#1
I just received my mixes back for my songs. Everything is level, but in one of the songs, the vocals are much deeper (tonally) in the first verse than the second verse. That being said, you can not notice the tonal difference through headphones or when the music is loud in any car...You can only hear it through computer speakers or through Iphone speakers.....Why is this? The track is also unmastered.

Thanks!
#2
Who knows what could've happened in the mix. This is something to be addressed with your mix engineer.
My guess would be that computer speakers cut out a certain amount of low frequency, thus leaving more emphasis on the vocal frequencies and you can notice it.

In some cases mastering could fix it but look at the vocal treatment with the mix engineer, something different might be done with that verset o change the tonality.
#3
Thank you so much for the input. He said that he can't notice it through the studio monitors, but also only notices it through his phone speaker when he listened back that way. I had a few other engineers that I know personally listen back, and none of them pointed out a vocal tonality issue....Hmm, maybe I just notice it more because it's MY voice?
#4
Yeah you'll always place a lot more significance on your own specific parts than everybody else's, it's just kind of natural. Vocally this is particularly true.

Your average computer speakers (not studio monitors) typically have a bass boost to them if they're fairly cheap, so they'll definitely accentuate a deeper frequency ('moar bass means better speakers'!)*.

The iPhone speakers... well, they're shite. They don't actually carry any bass whatsoever, so they start turning whatever they can into bass. What's probably happening is that the iPhone speakers can't reproduce the majority of the natural bass in the track so what you're hearing is that your vocals now 'poke' out because the rest of mix has been reduced in it's bass response.

Try listening to a bass gear demo's on youtube through any phone's speakers, then compare it to a typical speaker. In some cases the iPhone goes nearly completely silent - which is hilarious - and the typical speakers throw waaaaay to much bass out.


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#5
Quote by Anthony1991
Yeah you'll always place a lot more significance on your own specific parts than everybody else's, it's just kind of natural. Vocally this is particularly true.

Your average computer speakers (not studio monitors) typically have a bass boost to them if they're fairly cheap, so they'll definitely accentuate a deeper frequency ('moar bass means better speakers'!)*.

The iPhone speakers... well, they're shite. They don't actually carry any bass whatsoever, so they start turning whatever they can into bass. What's probably happening is that the iPhone speakers can't reproduce the majority of the natural bass in the track so what you're hearing is that your vocals now 'poke' out because the rest of mix has been reduced in it's bass response.

Try listening to a bass gear demo's on youtube through any phone's speakers, then compare it to a typical speaker. In some cases the iPhone goes nearly completely silent - which is hilarious - and the typical speakers throw waaaaay to much bass out.


*Things stupid people say


Thanks for the in-depth explanation! See, if I turn up the volume in the car, or through headphones, everything vocally is the same tone. So, would you think that mastering should help this?
#6
Quote by dustin.schumach
Thanks for the in-depth explanation! See, if I turn up the volume in the car, or through headphones, everything vocally is the same tone. So, would you think that mastering should help this?


Well mastering doesn't alter frequencies, it only increases and decreases their volume - mixing is what alters frequencies. To be honest if so few people can hear it i'd just leave it You can drive yourself absolutely insane with stuff like this and unless you have an unlimited budget sometimes you just gotta let stuff go.

It's not pleasant but sometimes that's the way it goes. My band put out a single recently where there's a guitar tone that lingers in the background and is really fucking annoying... But only people with good guitar-driven ears can hear it. Super annoying to me and I hate the recording, but we can't keep going back and spending more money on mixing.

Sometimes getting something done is better than getting something perfect Just an unfortunately reality of life
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#8
Quote by diabolical
It really is about how much of a deal breaker it is for you.


vs how much money you want to keep spending
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#9
Quote by Anthony1991
vs how much money you want to keep spending


I didn't even notice it myself until I put it through computer speakers....Now, all I do is notice it...but it's already been sent to mastering. I've had about six fresh sets of ears on it that were not involved with the album or in the band, and no one brought it up...Just hoping I'm overthinking it all...sigh.
#10
Do you have a good relationship with your engineer? You should be able to send it to him and he will be able to make adjustments. Especially if you are paying him.
#11
Quote by dustin.schumach
I didn't even notice it myself until I put it through computer speakers....Now, all I do is notice it...but it's already been sent to mastering. I've had about six fresh sets of ears on it that were not involved with the album or in the band, and no one brought it up...Just hoping I'm overthinking it all...sigh.


Even big, big names in the industry with really good reputations make mistakes and have imperfections in their records, so I really wouldn't worry about it
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#12
Sounds like the vocal could possibly benefit from a multiband compressor. During tracking, the vocalist probably sang closer to the mic for one of the verses, thus boosting the low end for that verse. The compression that the mixer used likely evened out the volume well, but tonally they will still be different.

From my experience, the 150hz-300hz area is where you would get that bassier sound in the vocal. I've found that everything seems to audibly fall off below that with vocals- but ive been questioning everything that I do lately because ive been struggling for consistency.

But yea, multiband compressor to even out those lower vocal frequencies would probably fix that issue
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