#1
I have a Jay Turser Strat that MAPs at $179 that I got solely because it was pretty. It sounds reasonable too, but the tone knobs have to be rolled down to 5 or 6. Bass has to be cranked elsehow to get a "good" tone. I kind of figured that it was just because I have a cheap strat, until...

I played on a friend's MIA Fender Strat and it was the same way. Roll down the tone knobs and it is usable. Now granted I was playing on the Fender through a Blues Jr., and the Jay Turser through an Orange Rocker 30, VOX AC30C2, and a Valveking.

Anyways, I am not really sure. As you can tell I have little experience with Strats so I am just curious if the "over-brightness" is applicable to every Strat-style or just the few I have played. Also, I am not a mellow-voiced player. My main amp is the AC30 on the Top Boost Channel.
Last edited by Will Lane at Jun 10, 2016,
#2
It's entirely subject to personal taste, so no.
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#3
This literally happens with none of my strats. Maybe you just aren't dialing them in right?
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#4
I roll my tone & volume knobs back to 5 or 6, and then set up my amp with that as a baseline.


I can see how plugging into my amp with knobs on 10 would produce an ice-pick bright tone - but it sounds like you're trying to compensate your amp settings by dialing back the guitar - when you can actually attack and balance your problem on 2 fronts.
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#5
Quote by Will Lane
I have a Jay Turser Strat that MAPs at $179 that I got solely because it was pretty. It sounds reasonable too, but the tone knobs have to be rolled down to 5 or 6. Bass has to be cranked elsehow to get a "good" tone. I kind of figured that it was just because I have a cheap strat, until...

I played on a friend's MIA Fender Strat and it was the same way. Roll down the tone knobs and it is usable. Now granted I was playing on the Fender through a Blues Jr., and the Jay Turser through an Orange Rocker 30, VOX AC30C2, and a Valveking.

Anyways, I am not really sure. As you can tell I have little experience with Strats so I am just curious if the "over-brightness" is applicable to every Strat-style or just the few I have played. Also, I am not a mellow-voiced player. My main amp is the AC30 on the Top Boost Channel.
Why is it you think that the tones knobs are intended to be dimed in the first place? That why they put them on the guitar, so you can set the guitar to where you need to listen to it.

Different frequencies are perceived differently at different volumes:

Two gentlemen named Fletcher & Munson studies this effect at some length:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher%E2%80%93Munson_curves

The tone you need playing in a band is quite a bit different that that of sitting on your ass at home by yourself. This is due to auditory masking:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auditory_masking

Telecasters are generally even brighter than Strats. Teles are the darlings of much of the country music set, for that very twangy reason. Not to mention they often play them through a bunch of very clean, bright, Fender amps.

Besides, you might be a humbucker person, and should have coped a Les Paul clone instead...
#6
It also has to do with the type of amp and how its set up.
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#7
I will admit that I find a typical Strat with the tone nob dimed to be a bit bright, but it doesn't really bug me as that can be a useful sound. I especially like how bright a Strat is when I use a fuzz, it helps everything cut through a bit better.

Clean, I prefer the tone nob rolled down. I will say, I personally don't have any use for the normal SC bridge pickup. I always through a humbucker or a stacked pickup in that position.
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#9
Quote by Will Lane
I have a Jay Turser Strat that MAPs at $179 that I got solely because it was pretty. It sounds reasonable too, but the tone knobs have to be rolled down to 5 or 6. Bass has to be cranked elsehow to get a "good" tone. I kind of figured that it was just because I have a cheap strat, until...

I played on a friend's MIA Fender Strat and it was the same way. Roll down the tone knobs and it is usable. Now granted I was playing on the Fender through a Blues Jr., and the Jay Turser through an Orange Rocker 30, VOX AC30C2, and a Valveking.

Anyways, I am not really sure. As you can tell I have little experience with Strats so I am just curious if the "over-brightness" is applicable to every Strat-style or just the few I have played. Also, I am not a mellow-voiced player. My main amp is the AC30 on the Top Boost Channel.


1) You should not have to roll the tone knob back at all on a strat typically - if you do, the amp is set too bright. I have an American Standard Strat and a Silhouette Special HSS from Musicman, I never roll back the tone knob at all. The trick is to set the amp to work with the guitar.

2) Listen to Hendrix and SRV - if you consider that "bright" then a Strat simply isn't for you. I find the tone to be incredibly deep and fat, with a snap, if you use it with right amp.

3) I rented an AC 30 for a weekend before buying my Lonestar Special Amp - it's a great amp, but I found it too bright for single coils personally, especially on any cleaner settings.

4) You lose some tone when rolling back the tone knob too much - the beauty of single coils is in the percussive "snap" and you lose a lot of that as you roll back the tone. In my experience, you get better results sending your whole signal to the amp and adjusting the presence or treble on the amp to find the right balance.
Last edited by reverb66 at Jun 10, 2016,
#10
Quote by Captaincranky
1. Why is it you think that the tones knobs are intended to be dimed in the first place? That why they put them on the guitar, so you can set the guitar to where you need to listen to it.

2. Besides, you might be a humbucker person, and should have coped a Les Paul clone instead...
1. Well I don't really make that a hard and fast rule. I am used to diming the tone knobs on my humbucker-equipped guitars so maybe that is part of it.

2. I think I am...
Quote by dPrimmy
I roll my tone & volume knobs back to 5 or 6, and then set up my amp with that as a baseline.

I can see how plugging into my amp with knobs on 10 would produce an ice-pick bright tone - but it sounds like you're trying to compensate your amp settings by dialing back the guitar - when you can actually attack and balance your problem on 2 fronts.
Quote by reverb66
1) You should not have to roll the tone knob back at all on a strat typically - if you do, the amp is set too bright. I have an American Standard Strat and a Silhouette Special HSS from Musicman, I never roll back the tone knob at all. The trick is to set the amp to work with the guitar.
That's the fun bit. With the Jay Turser I HAVE to compensate on BOTH the guitar and amp. It did not really matter which amp of the 3 I played it through. The most recent was the Rocker 30. The Bass was maxed, mids 10 o'clock, treble 9 o'clock. Tone on the guitar was maybe 6. None of the amps I used with it were set overly bright.

With the MIA Fender Strat through the Blues Jr., it still felt bright even though the amp was not set bright. With the tone knobs at max, it was intensely ice-picky, and I think I had the controls on the amp set mostly at noon. Since I can't really immediately test the Fender Strat through any of the other equipment, nor can I test other Strats, I was curious if anyone else felt the same way.

Maybe I just need more experience with Strats.
Last edited by Will Lane at Jun 10, 2016,
#11
depends on the guitar. i'd generally roll it down a bit on the bridge pickup, but on all the other pickup settings i normally have it up full. and if you swap pickups i imagine you could get something where you didn't have to roll down the tone. a lot of the dearer fender models have no-load tone controls on the bridge pickup, too.
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#12
Quote by Captaincranky
sitting on your ass


Speaking of which, I once did a gig where I couldn't find a chair and had to sit on a speaker cab. Feedback was horrendous through my bum, my resonant frequency is about 90Hz.

I think trad strat pickups are ice-picky, but I guess they work well through the right kind of amp. I set my amps very bright, so I have to roll off the tone on most of the kind of pickups I like - but it's good to have the choice of bright or not.
#13
Quote by reverb66
1) You should not have to roll the tone knob back at all on a strat typically - if you do, the amp is set too bright. I have an American Standard Strat and a Silhouette Special HSS from Musicman, I never roll back the tone knob at all. The trick is to set the amp to work with the guitar.

It kinda works both ways - set the amp to work with the guitar and set the guitar to work with the amp. granted, some more modern amps do tend to work best with the knobs on the guitar maxed out.

Quote by reverb66
3) I rented an AC 30 for a weekend before buying my Lonestar Special Amp - it's a great amp, but I found it too bright for single coils personally, especially on any cleaner settings.

As an AC30 owner I will be the first to admit that, indeed, the top boost channel of an AC30 is too bright for some single coils, regardless of where the tone controls on the amp are set - unless you turn the tone knob on your guitar down a bit, and then it sounds really great.

Quote by reverb66
4) You lose some tone when rolling back the tone knob too much - the beauty of single coils is in the percussive "snap" and you lose a lot of that as you roll back the tone. In my experience, you get better results sending your whole signal to the amp and adjusting the presence or treble on the amp to find the right balance.

The important part here is "too much". It's all about balance. Again - making the guitar work with the amp is just as important as making the amp work with the guitar. In my personal experience, some amps respond very badly to having that "whole signal" (including the extreme spike in the treble frequencies that all pickups have to a varying extent) hitting the input, either because of the amount of treble or the overall output, and this is what causes people to think that certain guitars don't pair well with certain amps, when in actual fact it's only because they haven't considered that the guitar might need to be adjusted to work better with the amp
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#14
Quote by Will Lane
I have a Jay Turser Strat that MAPs at $179 that I got solely because it was pretty. It sounds reasonable too, but the tone knobs have to be rolled down to 5 or 6. Bass has to be cranked elsehow to get a "good" tone. I kind of figured that it was just because I have a cheap strat, until...

I played on a friend's MIA Fender Strat and it was the same way. Roll down the tone knobs and it is usable. Now granted I was playing on the Fender through a Blues Jr., and the Jay Turser through an Orange Rocker 30, VOX AC30C2, and a Valveking.

Anyways, I am not really sure. As you can tell I have little experience with Strats so I am just curious if the "over-brightness" is applicable to every Strat-style or just the few I have played. Also, I am not a mellow-voiced player. My main amp is the AC30 on the Top Boost Channel.


Just depends on your amp and setup.

Plug a Strat directly into a Marshall Plexi and dime all the knobs (Jimi)? The Strat BR PU sounds pretty ballsy.

Plug it into a Super Reverb on VTB666 (SRV)? you may need to roll off the BR PU a bit but the neck will be tits.

Plug into an AC30 TB, dime the amp volume, roll off the guitar volume, roll off the BR PU tone to taste.

I personally set up my amp so the neck PU sounds great with tone and volume wide open, then adjust the BR PU tone to taste. Different players will have different goals and objectives and set their amp differently to get their tone.

Having lots of BR PU treble bite at your disposal is a Strat feature not a bug. It gives you access to Tele twang, Surf guitar bite, Beatles "Ticket To Ride" tone, etc. A Strat is a very versatile tool which covers a lot of sonic choices. Learn to use ALL of the tool and make it yours.
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Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#15
Quote by Tony Done
Speaking of which, I once did a gig where I couldn't find a chair and had to sit on a speaker cab. Feedback was horrendous through my bum, my resonant frequency is about 90Hz..
Wow, it's a good thing you weren't sitting on a sub cabinet. You might have been struck down by the mythological "brown note".

Of course that's just silliness which has been disproved......Or has it?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_note
#16
Quote by Captaincranky
Wow, it's a good thing you weren't sitting on a sub cabinet. You might have been struck down by the mythological "brown note".

Of course that's just silliness which has been disproved......Or has it?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_note


The feedback was so bad I had to turn the guitar, a reso, right down and apparently the audience couldn't hear it.

I'd forgotten about that infrasound stuff, but now I remember seeing it discussed on one of the popular science programs under weapons/crowd control research. - That would have been at least 30 years ago.
#17
no.
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#18
Roll your treble off on your amp abit more if you need to and then use your tone knobs to taste.Just keep playing around until you get the tone you like.
My Strat does'nt have a tone control for the bridge but it's not overly ice picky because i don't use much treble on my Blues Jnr.
A good way is to roll of your tone knobs abit before you set your amp and then you can just adjust them while playing depending on what sound you want.That way you don't need to keep going back to the amp.Those knobs on your guitar are made to be used!
#19
strats can be very bright depending on the pickups. keep in mind that the traditional strat wiring has no tone control for the bridge pup. this can be fixed fairly easy by wiring it in to the middle pup tone control.

one of the mistakes that guys that are used to humbucking pickups make is dialing their amp in to bright to begin with. the other thing is not understanding where the tonal center of a good strat tone lies. strats lean more toward a trebley tone that cuts through the mix instead of the more bassy lower mid tone of a humbucker.

a lower end jay turser may not be the best way to judge strats (although they aren't bad for what they are). you also may find that the traditional vintage style strat pups aren't your thing as they are rather trebley. there are other options that aren't.
#21
Yeah, that's another good point. I definitely have to redial my tones when I move over to single coils. If I'm running the same settings I do with HBs I would say that would turn out way too bright and probably not enough gain either,
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#22
What sized pots are you using? Volume pot as well.
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#23
Quote by Cathbard
What sized pots are you using? Volume pot as well.


This. I was running 500k pots in my old Strat because I had a bridge bucker in it, the neck and middle positions were lousy with treble.
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#24
What guitars were you playing previously? It may be because you're just not used to the Strat tone. I've never rolled off the tone of my Strats, but I've been playing them for years and am probably just used to it.
#25
I hear what your saying but in my experience its actually the les pauls and shorter scale guitars that are brighter. Go figure.

My strats are SUPER dark. But i did play a new MIM strat in GC and it was SUPER bright. I fucking loved it lol. Shredded like a beast. Spanked and slapped everywhere it was so beautiful.

At any rate im sorry to hear you dont know how to use your treble knob on your amp lol. Just turn it down some... dont need to use the tone knob.

But the thing is that you are probably trying to play some softer stuff, so its natural that you will have to tone down the character of your guitar. I play my strats cranked and adjust the amp accordingly. I play mostly metal however. But when i do play some clean stuff i do tend to roll the tone and volume knob.

The knobs are there to shape the sound tho....and if you like it dark...thats what its for.

If you want not to do this get a guitar without knobs lol.