#1
Hi,

Ive been playing for about 1 year and a half now and im mostly been practicing open/barred chords and bends for soloing etc.

Now im trying to learn the outro solo for november rain since that one has a couple of really fast parts.

Is there an exercise that you could recommend to help me practicing the speed of me playing this parts ?
#2
Try doing other, simpler stuff first I guess. There's a lot to that solo. What kind of 'fastness' are you trying to achieve?
I do not want to have a signature anymore.
#3
To play fast, you have to be really good at playing slow. Poke around for some scale warm ups and run those at various tempos, rhythms, and note values (quarter notes, 8th notes, triplets). Also work on playing those with hammers/pulls. Use a metronome and spend 15-30 minutes every day on warm up and technique before you get to the actual music.
#4
As above play slowly and accurately for as long and often as you can, building strength. Make sure the notes are ringing out clearly and other strings are muted. Takes a while so stick at it.
#5
Quote by RDSElite
Try doing other, simpler stuff first I guess. There's a lot to that solo. What kind of 'fastness' are you trying to achieve?


Well the "fastness" im trying to achieve is like in November Rain ( section 2 if you divide it ) where there is alot of legato and lots of hammer on and pull offs.
I know how to play it slow but its like when trying to speed it up im never getting anywhere close.
#6
Quote by cdgraves
To play fast, you have to be really good at playing slow. Poke around for some scale warm ups and run those at various tempos, rhythms, and note values (quarter notes, 8th notes, triplets). Also work on playing those with hammers/pulls. Use a metronome and spend 15-30 minutes every day on warm up and technique before you get to the actual music.


Is there any tabs out there that i can print out and exercise with?
Ive learned that if im gonna practice i have to have something infront of me, some pattern to learn or something like that.

I think im quite good at playing slow, i dont have any trouble going trough slow sections. Like November rain solo , that one is pretty slow imo and im nailing that one. But as soon as i try something with high speed its like my fingers dont do as i want them to
#7
TS, your legato will only ever be as fast as your weakest trill. I place my money on it that your weakest pair of fingers is your 3rd and 4th fingers. However fast you can trill with that pair will be your ultimate speed. But it must sound good as well. Good sound generation is king.
Last edited by mdc at Jun 2, 2016,
#8
Quote by mdc
TS, your legato will only ever be as fast as your weakest trill. I place my money on it that your weakest pair of fingers is your 3rd and 4th fingers. However fast you can trill with that pair will be your ultimate speed. But it must sound good as well. Good sound generation is king.


You have a point. Im pretty strong with every finger except my 4th since im almost never using that little pinky
#9
a much overlooked technique in playing at ANY speed is: don't lift a finger off the string until you HAVE to...now this takes intense practice and concentration to make it part of your "muscle memory"

speed is an obsession with many guitarists..for many reasons..ego is a main one..that aside..many play sloppy and out of tempo..but that does not seem to stop them-they persist perhaps thinking by osmosis they will eventually hit all the right notes with perfect technique..

the players who are noted for playing very fast had to go very slow to begin with..its like a law of physics..to go 100 MPH you have to go 5mp first...
play well

wolf
#10
Quote by wolflen
its like a law of physics..to go 100 MPH you have to go 5mp first...


tachyons man
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#11
A question , my goal with my guitar playing is to play the songs i like at home.
Not to play in a band or nothing like that.

Is the best way for me then just to practice that song over and over ?
As November Rain outro, should i keep on playing it over and over untill perfection or should i go over to some exercises that would later on help me in me playing the songs i like ?
#12
Quote by Killing Hand
As above play slowly and accurately for as long and often as you can, building strength. Make sure the notes are ringing out clearly and other strings are muted. Takes a while so stick at it.


It's not really strength ... it's about playing as tension-free as possible with minimum movements,
#13
Quote by nicklaspetrel
A question , my goal with my guitar playing is to play the songs i like at home.
Not to play in a band or nothing like that.

Is the best way for me then just to practice that song over and over ?
As November Rain outro, should i keep on playing it over and over untill perfection or should i go over to some exercises that would later on help me in me playing the songs i like ?


If that's what you want do, go for it ... but then the best thing is to buy software for slowing down and loopiing (like Transcribe by seventhstring), and find the loop you want, and run it as slow as Transcribe will take it, initially ... just pick out one or two bars, and get them accurate at that speed, with as little movement as possible ... one finger on a fret at one time ... the others hovering just above the frets ... but you'll need to learn how to control string noise. Experiment with how little pressure you need apply to fret a note ... you'll be amazed how little is needed ... many folk press down way too forcefully ... that wastes energy and slows you down. Similarly, on a pull-off, think "relax finger pressure", as opposed to "yank finger back in air tugging string". Back this up as needed with picking hand.

The biggest barrier is mental. Think "here comes a hard bit", and surprise ... you tense up and it is hard. It's all about relaxation and confidence ... all that comes from playing really slow with attention to miniscule detail on your movements and relaxation. Tension is not just in your fingers ... it can go through every muscle up to and including your neck and shoulders ... and interfere with your breathing (holding your breath) ... so eliminate any of that.

Good luck!
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jun 2, 2016,
#14
Quote by nicklaspetrel
Is there any tabs out there that i can print out and exercise with?
Ive learned that if im gonna practice i have to have something infront of me, some pattern to learn or something like that.

I think im quite good at playing slow, i dont have any trouble going trough slow sections. Like November rain solo , that one is pretty slow imo and im nailing that one. But as soon as i try something with high speed its like my fingers dont do as i want them to


My recommendation is always to learn scales by using the major scale pattern, and working them out on the fretboard itself. Reading scales will get you playing them sooner, but they won't stick around and start to feel natural. Since most melodic phrases fit into a clearly defined scale (or arpeggio), you really want to get those basic interval patterns under your fingers for good.

I mean you can look up "C major first position tab" and play it right away, but chances are you won't remember it tomorrow.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jun 2, 2016,
#15
Quote by nicklaspetrel
You have a point. Im pretty strong with every finger except my 4th since im almost never using that little pinky


That's why you think you are playing it well slow but, in truth, you aren't using the best technique (lack of pinky) and can get away with it at lower tempo's.
Keep that slow tempo for a while and start using that pinky. Once you get more comfortable then speed up a bit. Rinse and repeat.
#16
Quote by jerrykramskoy
It's not really strength ... it's about playing as tension-free as possible with minimum movements,


It's about building the strength in the hands and the fingers to enable playing with minimal movements. Tension free I agree with..
#17
Quote by wolflen
a much overlooked technique in playing at ANY speed is: don't lift a finger off the string until you HAVE to...now this takes intense practice and concentration to make it part of your "muscle memory"

Disagree completely. Really what you should be doing is relaxing any finger you're not using. Note that this is in no way the same as lifting at all; it's simply not fretting any more. Using the absolute minimum amount of energy and getting your muscles to do nothing at all. Admittedly that is much harder than it sounds, but it's what we should always be aiming for if we want perfect technique.

Quote by Killing Hand
It's about building the strength in the hands and the fingers to enable playing with minimal movements.

No, it really isn't. The vast majority of people will start off with all the strength they will ever need for playing guitar, playing with minimal movement is much more about learning to only use the strength you have when you need to and doing nothing more than that.


TS: the sad news is that the best way of getting really good at playing those parts is going to be to practice those parts. That's going to mean a lot of time playing them slowly and getting them as right as humanly possible before speeding up at all, it could take months, years, or longer. You'll have times when you want to give up and times when you feel like you're just not getting any better. But you can get there, if you put in the time and proper practice.

I'd seriously recommend having other things to learn at the same time so the monotony doesn't get to you, and you have other music that you can play properly in the mean time!

Good luck!
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#19
One finger fretting at any one time is invaluable for Allan Holdsworth legato playing, if that's what players are striving for. For the human species, regular pull-offs are best, which requires one finger to generate the volume, whilst another is responsible for pressing the string down on to the right fret.

For picked notes, I agree, the ideal is to have the fretting hand relaxed as possible.
Last edited by mdc at Jun 5, 2016,
#20
Quote by mdc
One finger fretting at any one time is invaluable for Allan Holdsworth legato playing, if that's what players are striving for. For the human species, regular pull-offs are best, which requires one finger to generate the volume, whilst another is responsible for pressing the string down on to the right fret.

For picked notes, I agree, the ideal is to have the fretting hand relaxed as possible.

Obviously I didn't quite communicate what I meant fully:

At no point did I say when you're not sounding that note, just when you're not using the finger any more. If that implies Holdsworthian Legato to you then I'm sorry for not making myself clearer!

What I mean is actually just that: stop using a finger when it's not needed any more. If you're pre-fretting for legato playing then that finger is still in use, and very definitely should still be fretted with.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#21
Similar technique is really useful for Nashville country style soloing, where you can basically barre a few strings of a scale position so you can let the notes ring, and then move to a different position. Really good practice for moving horizontally.