#1
Hello!

So I have decided to create a tentative list of the features I would like in a "perfect" guitar, and I have come upon a debate for the woods I want it to be made of, either Primavera/Mahogany or Swamp Ash (I know, two entirely different woods, and two significantly different tones). However, I can't decide which I like the tone of better. However, this post is just a hypothetical (which I may try later in life when I have several $100's burning a hole in my pocket) question, has anyone built a guitar with more than one type of wood? Not like a maple top, but like one wing mahogany and one wing ash? Assuming no issues arise from the glue, and that woods affect the tone (I know, it's a heated debate, but for argument's sake let's say it does). Would it sound like the better qualities of both woods, or the worse ones? Or would it just sound entirely different? I'm probably going to try it in the future anyways to find out, but I would like to see if anyone has already.
#2
Are you talking about a neckthrough when you are talking about wings?

There's going to be very little impact from the wings. Most neckthrough guitars have mutli-piece necks anyway.

If you're talking about something like an lp? I guess if you assume that wood makes that big of an impact then having two different woods would do something.

The bigger issue is that if you use two completely different woods in a left right configuration wouldn't one side of the guitar be heavier then then the other? That would be weird.
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#3
Like mentioned a neck-through is kind of like what you're talking about but I don't think there are many guitars that do something like that. There are a few one-shots that have done so:



But aside from that it seems like it's slim pickings. As for the benefits, that's really a YMMV thing because everybody has a different set of ears. For me, it seems like more of a cosmetic thing than a functional thing but I haven't tried anything like it so my opinion doesn't hold much weight.
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#4
I'm one to believe that people who consider that woods make a significant difference to tone to an amplified electric guitar are hearing with their eyes.

All that matters is that they look pretty and it wows the people who believe it makes a difference.
(hypothetically) Would it sound like the better qualities of both woods, or the worse ones?

It would sound like all the qualities of both and everything in between. Woods don't care if they sound good or bad.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at May 31, 2016,
#5
que the video where Paul Reed Smith talks about elements of an electric guitar being "subtractive" to it's tone.

i'm building a strat based on the fact that the two best "tonewoods" for it are swamp ash and korina.

not because of how they sound, because they don't weigh much. would have gone with a chambered basswood body, but i found a chambered ash body locally for cheap.

i think the woods matter more for tone in acoustics. but that's just me.
Last edited by gregs1020 at May 31, 2016,
#7
Yeah, for the most part, it's going to be aesthetic only. Like TOODEEP says, tonewoods affecting electrics is minimal at best.
Although I do have a korina wood explorer that seems very bright compared to my other guitars. It probably has more to do with the pickups than anything.
Acoustics I could see it making a bigger difference on.
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#8
Thanks everyone for the responses. I personally think it could look cool with the right pieces of wood, and if it really doesn't make that much of a tonal effect then I think I'm going to try it. My ears aren't that super-sensitive anyways, so what the heck, right?

There may be differences in weight, which I hadn't considered, but I think I could get used to it.

Also, I used the word "wing" because I don't know what the left and right sides of a set-neck guitar are called, because they are often separate (in at least two pieces). I also plan to have a stained red finish to show off the wood complement.

It will be a semi-hollowbody, with a piezo, so there might be something interesting there, but I mostly plan to use the magnetic pickups (Bareknuckles, nothing but the best for when I can afford it).
#9
Quote by Guitariano24
Thanks everyone for the responses. I personally think it could look cool with the right pieces of wood, and if it really doesn't make that much of a tonal effect then I think I'm going to try it. My ears aren't that super-sensitive anyways, so what the heck, right?

There may be differences in weight, which I hadn't considered, but I think I could get used to it.

Also, I used the word "wing" because I don't know what the left and right sides of a set-neck guitar are called, because they are often separate (in at least two pieces). I also plan to have a stained red finish to show off the wood complement.

It will be a semi-hollowbody, with a piezo, so there might be something interesting there, but I mostly plan to use the magnetic pickups (Bareknuckles, nothing but the best for when I can afford it).


wings are a term used for neck thru guitars. they are attached to the neck and in many cases are a different kind of wood than the neck.
#10
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Like mentioned a neck-through is kind of like what you're talking about but I don't think there are many guitars that do something like that. There are a few one-shots that have done so:



That looks kind of like a Danny Ferrington guitar I saw once, years ago. Do you know what it is in reality?
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#11
I suppose there are some differences that might appear. There's no way to predict anything, however; if the result is crap or a happy accident, there's no way to know until the guitar is completed. I have a Flying V that has a multipiece maple neck and mahogany wings with maple burl on top and bottom of each wing. Sounds great with the Tom Anderson pickups I have on it now. But it sounded horrible with the original set of SD Invaders.

Remember that with something like a neck-through LP, you have two very different wings. The treble wing will contain the control cavity and has a cutaway, while the bass side wing has only a switch and no cutaway. If you want to save a bit of weight, you can chamber that bass-side wing, and that will change things slightly.

Worse yet, there's no guarantee that any two guitars with the same wood combination will sound the same. Wood density within the same species varies significantly, and even if you carefully select and weigh each piece, there's no non-anecdotal way to know ahead of time what the finished guitar will sound like ahead of the build.
#12
Quote by Guitariano24
Thanks everyone for the responses. I personally think it could look cool with the right pieces of wood, and if it really doesn't make that much of a tonal effect then I think I'm going to try it. My ears aren't that super-sensitive anyways, so what the heck, right?

There may be differences in weight, which I hadn't considered, but I think I could get used to it.

Also, I used the word "wing" because I don't know what the left and right sides of a set-neck guitar are called, because they are often separate (in at least two pieces). I also plan to have a stained red finish to show off the wood complement.

It will be a semi-hollowbody, with a piezo, so there might be something interesting there, but I mostly plan to use the magnetic pickups (Bareknuckles, nothing but the best for when I can afford it).


Sounds very cool. We will need pictures.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#13
Quote by dannyalcatraz
That looks kind of like a Danny Ferrington guitar I saw once, years ago. Do you know what it is in reality?



Yeah its pretty sweet looking for sure


It's a Morris S-AMUM. It's a one off.
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My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


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I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#14
OP, it probably won't make a difference in most electric guitars, with the possible exception of a hollowbody or something with piezos. Here's why I think that:



And


And


All of those are made with dozens of pieces of wood. They sound great. (I own the first two.). But there isn't any indication the melange of woods is really making a difference in their tones.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#15
So I found out I can get a byog body with a mahogany/ash combination, in a shape that I like. That said, I've heard that their body woods aren't the best, but then again, I've never made a body from scratch before. Would I be better off finding some other way, building my own and using it as a learning experience I guess, or ordering the body from byog and staining it myself?
#16
Quote by Guitariano24
So I found out I can get a byog body with a mahogany/ash combination, in a shape that I like. That said, I've heard that their body woods aren't the best, but then again, I've never made a body from scratch before. Would I be better off finding some other way, building my own and using it as a learning experience I guess, or ordering the body from byog and staining it myself?


Neither.

It changes everything if you're going to "build your own" with no experience.
You might as well just toss "features I would like in a "perfect" guitar" out the window.
You're likely to be hard pressed to get to the end of the project with the bits and pieces intact.
#17
Pretty much what dspellman said. Unless you're already skilled with woodworking- and possibly even if you are- you're going to screw things up building your first guitar.

Best to try working with a kit first, IMHO.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#18
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Pretty much what dspellman said. Unless you're already skilled with woodworking- and possibly even if you are- you're going to screw things up building your first guitar.

Best to try working with a kit first, IMHO.


Fair enough.