they're good but I strongly feel that the MiM Fender Strat, Gibson Les Paul Studio and PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 I ended up with all constitute better long term buys than the Chapman equivalents.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#14
Quote by Doadman
I like the original idea behind Chapman guitars of building guitars of great basic quality but not bothering too much about pickups as so many people change them anyway. There are even models in the range that I would be interested in but it's a very competitive market out there. At first I was really interested in an ML-1 as an HSS Strat alternative but the mahogany wood put me off as the whole point of a Strat, for me, is that it's alder and besides which, at £449 it was essentially the same price as the MiM Fender I actually bought. No contest for me. Next up I was looking for an HH guitar with a Floyd Rose so the ML-1 Norseman caught my eye at £649 and that's not a bad price but a PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 comes in at £799 and will hold a LOT more of its value. Furthermore, at the time I bought my PRS, the 'Floyd' model could be had for just £575 - no brainer! That essentially leaves the ML-2 at £519 but again, a Gibson Les Paul Studio or Tribute model can be had for under £700 and will hold significantly more of its value. No, I may like the idea behind Chapman guitars and I'm sure they're good but I strongly feel that the MiM Fender Strat, Gibson Les Paul Studio and PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 I ended up with all constitute better long term buys than the Chapman equivalents.
If your long term plans involve selling them eventually, sure.
I've never bought a guitar with the thought of having to sell it later.

Also, with regards to the ML-2, it's built more as a shredder's guitar(sculpted heel, 24 frets), so I wouldn't have said they occupy the same market space as a Studio or Tribute.
#15
I've always liked the look of the Tele shaped one they do.Would like to try one some day.
#16
Yeah, I never bought mine with a view of selling it later but over the years I've discovered that the probability is that I will change things around as the GAS attacks. The resale value wouldn't affect my choice if there were no alternatives but when there are alternatives, I now at least consider it. This was brought home to me a few years ago when the time came to sell a beautiful Jackson Soloist that had cost me about £1000 new but to my horror I discovered it had not only dropped like a stone in terms of value but even at such a low price, there were very few seriously interested buyers. In comparison, I've sold two PRS SE Custom 24 guitars and not only did they hold a strong percentage of their value but they were easily sold in 24-48 hours, such was the demand. When I bought my current PRS I was also considering a Jackson Pro Dinky and I loved them both. The neck and the stock pickups were better on the Jackson but the build quality, upper fret access and more conservative looks suited me better on the PRS. In many ways a tie but I went for the PRS because I knew that if the time ever came I wanted to sell, I'd get out of the PRS far more easily and get a lot more of my money back. I don't anticipate selling any of my guitars now but I know that if I do, they'll sell reasonably easily and give me a reasonable return and I don't feel I've compromised on any of them to do that.

With regards to the ML-2, I take your point to a degree, the markets aren't exactly the same but they're not miles apart either. No singlecut guitar, sculptured heel or not, is going to have fantastic upper fret access anyway. I didn't find the ML-2 to be that much better than the Gibson for upper fret access in the real world and a guitar I expected to have better upper fret access (LTD EC-1000) I found to be worse. I always used to go for 'shreddy' guitars due to the upper fret access and speed of the neck but I've found that in the real world it makes no practical difference to me. I VERY rarely use the extra frets and at the speed I can play, I'm pretty much as fast on the Gibson as I am on the PRS. There's a difference but it's nothing like as much as I thought. A mate of mine, who is probably the fastest guitarist I've ever seen, tells me that for some reason he feels he's faster on his Stratocaster than he is on his Ibanez! Horses for courses I suppose.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#17
I've been cosidering getting a ghostfret. All the others are not really interesting to me, since they are either ugly, or you can get a similar guitar for same price from every company ever. But the ghostfret, maaaaan. I love the explorer shape, but i kinda hate flat bodies. So a carved top explorer shape is great, and it also isnt either as pointy as the esp's or had a ridicolus headstock like deans have. I just hope i can find one to try out somewhere near me.
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#18
I have an original, Chinese ML-1. Which isn't really an indication of the current stock of guitars, but I really like it, for the price I paid for it, it's a great guitar.
Vintage V-100, EMG 81&60
Chapman ML-1

Jet City JCA20H