#1
I've gotten some complaints recently on my picking fundamentals, and how you should be picking with your wrist more than arm.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uU_0T6OhdA

This guitar solo was made and played within these three shots since i did not have enough time to single take it. I am willing to take any advice to improve my technique in order to become a better player.

Currently how i alternate pick is i use my arm to cross strings, and a half-half combo of wrist and arm for playing at high speeds on a single string.

Note: I am self-taught and cant afford a teacher
#2
Well, Rusty Cooley has been using that technique for 30 years and he's a phenomenal technician. Whether or not he'll be able to it for another 30 years we'll have to wait and see. He's also a very athletic player whose physiology might be slightly different than yours or mine, and there's a possibility that your techniques merely look similar and he could be engaging different groups of muscles that lead to less fatigue or repetitive stress. If it's the case that you shot it in three shots for time that's fine, it's just suspicious that the cuts are right before and right after you switch to forearm technique. If you really had to cut it because it's hard to switch from wrist to forearm in the midst of the song then I'd seriously reconsider the technique or try to work on how to switch them on a dime. If you want to get an up close look at elite styles of picking to try some out and see if they work better for you check out Troy Grady's videos on pick slanting, and his evaluations of the picking techniques of Paul Gilbert, Michael Angelo Batio, Al DiMeola, Martin Miller, etc.

For other aspects of your technique your vibrato is nice and slow, even, and well controlled, but you can probably go a little wider with it for more impact. Keep the same motions you have now but go a little farther on the bend. Or not!! That's just personal taste. Lastly, as a guitar teacher the first thing I'd tell you is to not let your left hand knuckles collapse like that. The first knuckle bone after the fingernail should always be arched, except for on the first finger to facilitate muting on higher strings. When you do your fast run, notice how your second finger's arch collapses, that's no bueno señor
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#3
If you wanted people to analyse your picking why have you uploaded a video where the camera is focused on your fretting hand - we can barely see your picking hand!
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#4
Quote by DaliLama
Well, Rusty Cooley has been using that technique for 30 years and he's a phenomenal technician. Whether or not he'll be able to it for another 30 years we'll have to wait and see. He's also a very athletic player whose physiology might be slightly different than yours or mine, and there's a possibility that your techniques merely look similar and he could be engaging different groups of muscles that lead to less fatigue or repetitive stress. If it's the case that you shot it in three shots for time that's fine, it's just suspicious that the cuts are right before and right after you switch to forearm technique. If you really had to cut it because it's hard to switch from wrist to forearm in the midst of the song then I'd seriously reconsider the technique or try to work on how to switch them on a dime. If you want to get an up close look at elite styles of picking to try some out and see if they work better for you check out Troy Grady's videos on pick slanting, and his evaluations of the picking techniques of Paul Gilbert, Michael Angelo Batio, Al DiMeola, Martin Miller, etc.

For other aspects of your technique your vibrato is nice and slow, even, and well controlled, but you can probably go a little wider with it for more impact. Keep the same motions you have now but go a little farther on the bend. Or not!! That's just personal taste. Lastly, as a guitar teacher the first thing I'd tell you is to not let your left hand knuckles collapse like that. The first knuckle bone after the fingernail should always be arched, except for on the first finger to facilitate muting on higher strings. When you do your fast run, notice how your second finger's arch collapses, that's no bueno señor


Thanks for the reply. I find that when completely warmed up, my hand feels very much looser as well as my arm after deep stretches and basic 1234 fret warmups at a moderate speed, and i can alternate pick super fast with my arm plus wrist. Using my wrist to cross strings is also something i utilize when doing alternate picking runs that have frequent string crossing and similar alterations for left hand patterns, such as (my favorite) an E minor run from the 12th fret bottom E string to the first fret top B string. If its a vertical shift across 3 strings then slide up the neck for a similar pattern I'd use my arm. Its more about conscious awareness and keeping the movement steady and accurate. I can very easily nail this solo in one take, i just didnt have enough time to practice it for the video and recorded it across 3 takes

The adjustment of keeping my left hand knuckles up bent and less collapsed the opposite way is more of a control thing right now. It is a surprisingly easy adjustment and i actually feel more speed accuracy and less tension in my left hand, so that is very useful. As for bends, i find it distracting when guitarists do very fast and triangly sounding bends. It screams a more urgent and rushed tone and takes away from the emotion. I can definitely widen my bends, i tried it and they sound much much fuller
Last edited by sourcegamer101 at Jun 7, 2016,
#5
Your technique sucks. No explanation for why will be given.

Just kidding! Looking good man! If I could flatpick as well as you use your pick I'd be very happy.
Last edited by TobusRex at Jun 7, 2016,
#6
Right hand is too tense, forcing you to trem pick from the elbow. Let that fist go so your fingers can relax, which will release your wrist a bit more. It looks better when you're picking more slowly.

Your left fingers should be more on the tips. Using the pads is less precise and makes good legato impossible, including bends in the lower register. You may not hear the difference right away with such heavy distortion, but legato technique sounds better and is so much more reliable when it's done right. You don't want to be always wondering if the note is going to flub or the string is going to slip out from the bend.
#8
do that without all the distortion and delay and then we'll se where you are really at. distortion and delay cover up mistakes and make it tough to really judge.
#9
You look pretty tense when you play. The only thing I could suggest is work on being more relaxed/having a light touch (if that makes sense).
Gear:
Dean RC7X (Bareknuckle Coldsweat pickups)
Ibanez Rg2570Z (Bareknuckle Juggernaughts)
Schecter KM-6
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid 7 String
Engl Powerball II
Orange PPC412
Line 6 Pod HD500X