#1
Hi,

I just heard this song called "Still Got The Blues" for the first time and I decide to pick guitar up, search for backing track and start jamming. I just solo the whole song with my melody that came out of nowhere. I'm feeling so good right now with what I've done I wish I've recorded all that solo I've play.

I don't even know any scale at all beside remember the note that I remember from other song.

Is it a problem in the future if I don't know any note I'm playing in and can't read music at all?
Last edited by sosxradar at May 30, 2016,
#2
You're playing by ear. Wes Montgomery also played by ear and he's one of the greatest ever. So no it's not a problem.

No need to force yourself to learn theory if you don't want to.
#3
Just makes communicating harder.
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lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
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you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#4
Quote by sosxradar
Hi,

I just heard this song called "Still Got The Blues" for the first time and I decide to pick guitar up, search for backing track and start jamming. I just solo the whole song with my melody that came out of nowhere. I'm feeling so good right now with what I've done I wish I've recorded all that solo I've play.

I don't even know any scale at all beside remember the note that I remember from other song.

Is it a problem in the future if I don't know any note I'm playing in and can't read music at all?
Not if your ear is good. And not if you don't have to discuss what you're doing with other musicians....

But it's a good idea (next time) to record yourself and listen back, to check it was as good as you thought it was when you were playing. Hear any bad notes? Can you work out why they were bad (ie how to avoid them next time)? That's where a little theory knowledge can help - although mainly it's about knowing your chords as well as you know your scales, and that can be all fretboard knowledge (patterns and shapes); the names of things are less important. Unless, as I say, you want to talk about it with other musicians. Or ask advice on web forums.... ;-)
#5
Quote by sosxradar
Hi,

I just heard this song called "Still Got The Blues" for the first time and I decide to pick guitar up, search for backing track and start jamming. I just solo the whole song with my melody that came out of nowhere. I'm feeling so good right now with what I've done I wish I've recorded all that solo I've play.

I don't even know any scale at all beside remember the note that I remember from other song.

Is it a problem in the future if I don't know any note I'm playing in and can't read music at all?


It's not a problem per se, but eventually you will start to notice patterns you tend to use a lot, and then someone might say to you "hey that's the pentatonic scale" and then you might discover the major scale in much the same way also, and you could have just practiced that right away, and been faster, and had a larger variety of options at your fingertips much sooner.

Reading music is less of an issue. It's always helpful, but is only really necessary in certain situations.

Basically, you can get by no problem. The music you make is the music you make, and if you're happy with that, then you're good to go.

But if you name and learn the shapes, you'll be more powerful, and you'll be able to express yourself more freely.

Theory wasn't devised mathematically. It was people just playing by ear stuff they liked the sound of, and they noticed important patterns that they named, and it evolved that way.

You can use things without naming them, but naming them is more powerful. Imagine if you never learned math. You'd be able to work out things that have to do with number, to some degree, like taking the right number of screws for the holes you need to screw. But if you just name the numbers, then you are much more powerful, and it is much easier.

"To name is to know" -Socrates.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at May 30, 2016,
#6
It is not a problem if you can find the notes you want to play without needing to guess (and can do that over any backing track).

But if you know theory and play something cool by ear, it's easier to figure out what you just played. That way you can also use similar kind of ideas in your other solos. And if you played something you don't like, it's easier to avoid that in the future if you know what it is (I mean, how it relates to the backing track).

Knowing at least some basics of theory (intervals, keys, chord functions, rhythm) would be recommended. Obviously having a good ear is always important but theory knowledge will also support your ear. Naming things just makes it easier to remember them.
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Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#7
I agree with much of the above but remember that music is like a language. If you want to communicate with other people (like play in a band) you need a common form of communication. You hear a lot of people say "I don't know any theory" when in reality they know "some" theory. If you know what key a song is in or if you know that the lead you are playing is based on a major or minor scale then you know "some" theory. That may be just enough to get you where you want to be and get you to the point where you can communicate with other musicians.
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