#1
This is not a criticism and there is no right or wrong position so I don't want to make it sound that way. It's mostly just out of curiosity. When I buy a guitar I do so with the idea that from that day on I will always own it (of course that is not always true but I start that way). I don't remember ever buying a guitar based on what I thought it would be worth down the road yet I see comments where people say "you should choose guitar A over guitar B because that guitar will hold it's value longer". I wonder how many people use future value as a criteria for their guitar purchases?
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#3
definitely no...

i own an epiphone aj100 and a yamaha pacifica which i caught from the "4-letter auction" to find out if this hobby is of any fun for me...
they were both rather cheap and IF i ever sell them again i can be quite sure i wont get rich...

i will probably buy one "real" guitar ( 95% a 100/200 taylor ) within the next 1 or 2 years, but this also will not happen to earn money
#4
i wish i did. i always invoke the "one in-one out" rule but i'm too concerned with the in part to take into consideration the "but nobody's heard of this defunct custom brand"
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#5
Nope. I actually just seem to buy new ones all the time, without selling the old ones, because i like them all. I have sold a few of them in the past, but only the ones i really hated. But buying because of resale value is kinda silly if you ask me. Its like getting married, but you are already planing a divorce.
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#6
Occasionally.

When I'm in the market for a new guitar, I find it good to have a search set up for all new listings on ebay (in addition to a specific search for whatever I may be looking for). It's surprising how many times you see a good guitar listed as buy it now with a price way below the going rate. When I see one, I'll often snap it up with the intention of selling it on at some point.
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#7
Sometimes, like for my last purchase, an ibanez prestige 7 string. It was sold for half of its real value and I bought it thinking I could resell it easily if I didn't get used to the 7th string. It is now my main axe, so that won't happen any time soon.

I also take the price in account when buying pedals, since I "often" buy and resell them, just to try them out. Don't want to lose money on that
#8
It's definitely a factor, like getting an LP studio over a high end Epi because of the resale value if it ever came to it (hopefully it won't!). But it can't be a leading area, seeing that the goal with guitars is to keep and play them.
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#9
Not really. Guitars are meant to be played, not sold.

If I was concerned with losing too much money when I bought a guitar and ended up not liking it, I buy it used. Almost all the depreciation that occurs when buying something new has already happened that way.
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#10
I often advise beginners to do that. The reason is that they're often worried that they won't get on with guitar, so don't want to spend too much money, so they'll go for some cheap piece of crap, which might well fall apart before they get bored enough to sell it anyway.

But if they buy a more expensive (well-made) guitar (a) it will sound better and be easier to play - so they're less likely to get bored or frustrated - and (b) if they do ever decide to give up, then they will get their money back - maybe even make a profit if it's a really good instrument. It's a kind of insurance policy.

IOW, the resale value is still a side issue - the main reason is quality (of sound and manufacture). But beginners are less able to appreciate the finer details of sound, while they will appreciate the idea that they won't lose money.

Personally, I've never considered resale value when buying an instrument - but sometimes I wish I had, because I'd go for a lower-priced instrument, thinking I couldn't justify the expense of a better one. (The lower price one would be "good enough" .) But resale value is a good justification - especially to any partner who thinks you're spending too much on your hobby! (Of course, you'd never sell it, not until you were 110 years old and your hands no longer worked or you'd forgotten how to play....)
Last edited by jongtr at Jun 7, 2016,
#11
Quote by Rickholly74
This is not a criticism and there is no right or wrong position so I don't want to make it sound that way. It's mostly just out of curiosity. When I buy a guitar I do so with the idea that from that day on I will always own it (of course that is not always true but I start that way). I don't remember ever buying a guitar based on what I thought it would be worth down the road yet I see comments where people say "you should choose guitar A over guitar B because that guitar will hold it's value longer". I wonder how many people use future value as a criteria for their guitar purchases?


Buying a guitar with a resale in mind is like buying a car with a resale in mind - it's a terribly stupid reason.

That being said, for those who are buying mid-tier instruments ( i.e. under $700)with the idea of upgrading to a more expensive guitar later, than buying a well known brand can make the eventual sale of your cheaper guitar easier/quicker. But that has nothing to do with value, but rather ease of selling.
#12
I wouldn't buy a guitar I liked less because its resale was better (apart from anything else, likely to become a self-fulfilling prophecy), but if there were two guitars I liked equally which were the same price, the resale might swing it. I don't buy a guitar meaning to flip it, either, but as you said, you never know for sure what's going to happen down the line.

EDIT: ^ that's a very good point about people who can't afford what they want now, but who need something to tide them over until they can afford it.
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#13
Unless it's some rare one, I can't see why you'd really do that. Seems like used ones tend to run half what new does, so that alone makes it hard to justify selling for profit--at least in the same way you would treat stocks, bonds, commodities, etc.
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#14
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Unless it's some rare one, I can't see why you'd really do that. Seems like used ones tend to run half what new does, so that alone makes it hard to justify selling for profit--at least in the same way you would treat stocks, bonds, commodities, etc.


once you get to where you're only spending 1-2k or more on instruments it's hard to justify having more invested in hunks of wood than you do your car. a lot of people "flip" instruments - not necessarily for profit, but so they can try tons of instruments and find what they specifically want without having to save for months between each purchase.
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#15
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once you get to where you're only spending 1-2k or more on instruments
"Only"?? Poverty-stricken UK reader here....
(Actually I do have at least one instrument that's worth more than that - but I paid less for it, some while back.)
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it's hard to justify having more invested in hunks of wood than you do your car
Except a nicely put together hunk of wood will hold its value way more than a car will (however nicely put together the latter is).
That guitar I speak of is probably worth 6 times what I paid for it 30 years ago (it was already 20 years old at that point). If I had a 50-year old car....

... OK, maybe a similar increase due to vintage value I guess, but then I would have had to look after it. The guitar has had nothing done to it (except been played of course). Metal rusts. Wood matures.
Quote by Hail

. a lot of people "flip" instruments - not necessarily for profit, but so they can try tons of instruments and find what they specifically want without having to save for months between each purchase.
Yes, good idea. Except I'd probably want them all...
#16
Well, when I buy a guitar I don't care neither for its value nor its resale value...
The only thing I worry about is the comfortability because if I want I can improve both its sound
by upgrading it and its looks with stunning paintjobs etc.
If someone worries too much about the resale value he shouldn't buy it because he is not really sure for what he's doing. As a result it's likely 101% not to be satisfied from the gu8itar and sale it.
#17
Thanks everyone. Some great answers here. It was just my own curiosity after reading the answer in thread where someone posted a question about choosing which guitar to buy: guitar A and guitar b. Instead of answering in terms of which was better quality, playability etc. two people gave similar answers about choosing the guitar that will "have a higher resale value". Since I have never thought in those terms I was curious about others here. Thanks again.
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#18
Quote by DHF1234
The only thing I worry about is the comfortability because if I want I can improve both its sound by upgrading it and its looks with stunning paintjobs etc.
LOL. I once gave a cheap old second-hand guitar a psychedelic paintjob (back when psychedelia was current and I was young enough to think it was a cool idea). It was part of the reason I failed an audition at that time ("your funny guitar..."), and I ended up selling it to a friend shortly afterwards for less than I paid for it. (The paint was not easily removable.)
That model - naturally - is now a highly desirable collector's item or would be if someone else along the way had managed to restore it. Unspoilt models the same age go for prices around 15 times what I sold it for. Even modern copies are 10 times.

Of course, I agree about usability. The sound and playability is paramount - 50/50 I'd say. And you can improve playability on all but the worst guitars - and sound can be improved on electric guitars (not so much on acoustics). Resale value depends more on the name on the headstock than on the musical quality of the instrument.
Last edited by jongtr at Jun 9, 2016,