#1
Hi,

My guitar sound really stable and warm when using neck pickup but with the bridge pickup, It sound unstable even it sound heavier than the neck pickup.

What is wrong with this? Even on solo, neck pickup does sound better than the bridge.
Also the neck pickup has more attack than the bridge. Is there something wrong with the action or something else?

My guitar is Yamaha.
#2
Well, neck pickups sound warmer than bridge pickups because of their placement. Bridge pickup is closer to the bridge which gives you a brighter tone.

You could of course experiment with pickup height.

Your amp also has a big impact on your tone. If your amp has a harsh tone, using the bridge pickup makes it sound even harsher. Tweak your amp settings and maybe turn down the treble.

But yeah, neck pickups are supposed to sound warmer. That's just how it is. It's all about pickup placement. The closer to the bridge you place a pickup, the brighter it will sound.


What kind of Yamaha do you have? (I mean, if it's a Pacifica, you most likely have humbucker in the bridge and single coil in the neck and maybe you just prefer the sound of single coils.)
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#4
Quote by MaggaraMarine

What kind of Yamaha do you have? (I mean, if it's a Pacifica, you most likely have humbucker in the bridge and single coil in the neck and maybe you just prefer the sound of single coils.)


I don't know it exact name but it's Yamaha with Les Paul body type.
#5
Quote by korinaflyingv
You probably just prefer the sound of neck pickups, I do too. Also as Maggara said could be your amp. In my experience neck pickups are way more forgiving. I have a pretty decent amp and good pickups and I still often don't like the sound my bridge pickup makes. I need a new amp.

I'm trying to play some heavy metal and doesn't give me a pleasant sound.
#6
Quote by sosxradar
I don't know it exact name but it's Yamaha with Les Paul body type.

Yamaha doesn't make a Les Paul body guitar - is it one of these? http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical-instruments/guitars-basses/el-guitars/

Bridge pickups can definitely sound harsh, especially when you're playing by yourself. But when you're in a band or recording, you need the extra treble to cut through the noise.

You can also adjust the EQ on your amp or the tone on your pedals to get a more pleasant sound.
#7
I'd guess it's an AES 620, always liked the styling on those.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#8
The neck pick up will always sound 'warmer' or 'creamier' than the bridge. You can even increase that warmth of tone by playing closer towards the fretboard (like hovering over the 21/22 frets).

Also:

Neck pick-ups can quite often be used for metal rhythm tones, their additional 'fatness' of tone can give that additional push if needed. However the bridge is more commonly used, largely because it's louder and more aggressive.

I imagine how you've set the amp EQ is the issue. You'll push the mids/treble/highs if you're on the neck pick-up to get the clarity of notes because of its deeper bass response. On the bridge pick up you'll typically dip the mids/treble/highs because of its better treble response. But for the most part you'll just want a happy medium.

Don't forget you have tone control knobs on your guitar, they dial back the treble/mids/highs - and can also reintroduce them. Experienced players with two tone and two volume knobs often have one pick-up set for a lower volume rhythm tone and the other for a louder lead tone.

For reference:

The neck pick-up should typically sound creamier or warmer. The bridge pick up should sound harsher than that, but not to the point of hurting your ears. If it is piercing then dial back the highs and maybe pull back of the mids/treble.

In audio production this is call a high frequency pass, which is typically used to take out that top end poke
You Dont Know Me

I have 10 Anarchy Points - I also have 8 Mythology points!

Peavey Generation EXP Custom White
Yamaha 120S Black
Korg AX5G
Digitech Whammy
Zvex Fuzz Factory
Boss OS2

Quote by mrfinkle213
This man has brains.

Quote by CoreysMonster
Banned for indirect reference.
#9
Quote by sosxradar
I'm trying to play some heavy metal and doesn't give me a pleasant sound.
It's probably not the PU then. Maybe your amp, or the FX you're using. (are you using enough distortion? That pretty much cancels out most of the timbral differences between PUs.)
#10
what do you mean by "unstable"? the bridge pickup could be microphonic (squeal with a lot of distortion), but it's possible you mean something totally different.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
What you're describing is mostly down to the inherent qualities of where the pickup is placed, the tone closer to the neck is warmer, more bass-y. The bridge pickup sits right under where the strings become more tense, giving a brighter, more treble-y tone. I tend to play rhythm on the bridge pick up to help counteract any muddiness that comes with accentuating the bass end of things when playing chords, and use the neck pick up when playing lead in the upper octave of the instrument to counteract the harsh, ear-piercing qualities that I find the bridge pick up often accentuates in such situations.
#12
@cdgraves There's actually a vintage Yamaha les paul. I bought it off the store about 2 year ago. I have no clue if it a good guitar because that time I was still a beginner but now I can tell that it's a decent guitar there a problem with buzzing at 1 fret on 6 string.
@steven seagull
Not that one. Mine is a vintage guitar. Pretty old (20 years I guess) but sound amazing.
@Anthony1991
My amp setting is Bass: 6, Mid:2, Treble: Max, Gain:Max

@jongtr I didn't use amp. I use Guitar Rig. I can get variety of sound I want. I also think that the software doens't do a great job. I also has Amplitube3 and it sound way better than guitar rig but It require ASIO4All which is not what I want when I need to use backing track from Youtube.

@Dave_Mc By unstable I mean it sound vibrate and has some tremolo to it. The neck pickup is stable because it's warm and has no tremolo effect but it's not harsh.

@deathofagod I also do the same but when playing power chord at higher fret with bridge pickup doesn't sound stable as playing with neck pickup at all.
#13
Could you post a sound sample of you playing on both the bridge and neck pickups so we can hear what you mean?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
Quote by sosxradar
@cdgraves There's actually a vintage Yamaha les paul. I bought it off the store about 2 year ago. I have no clue if it a good guitar because that time I was still a beginner but now I can tell that it's a decent guitar there a problem with buzzing at 1 fret on 6 string.


Ha! So there is - the SL380. Not even listed on their web site. Looks like it's supposed to be a good guitar, so I wouldn't assume there's anything wrong it. It could be that you just don't like the tone of those pickups.

However based on the description of your setup, I'd say you're getting poor tone because you're going through a soundcard instead of a decent amp. I'm not the software expert, but to my knowledge, there is no replacement for running a pre-amplified signal into the recording console (at least not for the general consumer).

Are you using any sort of pre-amp between the guitar and computer? You may just need to get an amp, if you want real guitar tone. Most amps over $100 have an output that you can plug into the computer for all your effects and recording and stuff. They also make pre-amp pedals with a couple of vacuum tubes in them, but I'm not sure those would give you the power boost you need for the software to sound good.
#15
^that and having the treble maxed out. Even on an actual amp I could see how having the treble maxed might sound somewhat ok on the neck pickup and make the bridge pickup sound like shit. I'd guess it's making the neck pickup sound closer to what a bridge pickup usually sounds like and the bridge like an icepick.

TS, try setting your bass, mids, and treble to halfway and see what the bridge sounds like, then when adjusting your EQ pay attention to what it's doing to both pickups. You should be able to balance it so that they both sound good, but in different ways. The bridge should have a nice crunchy, high-mid sound. The neck should have a warmer, smoother, low-mid sound. And try turning the gain down. I'm not familiar with what you're using, but it's a common beginner mistake to use way more gain/distortion/overdrive/whatever than you actually need. I know I used way too much during my first few years of playing.


For the buzz on the first fret you either need to raise the action a little bit on that string or adjust the truss rod, maybe both. If both the truss rod and the action are set up correctly and there are still problems then a fret leveling might be needed, which is a lot more difficult and I wouldn't recommend you try it without the experience unless you're willing to take the risk of having to get a pro to replace your frets if you botch it badly enough. It's possible that a fret leveling and crowning could be a good thing to do with the instrument being that old, depending on how much it was played before you got it, but if you want to do that I would really recommend you take it to a professional and wouldn't recommend it unless it's really necessary.

For a normal setup it's not too bad and you shouldn't be able to actually hurt anything if you're being careful and following directions to the letter. Here's a good article on how to do a full setup:

http://www.samash.com/opncms/opencms/samash/library/main/How_to_Set_Up_an_Electric_Guitar.html

If you keep using the same brand and gauge of strings and the same tuning you should really only have to do it once, but any time you make a change you should check your setup. It's pretty easy after you've done it a couple of times.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at May 31, 2016,
#16
Quote by sosxradar

@Anthony1991
My amp setting is Bass: 6, Mid:2, Treble: Max, Gain:Max

@jongtr I didn't use amp. I use Guitar Rig.


Mate, most of the creamy goodness of the guitar is in the mids, and you've turned them off. Then you've added lots of treble, and heaps of solid state gain which brings more treble. My bet is that your tone is very trebly. And then you flick to the bridge pickup for even more treble and wonder why it's harsh sounding

Considering you are using an LP type guitar, try:
Bass: 4 (guitar has enough bass)
Mid: 5
Treble: 6
Gain: 5

See what that sounds like.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#17
You need to set the amp and your pedals so that there is a decent balance between the pickups when switching. If you're using Guitar Rig, then flatten out the eq settings and if that doesn't work, use a different amp model. That, or simply have two different Guitar Rig patches, one for each pickup.

You should never have any EQ setting at 10 on an amp sim ( or amp) as a general rule.
#18
yeah i think 4th and alan are likely to be on the money there- you have the tone settings very bright and scooped, which might sound good with the (warmer) neck pickup but which are likely to sound way too shrill with the bridge.

also if you could post a clip like MM said, that'd let us know for sure what the problem is.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#19
Quote by sosxradar
By unstable I mean it sound vibrate and has some tremolo to it. The neck pickup is stable because it's warm and has no tremolo effect but it's not harsh.
As well as what the others say about the settings you have, what happens with high gain, high treble, and the bridge PU is that the shortcomings of our western tuning system of "equal temperament" are laid bare. It's not evident on single notes, but as soon as you play chords - or even just two strings together - you may get nasty clashing effects, which you could describe as "tremelo", because the frequency clashes combine to create other virtual frequencies, known technically as "beats" (the phenomenon between two notes tuned very nearly the same which tells us they're out of tune).

The reason is that high treble combined with gain enhances all the upper overtones (harmonics) of the notes. Every note in a chord has its own harmonic series (multiples of the main frequency, forming higher notes), and when the intonation is "pure", so the frequencies of the different notes are in simple ratios with each other, then harmonics are shared and the chord blends. But equal temperament forces all half-steps to be exactly the same, which puts those frequency ratios out of true. Normally - on acoustic instruments or undistorted sounds - we don't notice the discrepancies because the clashing overtones are too faint, maybe just a slight coloration of the sound.
But as soon as we compress the wave (which distortion does), the quieter components of the notes - the overtones - get proportionally louder. And the more we turn the treble up - and use the bridge PU - the more clearly we hear all those upper frequencies; and the more risk of encountering those out of tune harmonics.

You will notice it most when playing a full major chord, because it's the overtones of the 3rd that are most out of tune with overtones of the root. That's one reason why rock guitarists use power chords. The root and 5th are much less out of tune with each other than the 3rd is.

This may not be your issue. But I hope you enjoyed reading it anyway!