#1
Hi I'm looking for a new guitar to buy and I don't know which one to choose a strat or a les Paul. The thing is I play blues and I like the strat's sharp sound and the way you can just attack the guitar like SRV did but I also wanna play hard/classic rock with a lot of fast legato lines that I just can't do on a strat and to me that's why the les Paul as a little advantage (also the les Paul tone is just awesome) I also hear that les Paul are easier to play but have worse upper fret access (is that true?) so what's your opinion?
#2
I forgot to mention that I'm also thinking of an epiphone les Paul standard plus top or a MIM fender standard stratocaster HSS so give me an opinion on that too
#3
If you want the best of both worlds, I suggest a good compromise may be a HSS strat with a humbucker in the bridge.

You can play any style of music on any guitar, its just that some guitars are a bit better suited for certain styles than others.
1. I also hear that les Paul are easier to play 2. but have worse upper fret access (is that true?)

1. That's an entirely subjective statement. As a general rule, LP's have thicker necks and a noticably flatter fretboard radius, which both significantly affect feel. In terms of comparing one to the other, the two guitars are almost completely different. 2. LP's generally do have worse fret access than Strats. The single cutaway instead of a double on a strat somewhat limits the reach of your thumb and many LP's have a thick body with a boxy neck heel that's uncomfortable on the upper registers. Strats have a boxy neck heel too but the two cutaways do make life marginally easier.

Ultimately they're far too different to compare one to the other directly. Going down to a guitar store and trying a variety of guitars of the two basic styles is by far the best way to know what you would prefer. So go do that.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jun 1, 2016,
#4
Good news/bad news: there are a LOT of guitar makers out there, and some of them make instruments- like Godin, Fret-King, Reverend- that fuse visual and tonal elements of both of those guitars and/or other models. Keep your eyes open and you might find one that suits you.

It may take time to research; it may require ordering over the Internet; you might have to buy used; it may cost more than your current budget. But options exist.
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#5
Hi thanks for the response but with a HSS strat I still have the problem that I can't shredd or play fast legato in it or at least as I would on a les Paul
#6
The ability to shred us more to do with the comfort the player has with a particular guitar design than the design itself. See Yngwie Malmsteen for Strat shredding examples.

So what you need to do is figure out what it is about LPs that facilitate your shredding, and what characteristics of Strats seem to hold you back. Is it neck profile? Scale length? Or is it a simple as more familiarity with one than the other?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jun 1, 2016,
#7
I have no idea why you wouldn't be able to play legato as-well on a strat. Strats tend to have thinner necks and taller frets. The arm access also allows for a more comfortable playing position in my opinion, I find the Les Paul design puts my wrist in a worse position necessitating me to use my elbow more. I'd pick a humbucker strat over a Les Paul for legato any day, at-least as far as playability goes.
Last edited by dragonzrmetal at Jun 1, 2016,
#8
Buy whichever one stands out to you. When you look at it and then pick it up it should speak to you.

I was always Anti LP for some reason, they just seemed bulky and rough compared to strats/teles. Then I bought a Epi LP plus top and I couldn't put the thing down. Now I mainly play a Gibson LP and play LP's exclusively.

My point, it all boils down to testing them out and determining what feels right in your hands. Both are amazing!
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#9
Lots of people shred on strats. I've had both LP's and strats and I can't say there was something I could play on one that I couldn't play on the other.

Like the others said, test them both out; buy whichever one feels best.
#10
You can shred on any guitar. And any guitar can handle whatever genre you throw at it, but as stated, some are better at certain styles than others.

Pick whatever feels the best to you! Personally, I love both strats AND LP's, for different reasons.
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#11
I have a LP and a strat. I love the LP because LP's are awesome but if I had to chose which was more comfortable to play, I'd say the strat. An HSS strat and the LP with coil tapping humbuckers are both versatile guitars that will accommodate a variety of styles.
#12
I don't know if it's my technique but when I play legato on a strat the sound just dies out after a few seconds.
#13
There are great examples of playing fast legato runs on both styles of guitars for Les Paul see Joe Bonamassa, for Strat I'd recommend Eric Johnson.

Good Luck!
#14
yeah an HSS or HSH superstrat (ideally with a more modern neck profile/radius/etc. to facilitate the shreddier stuff) would probably be the thing, as toodeepblue said.
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I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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#15
Quote by adelino316
I don't know if it's my technique but when I play legato on a strat the sound just dies out after a few seconds.

It's almost certainly your technique, but it won't help if your guitar sound doesn't have very much compression either.

As I've already said, you can play any style on any guitar. There's nothing to prevent you from doing so. And if you still don't think strats can ever be good shredding instruments, you only need look at Malmsteen to know that's BS. The truth is that it's all down to personal taste.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jun 1, 2016,
#16
what type of strat? people like to say stuff like "you can play anything on any guitar", but if I play the shreddy stuff on a vintage spec (tiny frets, 7.25" radius etc.) fender-style guitar with low output single coils (and yes I have guitars like that) i look silly pretty quickly. compared to when i play it on shred-style guitars, where I don't. (or at least not as much.) and before anyone says anything smart-alecky about the amp, i'm using shred-approved high gain amps as well.

it's definitely worth using the right tool for the job, especially if you know you're struggling when you're not using the right tool. I mean, you can technically run in any shoes but that doesn't mean that if you know you're going to be doing a lot of running that you shouldn't buy running shoes.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#18
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
If you want the best of both worlds, I suggest a good compromise may be a HSS strat with a humbucker in the bridge.

You can play any style of music on any guitar, its just that some guitars are a bit better suited for certain styles than others.

1. That's an entirely subjective statement. As a general rule, LP's have thicker necks and a noticably flatter fretboard radius, which both significantly affect feel. In terms of comparing one to the other, the two guitars are almost completely different. 2. LP's generally do have worse fret access than Strats. The single cutaway instead of a double on a strat somewhat limits the reach of your thumb and many LP's have a thick body with a boxy neck heel that's uncomfortable on the upper registers. Strats have a boxy neck heel too but the two cutaways do make life marginally easier.

Ultimately they're far too different to compare one to the other directly. Going down to a guitar store and trying a variety of guitars of the two basic styles is by far the best way to know what you would prefer. So go do that.


My issue with standard LPs is that the neck connects to the body at around the 16th fret, and the neck/body transition is notoriously clunky. That makes working with the upper frets less than comfortable. So I found LPs that don't have that problem. The black guitar is a Gibson Axcess Custom, the reddish one is an Agile semi-custom (you can buy an Agile AL-3200 with an Axcess-style neck heel and neck-through construction):



In addition, there are LPs (not from Gibson, sorry) that have 24-fret boards, 16" radius and jumbo frets, like this one: