#1
Hi,

Ok so right now when i want to learn a new song or solo or something i start with printing out the tab and then divide the solo for example into parts.

Then i try to learn the pattern of the whole solo so i can remember the pattern. I play it really slow untill i know it in the back of my head.

Then i just try to pick up the speed and do it faster. At last i play it with a backing track and practice it that way.

Would you say thats a good method of learning something new or how do you learn a new solo or song ? Do you have any tips ?
#2
For me learning the melody first always helps. Practice its feel with improv in your own style. Then come back to it. Facility in the melody is a great way to earn command of it and ultimately be able to play it.

The way you have described is pretty good though. Not a bad formula.
#3
I think it's an individual thing.Use what works best for you.I like to learn a section at a time and get it perfect but if your way is best for you then do it that way.
#4
The absolute first thing to do is to listen the crap out of the song until you know it inside out from memory - it's practically impossible to learn to play something effectively if you don't first know exactly what the bits you're trying to play are supposed to sound like.
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#6
Quote by nicklaspetrel
One quick question. If you check this video at the 3.29 mark.

How do one do that ? Is it a slide back and forth on all strings or?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bg4ww-jh-PM


No you just fret the 6th string and slide downwards. In this case he slides from the 14th fret, 6th string. The fuller sound comes from the distortion/overdrive and strumming not just the 6th string but also the strings below it while muting with the fretting hand.
#7
As Steven Seagull said, listen to the solo enough times to be able to sing the melody in your head. Without this you will just be playing the numbers of the tab rather than hearing those numbers (notes) as a piece of music. Understand how those notes fit into each phrase.

Break up the solo into small manageable parts, as you would learning any piece of music. Like learning what the verse music is, then the chorus. Build it phrase by phrase.

Get some audio software to help out as well. I use Amazing Slow Downer and Audacity. Both allow you to save sections of the music which makes it much easier to concentrate on certain parts, especially when learning solos. Both programs also allow you to slow down the music without changing pitch. Very helpful.

Write things down as well. Make notes or label sections with something meaningful to you. I have been learning a few songs by the band Yes lately. Long 11 minute and 20 minute tunes so lots of musical pieces. To label a section or riff coming up i would give it a name. Made me associate the part with what to play.
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#8
I agree with Steven Seagull above. You need to listen to a song as many times as it takes to be able to tackle any part of it mentally. I also suggest you start by learning the chords used in the song. Learning the lead parts before learning how to play all the chords all the way through puts you in a position where you are just memorizing notes without relating them to the chords used to support the lead. If you always know the chord structure of the song first you will slowly begin to relate the notes you are playing in the solo to the chords and key of the song. With experience over a period of time you will begin to see scales and lead patterns in the solos you are playing and not just reading a tab or memorizing individual notes.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jun 13, 2016,
#9
Th trick to learning any song or solo properly is to learn it in very smaller clusters - 4 or 8 bars at a time and never move on to the next section until you've mastered the previous section. Then, play up to where you are at from the beginning - that way you really drill in the muscle memory. If you run into a trouble spot, loop that part until you get it.
#10
Quote by reverb66
Th trick to learning any song or solo properly is to learn it in very smaller clusters - 4 or 8 bars at a time and never move on to the next section until you've mastered the previous section. Then, play up to where you are at from the beginning - that way you really drill in the muscle memory. If you run into a trouble spot, loop that part until you get it.


+1. Something like Transcribe from seventhstring really helps.
#11
If what you're doing is working for you then keep doing it. Make sure that you are taking notes on any reoccurring mistakes, so that you can go back and isolate just those parts instead of running through the whole thing. Otherwise they will keep being mistakes.
#12
I agree with everyone else: make sure you know the song you're learning inside and out!

That way, you can use your ear and relate the tabs to the song and make adjustments if needed. Also, I don't know about you, but I find it hard learning a song that I'm not familiar with or don't know at all. I have no reference point of the song's tempo or how it should sound.
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#13
Quote by aerosmithfan95
I agree with everyone else: make sure you know the song you're learning inside and out!

That way, you can use your ear and relate the tabs to the song and make adjustments if needed. Also, I don't know about you, but I find it hard learning a song that I'm not familiar with or don't know at all. I have no reference point of the song's tempo or how it should sound.


Just a general observation here - I am NOT saying that this is "better".

But coming from a classical/traditional music training background (not at a very high level, BTW) NOT being able to play a song strictly from the music (without first hearing it played) feels like a weakness.

But now that I am 'over all that' I certainly much prefer hearing it first. However, I recall 'back in the days' (late 70's) when I would pick an arrangement of something to learn, I might not ever get a chance to hear it. I pretty much learned to play "The Claw" (Jerry Reed) without ever hearing it. Somebody sent me an arrangement and told me it was pretty good. That was that.

Not the fastest path I admit.

dave
#14
Quote by DaveLeeNC
Quote by aerosmithfan95
I agree with everyone else: make sure you know the song you're learning inside and out!

That way, you can use your ear and relate the tabs to the song and make adjustments if needed. Also, I don't know about you, but I find it hard learning a song that I'm not familiar with or don't know at all. I have no reference point of the song's tempo or how it should sound.


Just a general observation here - I am NOT saying that this is "better".

But coming from a classical/traditional music training background (not at a very high level, BTW) NOT being able to play a song strictly from the music (without first hearing it played) feels like a weakness.

But now that I am 'over all that' I certainly much prefer hearing it first. However, I recall 'back in the days' (late 70's) when I would pick an arrangement of something to learn, I might not ever get a chance to hear it. I pretty much learned to play "The Claw" (Jerry Reed) without ever hearing it. Somebody sent me an arrangement and told me it was pretty good. That was that.

Not the fastest path I admit.

dave


Yeah, I've read quite a few jazz standards and classical tunes from the sheet music without hearing it at all. Hell, I've read through Mozart's Sonata #16 and can play it, yet I never heard any other performance of it.

I was refering to your typical rock song that many people on here play. For the most part, if a player looks at a text tab for a song, they'd have no reference point on any note value for most of the song. When given sheet music, that makes it a lot more easier for to read through then if a person had messy text tab that someone thrown together on here.
Skip the username, call me Billy