#1
I ran into the following in a classical guitar ebook sample. It is, of course, addressing classical guitar playing and, I assume, each note is to be 'played'. It is for a straight forward 2 octave diatonic major scale played in 16th notes.

Basic Competency - 66 bpm
Beginning Fluency - 92 bpm
Advanced Fluency - 116 bpm
Virtuoso - 132 bpm

I found it interesting. It is from the book Classical Guitar Technique 2000 by Charles Duncan (and I know pretty much nothing about this book other than was was in the Google sample).

dave
#2
All I see is blatant stupidity. What's the point of learning to run up and down a scale super fast? Sure, you become impressive when playing said scale, but does it actually help your overall ability as a guitarist? No. And saying you're a virtuoso at 132 bpm is like saying you're the best mechanic in the world because you can change a tire in less than five minutes.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#4
I am not "saying anything". I am reporting that Charles Duncan is saying that (in the classical guitar world) if you are a virtuoso you can plan a 2 octave diatonic major scale at 132 bpm. Note that in the classical guitar world a 2 octave diatonic scale form is going to be something that most trained guitarists are very familiar with. Neither Charles Duncan or I said said that doing this makes you a virtuoso. It never occurred to me that some folks would leap to such a silly conclusion.

dave
#5
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Technique-wise: those numbers are setting the bar low ... very low! Musically, it really isn't important to literally ascend and descend scales ... that's not what it's all about.


That was my sense of things strictly from a technique perspective. It just didn't sound 'fast' in a manner that is discussed in places like this (not that it is something that I am capable of).

Maybe it is a different standard, or maybe it is the difference between playing on higher action/lower tension strings with your fingers vs. the typical electric guitar setup w/pick.

dave
#6
Quote by DaveLeeNC
That was my sense of things strictly from a technique perspective. It just didn't sound 'fast' in a manner that is discussed in places like this (not that it is something that I am capable of).

Maybe it is a different standard, or maybe it is the difference between playing on higher action/lower tension strings with your fingers vs. the typical electric guitar setup w/pick.

dave


I'm sure it also assumes that you're playing fingerstyle, alternating between two fingers only, and able to do all combinations equally well.
#7
Quote by Junior#1
All I see is blatant stupidity. What's the point of learning to run up and down a scale super fast? Sure, you become impressive when playing said scale, but does it actually help your overall ability as a guitarist? No. And saying you're a virtuoso at 132 bpm is like saying you're the best mechanic in the world because you can change a tire in less than five minutes.


Well the point is to develop the technique so you can use it in actual music. Bear in mind it was in reference to classical guitar, where fully articulated 16ths at 132bpm is completely ridiculous. Classical music has a very strong focus on technique (well, all musical skills really), so it's pretty important for a classical player to be able to just play crazy stuff without blinking. The rest of us can take our time and work stuff out as we go, but classical players got concerts to give and have to have that stuff ready to go.
#8
16ths at 132? Even with two fingers that isn't at all impressive.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
I legitimately do scale playing like that all the time anyway in my playing on the slower tunes (albeit playing 8th notes at around the 240-300 range rather than 16ths in the 120-150 range). Do you want me to humor you and record a straight two octaves with two fingers?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#11
Well if you are going to approach the guitar as a real instrument, and not a jam band gimmick for hipsters, then you must practice scales, articulation, picking, etc.
#12
Quote by Marko5150
Well if you are going to approach the guitar as a real instrument, and not a jam band gimmick for hipsters, then you must practice scales, articulation, picking, etc.
This is the dumbest thing I have ever heard. There are many great musicians who don't spend their time running scales.
#13
Quote by Blicer
This is the dumbest thing I have ever heard. There are many great musicians who don't spend their time running scales.


I suppose, but running scales can only help you, it will never hurt you. Great technique is better to have and not need, than to need and not have.