#1
Long time viewer, first time poster ... with what might seem a dumb question about constructing major chords.
Most sites etc seem to refer to the C major chord as an example. They say to number notes something like this -
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
C D E F G A B
then go on to explain that a major chord is made up of 1, 3, 5. So for C major C E G. Then a beginner guitar chord is used to illustrate X C E G C E to prove the point.

Most explanations then go into detail beyond what I want to understand at this stage.

But what I don't understand is beyond C and G.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
C D E F G A B beg chord X C E G C E (CEG )
A B C D E F G beg chord X A E A C# E (why not ACE ? ? )
G A B C D E F beg chord G B D G B G (GBD )
E F G A B C D beg chord E B E G# B E (why not EGB ? ? )
D E F G A B C beg chord X A D A D F# (why not DFA ? ? )

why do A, E & D majors include sharps(flats) instead of the full notes? i would like to understand before trying to understand more complicated chord formation.

thanks.
#2
Hey!

Long time viewer and first time poster here as well.

What kabadi.man said is on the mark.

Incidentally, I just recently created a worksheet that you can use to help you with this very thing, in addition to learning how you can make a major chord scale.

Check it out, along with the supplementary post:

Some Rad Guitarist’s Major Chord Scale Worksheet: Tertian Harmony

https://someradguitarist.wordpress.com/2016/06/03/some-rad-guitarists-major-chord-scale-worksheet-tertian-harmony/

Perhaps just focus on the major, minor, and diminished triads for now.
Last edited by somradguitarist at Jun 3, 2016,
#3
Quote by kabadi.man
The chord is comprises of the first, third and fifth note of any given scale.
the C Major scale has no sharps or flats, hence why a C major chord has no sharps or flats

the A major scale is A B C# D E F# G#
so an A major chord comprises of the first 3rd and 5th notes of the A major scale and is thus A C# E.

if you learn the C major scale shape starting on the A string 3rd fret, then move the whole shape up 2 frets. it now starts on D. thats the D major scale. pick the 1st 3rd and 5th notes of that scale, theres your D major chord. Slide the shape up another 2 frets, thats now an E major scale, pick the first 3rd and 5th, thats your E major chord.

In the early days, its all about scales and shapes.


Thanks for your quick response. I'll print out what you said and get fretting. Seems I misunderstood most the explanations I found on the web. Or they are written from the point of view of someone who already understands, but doesn't remember the confusion of not understanding.
#4
Quote by somradguitarist
Hey!

Long time viewer and first time poster here as well.

What kabadi.man said is on the mark.

Incidentally, I just recently created a worksheet that you can use to help you with this very thing, in addition to learning how you can make a major chord scale.

Check it out, along with the supplementary post:

Some Rad Guitarist’s Major Chord Scale Worksheet: Tertian Harmony

https://someradguitarist.wordpress.com/2016/06/03/some-rad-guitarists-major-chord-scale-worksheet-tertian-harmony/

Perhaps just focus on the major, minor, and diminished triads for now.


Thanks. At the moment your worksheet looks quite daunting. I've saved it in favourites and I'll have a look at your supplement

https://someradguitarist.wordpress.com/2016/06/03/supplement-to-some-rad-guitarists-major-chord-scale-worksheet-tertian-harmony/

after I've worked out what kabadi man means!
first I'll focus on the major triads only to start!!!