#1
So apparently there's a name for licensed floyds? I heard there was one, but i got no idea what it is. does anyone here know?
#2
A licensed Floyd Rose is a licensed Floyd Rose.
Some companies manufacture a similar design but without the license from Floyd Rose so they use a different product name, such as Ibanez with their Edge series bridge. Also Schaller (who by the way were manufacturing the Original Floyd Rose for many, many years) are no longer required to put the "licensed by..." stamp on their self-branded bridges so they produce a bridge called LockMeister which basically is a OFR.
#3
they all have different names because they have to get permission from the original patent holder. Ibanez Edge series for example will have the license.

https://www.floydrose.com/support/faq/licensed-vs-authentic
Gear:
Dean RC7X (Bareknuckle Coldsweat pickups)
Ibanez Rg2570Z (Bareknuckle Juggernaughts)
Schecter KM-6
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid 7 String
Engl Powerball II
Orange PPC412
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#4
I think the patent expired in 2000-something and companies are no longer required to pu the Licensed by stamp on their bridges.
#5
There are no more licensed Floyd Rose type bridges.
There's no requirement to license the design since the patent expired. So you won't find the word "licensed" on current-manufacture trems, and you'll likely find a better quality item for the same money that you would have paid for a licensed version (since license fees are no longer part of the manufacturer's cost.

Floyd Rose, for many years, produced its OEM OFR in Korea on one of two production lines (right next to and using the same materials as some "licensed" versions). This was the version that went on large manufacturers' guitars. The Schaller-produced OFR was handed to very small manufacturers and went into bubble packs for direct retail sales.

There are currently Floyd-Rose-branded trems at all levels of manufacture, sold BY Floyd Rose, and some of these are identical to those previously sold as "licensed" pieces.
#6
Quote by dspellman
There are no more licensed Floyd Rose type bridges.
There's no requirement to license the design since the patent expired. So you won't find the word "licensed" on current-manufacture trems, and you'll likely find a better quality item for the same money that you would have paid for a licensed version (since license fees are no longer part of the manufacturer's cost.

Floyd Rose, for many years, produced its OEM OFR in Korea on one of two production lines (right next to and using the same materials as some "licensed" versions). This was the version that went on large manufacturers' guitars. The Schaller-produced OFR was handed to very small manufacturers and went into bubble packs for direct retail sales.

There are currently Floyd-Rose-branded trems at all levels of manufacture, sold BY Floyd Rose, and some of these are identical to those previously sold as "licensed" pieces.

This is not necessarily true. He's speaking of the "1000 series" Floyd Roses which are effectively an OFR made in Korea (same specs, similar manufacturing tolerances). These were (and are) used on guitars like LTD Deluxes and similar price point guitars. Some parts are slightly different between 1000 series trems and Schaller-made OFRs but generally speaking are interchangeable for each other. They're excellent quality tremolos (FR is quite the demanding guy for parts that are made with his name on them).

The Floyd Rose Special is the "budget" official Floyd Rose model. They use slightly softer baseplates and zinc saddles and block, unlike the OFR and FR1000 which use slightly harder baseplates, steel saddles, and brass blocks.

Basically you can look at it this way, by price point.

<$300-400ish: no-name LFR (avoid like the plague, these are usually awful)
$500-700ish: FR Special (okay, but could definitely use steel saddles at some point)
$750-1100ish: FR 1000 (good trems)
$1200+: Schaller made OFR (good trems)

Sometimes you'll see very high quality LFRs on high end guitars, like the Ibanez Edge/Edge Lo Pro/Edge Pro/Edge Zero/Schaller LFR/Gotoh GE1996T depending on the brand.

My personal favorite is the Gotoh GE1996T. It takes the good parts about the OFR and makes them better (wider fine tuner range, locking studs, more comfortable saddles, angled back fine tuners).
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#8
Quote by oneblackened
This is not necessarily true. He's speaking of the "1000 series" Floyd Roses which are effectively an OFR made in Korea (same specs, similar manufacturing tolerances).


Thanks. But what I stated was on the button, and the "1000 series" wasn't named until later, when FR restructured its marketing. As of 2009, at least, Gibson and Fender were offering Korean-made OFRs on all of its gear. I have one from a $4000 Gibson Axcess Customi, and I compared it to a custom-built Agile AL-series that I received on the same day that also had a Korean-made OFR. An email from Floyd Rose confirmed that the two were produced on the same production line and that the only difference was in the stamping. At that time, the Korean version was for large manufacturers (price irrespective) and was not yet named the "1000."

Both guitars currently have Schaller-made Floyds (pre-Lockmeister) and the Koreans are on the shelf (for no particular "gear" reason; they were the wrong color).

It would be interesting to ask what Gibson and Fender are offering today on their high-end guitars.

Slightly veering off topic -- I have two guitars that have Graphtech LB63 trems. These are available two ways; with their Ghost piezo saddles and with their String Saver saddles. They have traditionally been Schaller-made OFRs, but are not currently identified as OFRs, just as the LB 63. I have the piezo versions, but the String Saver version would probably be among my first choices in a traditional FR package.

And still slightly further off-topic... I have several guitars with "licensed" trems, one dating from 1992, a Samick Artist something-or-other that was a top-of-the-line Samick neck-through superstrat in its day. The trem, I would expect, is a fairly cheap knockoff. I have a Schaller on the shelf ready to replace it when it dies. But it is still going VERY strong after nearly 25 years. Given "forum wisdom," it should probably have been gone long ago, but a regular lube and occasional knife-edge touchup have been sufficient to maintain it. In short, I wouldn't simply dismiss the "licensed" versions as crap. I'd definitely take them on a case-by-case basis.
#9
Quote by K33nbl4d3
Of course, these days you can pick out the real quality ones with this phrase:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1FZ5Hnmgsw

Mind reader.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
Quote by dspellman
Thanks. But what I stated was on the button, and the "1000 series" wasn't named until later, when FR restructured its marketing.

As of 2009, at least, Gibson and Fender were offering Korean-made OFRs on all of its gear. I have one from a $4000 Gibson Axcess Customi, and I compared it to a custom-built Agile AL-series that I received on the same day that also had a Korean-made OFR. An email from Floyd Rose confirmed that the two were produced on the same production line and that the only difference was in the stamping. At that time, the Korean version was for large manufacturers (price irrespective) and was not yet named the "1000."

Both guitars currently have Schaller-made Floyds (pre-Lockmeister) and the Koreans are on the shelf (for no particular "gear" reason; they were the wrong color).


And still slightly further off-topic... I have several guitars with "licensed" trems, one dating from 1992, a Samick Artist something-or-other that was a top-of-the-line Samick neck-through superstrat in its day. The trem, I would expect, is a fairly cheap knockoff. I have a Schaller on the shelf ready to replace it when it dies. But it is still going VERY strong after nearly 25 years. Given "forum wisdom," it should probably have been gone long ago, but a regular lube and occasional knife-edge touchup have been sufficient to maintain it. In short, I wouldn't simply dismiss the "licensed" versions as crap. I'd definitely take them on a case-by-case basis.


Yep, that's accurate. The 1000 series trems are pretty commonly mislabeled as OFRs even now. Only Jackson didn't back in the day.

As far as your licensed trem... back in the early 90s as far as I'm aware the "cheap knockoff" LFRs were still pretty decent quality bridges, more or less equivalent to the Takeuchi TRS101s which are quite good LFRs (with a price point to match, they were over $100 a pop last time I checked).
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.