#1
Hi I am wanting to learn Ozzy's "I dont know" just the guitar solo. I have the guitar pro tab and I would like to change it to the key of E minor, I think the original key of the song is A major, maybe someone could help me verifiy that too, but how would I change the key? how many half steps up or down would I change it, I dont understand how to do it Thanks
#2
Mm you need to learn note names and intervals, someone else can get you started on that.

The song starts in A minor, not major. E minor is either a perfect fifth up or a perfect fourth down. P5 = 7 half-steps, P4 = 5.

(key changes are good too. thanks everyone else for listening to more of the song ~)
#4
If the original key really was A major (it isn't), changing the key deosn't really work that way. You can't really change something from A major to E minor, unless you changed some of the intervals and that would make it sound different. If you want it to sound the same but just play it in a different key, you can't change something from A major to E minor. But you can change it from A minor to E minor or A major to E major.

The key of the song is A minor, but the key of the solo is not (the song has some key changes). The solo is in G minor.

And also what cdgraves said. Why are you trying to transpose it in the first place? And if you want to transpose something, first learn what a key is and how to figure it out.
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#5
The primary reason for changing the key of a song is for the benefit of the singer.

I hate to say this but if you want to go up, use a capo. If you want to go down, tune the guitar down. OK, either one of those tactics works best moving by less that 3 frets, or "3 semitones".

Some songs are notorious for their chord "voices", or "chord shapes", if you prefer. For example, Pink Floyd's "Time", is in F# minor. It would be easy as hell to change it to E minor. But, you lose the E major and A major open chords, which give the song most of its characteristic sound.

"A major to E minor" can't be done without changing the chord progression and rewriting the melody anyway. Then what you have is a different song.

If you want to make a reasonable shift in key, just change the fret you start to solo on. As most electric solos are played at position anyway, that should be easy enough. If there are open strings in the solo, you can always use a capo to re-tune them as well. (or again, tune down if you're going the other way).

In all honesty, I can't imagine needing a full 5th of a key change for a song.........EXCEPT....if you're changing the sex of the lead vocalist!.
#6
Hi thanks for the replys, I just want to change the solo to the key of E Minor because that is really the only key I know how to improvise in while staying in key ( I know that sucks) but I like to trying to improvise over backing tracks in E Minor, my idea was to use parts of the solo and try to put my own spin on it and make it my own and so I could play it over different backing tracks, so if the solo is in g minor could I move everything down by 3 half steps and would it be in e Minor then?
#7
Maybe you should get over your problem by learning different keys and how to work with them instead.

But yeah to intervals.
#8
Well if you just want to improvise in Em, you don't have to learn any solos.

But you could and probably should use this moment to learn how to play in other keys, as well as improve your technique and musicality by learning from whichever guitar master played that solo on Ozzy's album. Certainly tabs are available for this tune, and you can use them to work out which notes are which and come away with more guitar ability than when you started. I mean, if you're gonna take the time to learn it, don't short yourself the experience you could gain in that time.
#9
Quote by Frenetixx7
Hi thanks for the replys, I just want to change the solo to the key of E Minor because that is really the only key I know how to improvise in while staying in key ( I know that sucks) but I like to trying to improvise over backing tracks in E Minor, my idea was to use parts of the solo and try to put my own spin on it and make it my own and so I could play it over different backing tracks, so if the solo is in g minor could I move everything down by 3 half steps and would it be in e Minor then?
OK Junior look, you already know the A minor scale, save for one note difference from the E minor scale.

E minor is the relative minor to G major. G major has 1 sharp, the F...., So "F#".

A minor in the relative minor to C major, which has no sharps or flats. So our Em F# is going to be dropped a fret to F natural. (This only attaches to the major on minor diatonic, "8 tone" scale. I'll explain the more commonly used in rock 5 note "pentatonic scale", below.

You can play the scale at the same position, more or less. The big difference is, playing in Am, you're basically going to resolve your solos back to a Am chord as the tonic. In Em, you resolve back to Em as the tonic.

Without any heavy thought or theory involved, when the Em key's chord progression comes back to Em, (the tonic"), you play an E note.

Again, without any heavy thought or theory involved, when the Am key's chord progression comes back to Am, (again the "tonic"), play an "A".

If we're talking in terms of the Em pentatonic scale at the "open position", all you have to do is move the whole mess up to the 5th fret..

That does require that you use your index finger to "barre" with, because you have to replace the guitar's top nut with your finger.

But, once you learn to do that "shape" you can improvise in any key with that pentatonic scale". The key or scale name will be on your low E-6 string.

So, here's "Am pentatonic" at the 5th fret.

e-1----5 = A, 8 = C
B-2---5 = E , 8 = G
G-3---5 = C, 7 =D
D-4---5 = G, 7 = A
A-5---5 = D, 7 = E
E-6---5 = A , 7 = C (again)

Notice that the contested differential F note doesn't even appear in either pentatonic scale, and you needn't concern yourself with it, at least for the time being.

Please remember what I told you before, almost every time you change the key of a song, it is to accommodate the vocalist's "range". (How many notes they can sing, (stated in octaves + interval remainder) where those notes begin low, and where they end high!


Now go practice.
#10
Quote by Frenetixx7
Hi thanks for the replys, I just want to change the solo to the key of E Minor because that is really the only key I know how to improvise in while staying in key ( I know that sucks) but I like to trying to improvise over backing tracks in E Minor, my idea was to use parts of the solo and try to put my own spin on it and make it my own and so I could play it over different backing tracks, so if the solo is in g minor could I move everything down by 3 half steps and would it be in e Minor then?
Yes. Or you could keep the backing track in the same key, and move your E minor patterns 3 frets up. Surely that's a lot easier?
#11
Quote by jongtr
Yes. Or you could keep the backing track in the same key, and move your E minor patterns 3 frets up. Surely that's a lot easier?


Wouldn't moving the patterns up 3 frets give you G minor?

EDIT: Never mind. I forgot that MaggaraMarine changed the key of the solo again, to G minor. Should I rewrite my pentatonic scale pattern? Or do youu think the TS will be able to drop it 2 frets on his own?