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#1
Which music from the last few decades do you think will still be listened to in 100 years?


Allan Holdsworths albums
#2
Vengaboys, because in 100 years time, people will still be terrible.
Quote by Diemon Dave
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#3
Darude Sandstorm
There's nothing left here to be saved
Just barreling dogs and barking trains
Another year lost to the blue line
#4
who cares. ill be long gone.
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#7
Quote by jakesmellspoo
who cares. ill be long gone.
give me a chance

I imagine Muse will be

by that time, Muse will be seen as this generation's Mozart
#8
Quote by EndTheRapture51
BrokenCYDE

Because it will accurately reflect how people feel broken inside.
Quote by Diemon Dave
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#9
None of it.

Think about music from 100 years ago now - how much of it is still listened to? Basically none. Okay yes, on occasion of course it is, but on a regular basis you'll rarely hear a conversation that goes 'Hey buddy, what you listening to?' 'Oh, just a bit of Holst'.

Stuff like Michael Jackson, Prince, Radiohead, Queen, Led Zeppelin and some other 'big' artists will be studied and appreciated, but I don't think much of it will still be regularly listened to by anyone.
#10
Once you get to anybody out after 1980 or so, not much.
I just looked at the most popular music of 1916 and I don't recognize any of it.

1930s is when I start seeing people I actually still listen to.
1920s has a few people I've actually heard their names before.
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jun 8, 2016,
#11
Quote by matt bickerton
None of it.

Think about music from 100 years ago now - how much of it is still listened to? Basically none. Okay yes, on occasion of course it is, but on a regular basis you'll rarely hear a conversation that goes 'Hey buddy, what you listening to?' 'Oh, just a bit of Holst'.

We have orders of magnitude better reporting of music than any other time in history. Modern pop music is effortlessly reported on a global scale.

I don't nessesarily think the last 100 years of music are going to represent what'll happen to ours.
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#12
Bach posse hmu

There are probably a few rare gems here and there, but there's just way too much music nowadays and the majority of it will be forgotten.
#13
Quote by matt bickerton
None of it.

Think about music from 100 years ago now - how much of it is still listened to? Basically none. Okay yes, on occasion of course it is, but on a regular basis you'll rarely hear a conversation that goes 'Hey buddy, what you listening to?' 'Oh, just a bit of Holst'.

Stuff like Michael Jackson, Prince, Radiohead, Queen, Led Zeppelin and some other 'big' artists will be studied and appreciated, but I don't think much of it will still be regularly listened to by anyone.


Is it because of the availability of recordings 100 years ago?
#14
availability seems to be more of a spectrum.

Items that are well preserved (text tablets, recordings, etc) in a situation of scarcity become incredibly valuable. The same idea in a situation where 3 in 4 chuckleheads are loading excellent quality copies of their life's work to be archived - we're going to experience a surplus of well recorded crap.

Having access to that quantity of data is going to be as defeating as data scarcity - as you'll be sifting through a boat load of high quality crap to find the gems.


When you remove or significantly reduce the barrier of entry, you end up with:
https://youtu.be/KAEHPmHYpbM
Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance - Confucius
Last edited by dPrimmy at Jun 8, 2016,
#15
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
We have orders of magnitude better reporting of music than any other time in history. Modern pop music is effortlessly reported on a global scale.

I don't nessesarily think the last 100 years of music are going to represent what'll happen to ours.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Is it because of the availability of recordings 100 years ago?
But we still have accurate sheet music etc. and have subsequently got decent enough replications by orchestras etc.

Even if our recordings age better/are easier to share, I still think very little of our music will still be listened to purely because it'll have aged and 100 years worth of more relevant music will have taken it's place.

It's impossible for us to comprehend what music will be like in 100 years because if we were somehow able to hear it right now, it'd probably sound absolutely awful to us.
Last edited by matt bickerton at Jun 8, 2016,
#17
Quote by Redsectoreh
I would put money on Pink Floyd, Dark Side if anything will stand the test of time.

laaaaaaaaaame
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#18
Quote by matt bickerton
None of it.

Think about music from 100 years ago now - how much of it is still listened to? Basically none. Okay yes, on occasion of course it is, but on a regular basis you'll rarely hear a conversation that goes 'Hey buddy, what you listening to?' 'Oh, just a bit of Holst'.


Maybe not in whatever music you listen to, but in many genres like Americana, bluegrass, jazz, country, western swing, and a lot of traditional music, artists and tunes from 100 years ago are still very popular. When I jam with other musicians playing bluegrass or Irish music, the majority of the tunes we play are 50-100 year old standards and even many traditional tunes like Cripple Creek and Whiskey in the Jar and Rocky Road to Dublin and Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ye and Shady Grove that are far older still, some dating back beyond the American Civil War. Whiskey in the Jar might be the most popular and well known Irish tune and it's over 300 years old.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#19
Being that Beethoven and Mozart are still household names I'd say it's more about impact than sophisticated record keeping.

Although Im starting to suspect that a lot of people just claim to love classical music to try to make themselves seem cultured and smart but really never listen to it.
A brand new Mozart peice surfaced earlier this year and it seems no one in pop culture gave a fuck
#22
truthfully, 100 years is a long ass time so a lot of things could happen in that time.

anyway, just about anything can have longevity. even on a very small scale. a lot of the shit i listen to isnt hoing to be widely remembered/revered years from now, but its not exactly super popular now anyway.

music will always find its fans as long as the recordings exist somewhere.

and if not the original recordings, covers are a thing, too.
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#23
Folk music is tricky because each generation is gonna perform the songs differently.
A song like Pretty Polly which might be 500+ years old is still a folk staple today but it's gonna sound very different played by modern musicians than it did 100+ years ago.

Where classical music is more structured and isnt played much differently today than it was when it was written.
#24
Quote by jakesmellspoo
truthfully, 100 years is a long ass time so a lot of things could happen in that time.
I mean I like to riff on the idea that something could wipe out large portions of digital archives in the world but what could happen that would truly erase things like Smack My Bitch Up?
#25
Quote by Banjocal
I mean I like to riff on the idea that something could wipe out large portions of digital archives in the world but what could happen that would truly erase things like Smack My Bitch Up?

A shitload of coronal mass ejections?
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#26
Quote by EyeNon15
Where classical music is more structured and isnt played much differently today than it was when it was written.

and thats why its booooooooooring.
mugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmug
#27
Some kid that has 5 YouTube followers now will be discovered as genius in 100 years
#28
Quote by EyeNon15
classical music is more structured and isnt played much differently today than it was when it was written.


This has more to do with classical music having a snobby, elitist, traditionalist attitude often accompanying it. It's like you said about classical music being a way to pretend that you are sophisticated. You get a bunch of pompous music professors that insist that the music must be done a certain way and the attitude perpetuates. It's like that scene in Crossroads when Eugene played Turkish March and had that bluesy ending and the professor got mad.

If classical musicians were more open minded and rich people didn't pretend to like it, I think it would be played differently. Many musicians outside of the classical world (rock, folk, jazz, funk, bluegrass, metal, electronic, etc) have rearranged and reimagined classical pieces in all kind of new ways.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#29
Quote by theogonia777
Maybe not in whatever music you listen to, but in many genres like Americana, bluegrass, jazz, country, western swing, and a lot of traditional music, artists and tunes from 100 years ago are still very popular. When I jam with other musicians playing bluegrass or Irish music, the majority of the tunes we play are 50-100 year old standards and even many traditional tunes like Cripple Creek and Whiskey in the Jar and Rocky Road to Dublin and Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ye and Shady Grove that are far older still, some dating back beyond the American Civil War. Whiskey in the Jar might be the most popular and well known Irish tune and it's over 300 years old.
Interesting points, some I'd not thought much about.

I guess perhaps the appeal with them there is that in a way, they were the starting points of what music has evolved into today? Thus they still have relevance, as they were the 'firsts', if you will.

I guess by that logic then, it's almost impossible for us to know which music will still be listened to in 100 years as it's impossible to know in which direction music will go. Songs around now that are deemed early evolutions of any future genres/sub-genres might still be appreciated, but anything that's the last of it's kind or tame in terms of pushing boundaries will probably be forgotten about.
#30
There's probably going to be a lot of music around that people recognize in 100 years(Yankee Doodle. Camptown Races,etc) but as far as any specific musicians that will still be listened to in 100 years is a very slim list I would imagine.
I'm sure ppl like Michael Jackson and the Beatles will still be known about as far as how they impacted pop culture
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jun 8, 2016,
#31
Quote by matt bickerton
But we still have accurate sheet music etc. and have subsequently got decent enough replications by orchestras etc.

Even if our recordings age better/are easier to share, I still think very little of our music will still be listened to purely because it'll have aged and 100 years worth of more relevant music will have taken it's place.

That would be true for the vast majority of music, but we are talking about the minority that won't be forgotten. I still think the minority of music that'll still be remembered will be larger. If solely because of the better record keeping meaning far less losses of intellectual property from accidental loss, destruction of archives etc. and because it has a far, far greater reach than the music 100 years ago ever did. Those are advantages the music 100 years ago never really had and that should be accounted for in any case.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jun 8, 2016,
#33
any famous classic rock groups like led zep, beatles, pink floyd, etc

timeless... classics...
people will always listen to "universal" rock
same thing with classical music, like Beethoven.
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#34
Music from the last few decades? Like 1990 up until now? Hmm... I don't actually have any artists on my iPod from this time period. Robert Glasper isn't popular. I mean, if Wayne Shorter isn't popular, there's no way anyone is gonna remember Robert Glasper and or Chris Dave and the Drumheadz.

Btbam aren't even relevant anymore.

Animals as Leaders aren't going anywhere. I would like to think my music will stand the test of time and be remembered like Chopin(:
#35
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
Music from the last few decades? Like 1990 up until now? Hmm... I don't actually have any artists on my iPod from this time period. Robert Glasper isn't popular. I mean, if Wayne Shorter isn't popular, there's no way anyone is gonna remember Robert Glasper and or Chris Dave and the Drumheadz.

Btbam aren't even relevant anymore.

Animals as Leaders aren't going anywhere. I would like to think my music will stand the test of time and be remembered like Chopin(:

What, your name will be used in a really bad pun like his is(you know those shitty frdige magnets that say stuff like "gone Chopin, Bach later") but noone who owns one can tell his work from Holst?
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#40
I'm no Nostradamus, but my guess is Alestorm
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