#1
You never oiled your rosewood fretboard?
I know it would dry out and look and feel dry but what would be any worse scenarios that would/could occur?Would it crack maybe?Or is drying out the worst outcome?
#2
well I have left guitars in cases for years and they have been fine. I have seen guitars pulled out of a case they had not left in 40+ years and as long as the temperature and humidity are not extreme they have been just fine after a good cleaning.

Playing the guitar will actually add some of the oil from your hands to it also (besides just adding gunk to the fret-board.
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#3
Quote by EyeballPaul
You never oiled your rosewood fretboard?
I know it would dry out and look and feel dry but what would be any worse scenarios that would/could occur?Would it crack maybe?Or is drying out the worst outcome?


Nothing would happen. The reason rosewood and ebony are left unfinished is that there's more than enough oil within the wood to prevent anything bad happening to them without a finish. Oiling them is largely cosmetic, and to prevent moisture, salts and dirt from your sweat from getting into the surface of the wood, but the integrity of the fretboard itself will be fine. it'll just look dry.
#4
One more thing -- the tiny bottles of goop that purport to "penetrate deeper" and all that are just ways to separate you from your cash.

And that includes Fret Doctor, Gerlitz fretboard "Honey" etc.
#5
Quote by dspellman
One more thing -- the tiny bottles of goop that purport to "penetrate deeper" and all that are just ways to separate you from your cash.

And that includes Fret Doctor, Gerlitz fretboard "Honey" etc.

Oh yeah?
#7
Quote by dspellman
Hmm. The link is to an article that features tiny bottles of Gibson-branded goop.

For better tone
#8
I don't think it matters much if the timber is properly seasoned to start with and it is kept in a reasonably kind environment. However I would rather play safe and I do mine every few years. I use Dr Ducks at the rate of about 2 ml per year over maybe 15 guitars, so I'm not too worried about the cost.
#9
If you don't oil your fretboard, the guitar police will show up at your house, beat you, confiscate your instrument, and then proceed to flirt with your significant other in front of you. In addition, they will confiscate any alcohol on the premises.

In all seriousness, not much unless you live in some extremely dry environment. I had never heard of oiling a fretboard and easily let a solid 15 years go by without ever oiling a board. Suddenly the internet was like - oil your fretboard or your guitar will explode!!! I do now... on occasion, but merely for looks than anything else. It does give a nice rich shine to the board. In fact, I've been a bit of a cheater and have put a little dye on some of my boards to darken them up. I think dye is a better option than oil if you want to deal with coloration. I had one board that, no matter the amount of oiling, just looked awful. Hit it with some dye, looks fantastic now. It was just ugly rosewood that needed some help, I guess.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#10
Quote by ThunderPunk
In all seriousness, not much unless you live in some extremely dry environment. I had never heard of oiling a fretboard and easily let a solid 15 years go by without ever oiling a board. Suddenly the internet was like - oil your fretboard or your guitar will explode!!! I do now... on occasion, but merely for looks than anything else. It does give a nice rich shine to the board. In fact, I've been a bit of a cheater and have put a little dye on some of my boards to darken them up. I think dye is a better option than oil if you want to deal with coloration. I had one board that, no matter the amount of oiling, just looked awful. Hit it with some dye, looks fantastic now. It was just ugly rosewood that needed some help, I guess.

Pretty much. How often do you reckon these two put "conditioner" on their fretboards?

#11
I don't know,Rory's board looks pretty dark.My LP's gets lighter in colour when it's dry,Lighter than that.Maybe his tech used to do it?
#12
Might just be that the rosewood on that particular guitar is that dark in color.

There is a lot of diversity when it comes to rosewood, to be honest. Every rosewood board I have looks different. My Gibson boards are totally different than my Fender boards. My Fender boards are all different from each other. Some darker, some lighter. I have one board that is nearly as dark, if not as dark, as Rory's board in that picture. It's been oiled maybe 3 times in the 20 years I've owned it. And, to be honest, oiling it made no difference at all in appearance or feel.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#13
Yeah, I'd bet money that if you asked Rory's tech how often he oiled the fretboard he'd look at you funny. Seems to me it's only pretty recently that fretboard oil's been marketed as anything other than maybe "make your fretboard look marginally nicer", if that.
#14
One other issue is the inlays. If you have a guitar with no inlays and no binding you may not be able to tell what's going on with the fretboard. But on some guitars, especially those with large inlays you can tell. I've seen some guitars where inlays come unglued, not sure if it's a wood issue or a glue issue. Or others where over time gaps between the inlay and the fretboard appear, not sure if it's was because of a dry fretboard, or too much oil or what.
#15
Quote by dthmtl3
One other issue is the inlays. If you have a guitar with no inlays and no binding you may not be able to tell what's going on with the fretboard. But on some guitars, especially those with large inlays you can tell. I've seen some guitars where inlays come unglued, not sure if it's a wood issue or a glue issue. Or others where over time gaps between the inlay and the fretboard appear, not sure if it's was because of a dry fretboard, or too much oil or what.


Sometimes it's neither wood nor glue, but the inlays themselves. Gibson has long used "Pearloid" inlays, which shrink, crack, discolor and even powder over time (it's made out of the same basic plastic material (nitrocellulose) as the finishes). It's one of the ways that they verify the old bursts. Real MOP inlays (as used in Customs) don't do any of that, and the jury is still out on the acrylic inlays that Gibson has used recently.